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Ex-NFL star Cris Carter, brother sued for $12K over rap song investment

Rand Getlin
Yahoo Sports

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Cris Carter spent 12 of his 16 NFL seasons with the Vikings. (US Presswire)

Former NFL receiver Cris Carter and a brother are being sued for conversion – the civil equivalent of the criminal charge of theft – by a Florida man who claims he invested $12,500 in a business venture with the pair.

In the lawsuit filed in Broward County court Wednesday, Terrence Williams claims he was approached in June 2011 with an opportunity to invest in a rap song performed and produced by "famous" musicians with whom Carter and his brother George had a connection. Cris Carter allegedly induced Williams to invest in the project by suggesting "millions of dollars" could be made from sales of the song to University of Alabama fans. According to Williams' lawsuit, Carter said he was poised to become the school's wide receivers coach. Williams says Carter told him those sales would occur as a result of the song being played repeatedly at Alabama home games in Bryant-Denney stadium.

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It is unknown whether Carter, a former NFL analyst for Yahoo! Sports who currently serves as an ESPN analyst, was actually a candidate for the Alabama position, but current Crimson Tide wide receivers coach Mike Groh was hired in February 2011 to fill that role.

"It is a dispute between the two of them and I am not involved," Cris Carter said in a statement through his agency, Impact Sports. "As we proceed through the legal process [I] anticipate my name to be removed from the case."

After the money was allegedly transferred to George Carter – who Williams claims was in charge of the investment – Williams says he repeatedly asked the Carter brothers for a contract confirming their agreement. After a year with no contract, song or indication as to what his money had been used for, Williams says he repeatedly demanded his money back from the Carters but to no avail.

"The lawsuit speaks for itself," Williams' attorney, Daniel Rose, said. "Mr. [Cris] Carter was given multiple opportunities to resolve this prior to [Wednesday's] filing and he never responded. My client just wants his money back."

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