Breaking News:

Fourth-Place Medal

Bob Costas intends to honor Munich victims, call out IOC

Fourth-Place Medal

Forty years ago this summer, the Olympic world was rocked by the tragedy of the Munich Massacre. Recently there was public outcry when the International Olympic Committee refused to honor the Israeli victims of the 1972 Palestinian terror attacks.

Bob Costas (AP Photo/Evan Agostini)

If the IOC won't do it, Bob Costas won't let that go unnoticed.

Costas, who is NBC Sports' lead anchor for the London Games, told The Hollywood Reporter that he intends to call out the committee as the Israeli delegation is introduced during the Opening Ceremony on July 27 at the Olympic Stadium.

"I intend to note that the IOC denied the request," Costas said. "Many people find that denial more than puzzling but insensitive. Here's a minute of silence right now."

Costas appears to be joining the efforts of Israeli Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon and Ankie Spitzer, whose husband was among the Munich victims. Ayalon said the IOC refusal of his request to commemorate the victims was "unacceptable." Spitzer, meanwhile, has been petitioning to have a moment of silence during the Opening Ceremony, to no avail.

"The IOC's refusal is pure discrimination," she said.

Additionally, the both President Barack Obama and the White House have put their support behind a moment of silence, further fueling the tension of the situation.

It seems unlikely, however, the IOC will reverse its position. The committee acknowledges that the Munich victims have been honored at every Summer Olympics since the tragedy, with the exception of the 1980 Moscow Games.

Even without the IOC's consent, Costas seems determined to keep the issue in the spotlight.

Related video:

More Olympic coverage on the Yahoo! Sports network:
Middleton family investigated for Olympic wrongdoing
Popular NBC hoops theme won't feature during London Games
How Mary Lou Retton became America's sweetheart

Sign up for Yahoo Fantasy Football
View Comments (1624)