MLB managers on the hot seat: Walt Weiss and Chip Hale fired, who's next?

Big League Stew

The regular season might be over, but the real fun is just beginning for any club that didn’t make the postseason. When things don’t go your way in baseball, people get fired. And the most expendable members of any baseball team is the manager.

With no baseball scheduled for Monday, that could make for the perfect opportunity for clubs to say goodbye to their current managers. With that in mind, let’s take a look at some cloudy managerial situations around the league. The first to go was Colorado Rockies skipper Walt Weiss, who resigned his post after three seasons. The Arizona Diamondbacks then canned Chip Hale after two years, along with GM Dave Stewart. He’s not a manager, but Barry Bonds was also reportedly fired Monday as Miami Marlins hitting coach.

It’s important to note that some clubs didn’t even wait until Monday to make announcements regarding their skippers. Robin Ventura is leaving the Chicago White Sox, while the Cincinnati Reds will retain Bryan Price. We’ve included those teams below so you can stay informed while you wait for the postseason.

First, let’s start with situations that still need to be resolved:

It would be a shock if the Angels parted ways with Mike Scioscia. (Getty Images/Sean M. Haffey)
It would be a shock if the Angels parted ways with Mike Scioscia. (Getty Images/Sean M. Haffey)

MIKE SCIOSCIA, LOS ANGELES ANGELS
This one would be bold, but it’s worth covering. Scioscia is well-entrenched in Los Angeles, just finishing up his 17th season with the team. He famously won a front office battle last season, which saw the club keep him over general manager Jerry DiPoto. While the Angels finished a disappointing 74-88, it seems Scioscia is still in great standing. For what it’s worth, he expects to be back and has already considered possible coaching changes on his staff for next year.
VERDICT: It would be a shock if the Angels let him go.

BOB MELVIN, OAKLAND ATHLETICS
Despite winning just 68 and 69 games in 2015 and 2016, Melvin appears to be in good shape in Oakland. Though there was some unrest in the locker room this year, Melvin seemed to navigate through the issue. He signed an extension with the club last year, and there’s every reason to think he’ll be back
VERDICT: It sure looks like he’ll return.

KEVIN CASH, TAMPA BAY RAYS
Cash just completed his second season with the Rays, and while the club disappointed, there’s little indication Cash is on his way out. He signed a five-year deal with the team back in 2014, and spoke confidently about the team’s future during Sunday’s post-game press conference with reporters. Both the front office and the players have been complimentary of Cash’s performance this season
VERDICT: He’ll be back.

PAUL MOLITOR, MINNESOTA TWINS
With the Twins front office in upheaval, it would be safe to assume Molitor’s job could be in jeopardy. That doesn’t appear to be the case. Molitor is under contract through 2017, and has given the Twins every indication he would like to continue managing. On top of that, owner Jim Pohlad gave Molitor a vote of confidence in a letter sent to season ticket holders in September. Despite his 142-182 record over the past two seasons, Molitor seems likely to be back.
VERDICT: All signs point to Molitor being around in 2017.

PETE MACKANIN, PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES
Mackanin met with the front office for four hours in late September to discuss the future of the franchise, so it certainly seems like he’ll be back. He’s gone just 108-142 in his two years with the club, but everyone knew the Phillies were in the middle of a rebuild.
VERDICT: He’ll continue to attempt to guide the Phillies through this rebuild.

CRAIG COUNSELL, MILWAUKEE BREWERS
Owner Mark Attanasio gave Counsell high marks when talking about the franchise rebuild in late September. Though the Brewers haven’t been strong under his watch, Counsell seems to get high marks around the game. In fact, with Counsell entering his final season of his current contract, there’s a chance he’ll receive an extension during the offseason. Few teams allow managers to enter lame duck status, so the move makes sense from that perspective.
VERDICT: Seems like he’ll stick around.

A strong second half could save Braves manager Brian Snitker. (Getty Images/Rich Schultz)
A strong second half could save Braves manager Brian Snitker. (Getty Images/Rich Schultz)

BRIAN SNITKER, ATLANTA BRAVES
A strong finish may keep Snitker around for 2017, though his status remains up in the air heading into Monday. He’s still carrying an interim tag after replacing Fredi Gonzalez mid-season, and the Braves have set up interviews with the likes of Bud Black and Ron Washington, but that doesn’t mean Snitker is getting the boot. With Snitker, the Braves played respectable ball down the stretch, going 34-27 since July 26. While this doesn’t factor into the front office’s decision, reliever Jim Johnson praised Snitker’s style shortly after agreeing to a two-year extension with the club.
VERDICT: There’s some uncertainty, but a decent second half may save him.

ANDY GREEN, SAN DIEGO PADRES
The Padres won 68 games this year, but it was Green’s first season at the helm. Making a change this early wouldn’t make sense.
VERDICT: 
Expect him to return.

CLINT HURDLE, PITTSBURGH PIRATES
Look, we know the Pirates had a down year, but it would be a shock if they parted ways with Hurdle. He’s been a main factor in the team’s recent resurgence and will get a shot to turn things around with them next year.
VERDICT: Yeah, he’s fine.

Here are four situations that have already been addressed for next season:

It doesn’t look like Chip Hale is going to survive the D-Backs’ overhaul. (Getty Images/Jennifer Stewart)
It doesn’t look like Chip Hale is going to survive the D-Backs’ overhaul. (Getty Images/Jennifer Stewart)

CHIP HALE, ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS
There was a lot of uncertainty surrounding the Diamondbacks, but they made a couple things certain Monday. Hale, along with second-year GM Dave Stewart, were sent out the door by the D-backs ownership. The club said it was still trying to figure out what to do about Tony La Russa, who was both of their boss. 
VERDICT: 
Gone.

ROBIN VENTURA, CHICAGO WHITE SOX
Following Sunday’s game, Ventura announced he would step down as the White Sox’s manager. Over five seasons with the club, he compiled a 375-434 record. There were rumors earlier in the week that Chicago was willing to retain Ventura, but only if he wanted to come back. It’s expected bench coach Rick Renteria will take over for Ventura next year. It’s expected Renteria will be introduced as the team’s manager during a press conference Monday.
VERDICT: Gone.

WALT WEISS, COLORADO ROCKIES
Weiss completed his initial three-year contract with Colorado following Sunday’s game against the Brewers and that proved to his final game as the Rockies manager. Weiss hadn’t put together a great record, going 283-365 in four years, but it was his relationship with general manager Jeff Bridich that was his real undoing. According to the Denver Post, the two have not worked well together recently. Weiss reportedly wasn’t consulted on some of the club’s acquisitions as the year went on. 
VERDICT: 
Gone.

BRYAN PRICE, CINCINNATI REDS
The Reds have already announced Price will return for the 2017 season. In three years with the club, he’s compiled a 208-277 record.
VERDICT: Staying.

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Chris Cwik is a writer for Big League Stew on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at christophercwik@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter! Follow @Chris_Cwik

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