Arsenal captain Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang has malaria

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Jason Owens
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Arsenal's Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang during the Premier League match at the Emirates Stadium, London. Picture date: Sunday February 21, 2021. (Photo by John Walton/PA Images via Getty Images)
Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang announced on Thursday that he has malaria. (John Walton/PA Images via Getty Images)

Arsenal star Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang announced on Thursday that he has been hospitalized with malaria. 

The Arsenal team captain made the announcement on Instagram alongside an image of himself in a hospital bed. He contracted the parasite on a trip home to Gabon with his national team while on international break in March.

He wrote that he's "spent a few days in hospital this week but I’m already feeling much better every day."

"I wasn’t really feeling myself the last couple weeks but will be back stronger than ever soon!"

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Aubameyang has played since becoming infected

Aubameyang has played twice with Arsenal since returning from Gabon — a Premier League loss to Liverpool on April 3 and a draw against Slavia Prague in Europa League play on April 8. He missed Sunday's Premier League loss to Sheffield United with what the team described at the time as the flu

What is malaria?

Malaria is commonly transmitted through parasitic mosquito bites. Per the CDC, it is not a contagious disease that can be spread through casual person-to-person contact. 

Common malaria symptoms include high fevers, shaking chills and flu-like illness. The CDC describes it as "a serious and sometimes fatal disease" that can result in severe infections if not promptly treated. It also notes that with proper treatment, illness and death "can usually be prevented."

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