Which hockey word should be banned in 2015?

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DALLAS, TX - APRIL 09: Tim Thomas #30 of the Dallas Stars stretches while a ice girl skates past at American Airlines Center on April 9, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - APRIL 09: Tim Thomas #30 of the Dallas Stars stretches while a ice girl skates past at American Airlines Center on April 9, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

TIME Magazine runs an annual poll asking which words should be “banned” in the following year. It’s a poll we honestly weren’t aware of until they made the incredibly daft move of asking if “feminist” should be banned, which went over about as well as flatulence in a crowded elevator. 

Here at Puck Daddy, we felt it was time to put some hockey words and phrases to the test, and delete some terms from our puck vocabulary in 2015.

The following selections are from the Puck Daddy staff and friends -- Greg Wyshynski, Sean Leahy, Josh Cooper, Ryan Lambert, Jen Neale, Jen Lute Costella, Dobber and Jon Press among them. Some of these terms are new, some are old; some are annoying terms used by non-players to sound like players; and at least two are sourced to national broadcasters that frequently make fans’ foreheads meet their palms.

Which hockey words or terms should be banned in 2015? Vote away!

Which hockey word should be bannedin 2015?

Here's a brief look at the contenders: 

Active Stick: A favorite of commentators like Eddie O. "What does this even mean?" asks Lambert. 

Compete Level: Used to indicate how hard a player is trying at his job. "Players, for the most part, try the same amount just about every game, but it only becomes a problem if they stop scoring goals/start losing," says Lambert. 

Celly: Short for "celebration" and usually preceded by "sick." Says Lambert: "Just embarrassing for grown men to say things like this (actually that goes for any word 50-year-old John Buccigross says without irony)." Ouch.       

Enigmatic: "Does this count as a hockey word? Because it'd be nice to force writers to use another word to describe European players who occasionally go two games without a point," said JP.

Fancy Stats: The shorthand for hockey analytics. "They’re not fancy," said JP.

Filthy: The next level of "sick." Applied to both mitts and goals and moves.

Goon: Since there's like, what, six of them left in the NHL, do we really need this anymore? (Note: We still want to see "Goon 2.")

“Go Have Fun Out There”: The farewell greeting of Pierre McGuire, or variation thereof, after each interview on the ice. 

Grit: Because "sandpaper" is just too long to describe incalculable character. 

Ice Girl: If only because, in a perfect world, every ice-cleaning team would be co-ed. 

Intent To Blow: The thing where the referee ends a play in his mind before he ends it with his whistle, and we can't overturn it on review. 

Mild Concussion: "That's like 'cancer light', or 'almost pregnant,'" said Dobber.

Puck Bunny: Because we're tired of it being used as a catch-all label for women that love hockey. 

Sauce: It's usually a great pass, but Leahy believes it's in that collection of mind-numbing hockey lingo like "bar down" and "cheddar."

Successful Surgery: Via Dobber, "Don't get me started on this one. Until I see a headline or team statement saying 'Unsuccessful Surgery' then it's redundant to say the surgery was successful. Besides, you don't even really know if it was successful until a year goes by without any setbacks. More spin."

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Voting will end on Sunday night at midnight ET. We'll publish the banned word on Monday here on Puck Daddy!