4 things to know about new Jets LB LaRoy Reynolds

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With linebacker depth an issue for the Jets after a number of injuries, the team signed journeyman LaRoy Reynolds to the practice squad this week.

Reynolds, who turns 31 on Nov. 3, was a 2013 undrafted free agent out of Virginia. He’s seen action in 117 games over eight seasons, playing mostly on special teams. The 6-foot-1, 240-pound linebacker has 117 combined tackles, three quarterback hits, three tackles for a loss and one forced fumbled to his name.

He spent two months with the Patriots this past offseason but was released with an injury settlement in May. Reynolds has also spent time with the Jaguars, Bears, Falcons, Bengals, Eagles and 49ers.

Here are four things to know about the Jets’ newest linebacker.

Lots of Jets connections

(Jack Dempsey-AP)

Reynolds is familiar with the Jets coaching staff and front office. He played under Robert Saleh with the Jaguars in 2014 and with the 49ers in 2019. He was with Jeff Ulbrich and the Falcons from 2016-17 and in 2020. Reynolds also spent the 2018 season with the Eagles during Joe Douglas’ time as vice president of player personnel.

Fearless tackler

Reynolds’ most famous play came during his rookie season in Jacksonville. The linebacker lost his helmet against the Colts in 2013 but still ran 30 yards downfield to make a special teams tackle.

Special teams player

(Brett Davis-USA TODAY Sports)

Reynolds has been known more for his plays on special teams, as shown in his no-helmet tackle in 2013. He’s played 3,772 special teams snaps in his NFL career compared to just 826 defensive snaps.

Positional versatility

(Josh Lefkowitz-Getty Images)

Reynolds has only played linebacker in the NFL but was originally a safety in college at Virginia. He talked with former Cowboys second-rounder Bruce Carter in 2011 about the switch, according to the Daily Press, which helped him finish his college career with 178 combined tackles, 17.5 tackles for a loss and one sack in the final two years of his career. Though he’ll likely see a lot of special teams work in New York, Reynolds’ coverage ability could be needed in certain defensive situations.

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