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Shocking story about lawsuit that claims Roberto Alomar has AIDS

David Brown
Big League Stew

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This sounds like a story arc from the old primetime soap "Dynasty" after the show jumped the shark.

But it's Roberto Alomar, a probable Hall of Famer, so here we go.

The New York Daily News reports Alomar's former girlfriend claims in a lawsuit that he insisted on having unprotected sex with her while knowing he had AIDS.

Whoa. It's not quite the same "whoa" felt after learning about Magic Johnson in 1991, but it's a big "whoa."

Ilya Dall filed a $15-million suit against Alomar on Jan. 30. Dall has tested negative for HIV, but in the suit claims "Alomar caused her emotional distress and exposed her children to the virus." She and Alomar ended a three-year relationship in October.

As if those details aren't shocking enough, from the Daily News:

In April 2005, Alomar told Dall he was suffering from erectile dysfunction and confided "he was raped by two Mexican men after playing a ballgame in New Mexico or a Southwestern state when he was 17," the suit says.

Whoa, again.

The Daily News could not reach Alomar, or get Dall or her attorney to comment, but Alomar's lawyer Charles Bach called the suit "frivolous" and "baseless." (Lawyers need new adjectives.)

The story, if true, is first profoundly sad. It outlines Alomar's alleged health problems in recent years, including shingles, persistent cough, fatigue, purple skin, foaming at the mouth and blood disorders.

The above photo was taken this past April, when Alomar was honored in Toronto before a Blue Jays game. Not that it's proof, but he looks like the same-ol' Robbie Alomar.

Alomar retired from baseball in 2004 after 12 All-Star appearances and 10 Gold Gloves over 17 seasons with the Padres, Jays, Orioles, Indians, Mets, White Sox and D-backs.

Sandy Alomar Sr., Alomar's dad and a Mets coach, sounded like this was the first time he heard of his son contracting AIDS.

"I imagine I would know," Sandy Alomar told the newspaper.

The Daily News' story takes a sensational left turn, if that's possible, when it quotes umpire John Hirschbeck, whose face Alomar infamously spat on, during an argument in 1996.

HIV has never been contracted through saliva (which the story points out) but the News takes the step of talking to Hirschbeck, anyway, and asking him if he fears for his health. He doesn't.

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