The Whistleblowers

By Claudine Zap

Edward Snowden publicly acknowledged he is the intelligence contractor who leaked documents from the National Security Agency's surveillance programs. He is one of a long line of whistleblowers. Here are some of the best known.

W. Mark Felt, left, answers questions for reporters outside District Court in Washington, Monday, Dec. 15, 1980. Felt and Edward S. Miller, right, were fined a total of $8,500 in fines for approving illegal break-ins during a search for radicals. (AP Photo/Schwarz)
Whistle Blowers
W. Mark Felt, left, answers questions for reporters outside District Court in Washington, Monday, Dec. 15, 1980. Felt and Edward S. Miller, right, were fined a total of $8,500 in fines for approving illegal break-ins during a search for radicals. (AP Photo/Schwarz)
¦In this Wednesday, April 12, 1973 photo, Daniel Ellsberg, co-defendant in the Pentagon Papers trial, talks with newsmen after he testified in Los Angeles. Next to him is his wife, Patricia. Ellsberg, who vividly described his journey to disillusionment in Vietnam on Wednesday, will climax that story on Thursday, telling jurors how he risked his government career to copy the Pentagon Papers, hoping to end the war. As the last U.S. combat troops left Vietnam 40 years ago, angry protesters still awaited them at home. North Vietnamese soldiers took heart from their foes' departure, and South Vietnamese who had helped the Americans feared for the future. While the fall of Saigon two years later with its indelible images of frantic helicopter evacuations is remembered as the final day of the Vietnam War, Friday marks an anniversary that holds greater meaning for many who fought, protested or otherwise lived it. (AP Photo)
Whistle Blowers
¦In this Wednesday, April 12, 1973 photo, Daniel Ellsberg, co-defendant in the Pentagon Papers trial, talks with newsmen after he testified in Los Angeles. Next to him is his wife, Patricia. Ellsberg, who vividly described his journey to disillusionment in Vietnam on Wednesday, will climax that story on Thursday, telling jurors how he risked his government career to copy the Pentagon Papers, hoping to end the war. As the last U.S. combat troops left Vietnam 40 years ago, angry protesters still awaited them at home. North Vietnamese soldiers took heart from their foes' departure, and South Vietnamese who had helped the Americans feared for the future. While the fall of Saigon two years later with its indelible images of frantic helicopter evacuations is remembered as the final day of the Vietnam War, Friday marks an anniversary that holds greater meaning for many who fought, protested or otherwise lived it. (AP Photo)
6Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, June 5, 2013, after the third day of his court martial. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Whistle Blowers
6Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Wednesday, June 5, 2013, after the third day of his court martial. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Karen Silkwood poses in this undated photo. (AP Images)
Whistle Blowers
Karen Silkwood poses in this undated photo. (AP Images)
Former Archer Daniels Midland executive Mark E. Whitacre takes off his coat on his way to federal court in Chicago Dec. 19, 1996. Whitacre, who secretly recorded conversations that snared the company in a global price-fixing case, pleaded guilty Friday, Oct. 10, 1997, to swindling ADM out of $9 million. (AP Photo/Charles Bennett)
Whistle Blowers
Former Archer Daniels Midland executive Mark E. Whitacre takes off his coat on his way to federal court in Chicago Dec. 19, 1996. Whitacre, who secretly recorded conversations that snared the company in a global price-fixing case, pleaded guilty Friday, Oct. 10, 1997, to swindling ADM out of $9 million. (AP Photo/Charles Bennett)
Jeffrey S. Wigand, who has made controversial disclosures about the tobacco industry, speaks with reporters outside of Federal Court, Monday, Jan. 31, 2005, in Washington. The Justice Department is suing the tobacco industry for $280 billion for conspiring to deceive the public about health risks associated with cigarettes.Wigand is a key government witness. (AP Photo/Lawrence Jackson)
Whistle Blowers
Jeffrey S. Wigand, who has made controversial disclosures about the tobacco industry, speaks with reporters outside of Federal Court, Monday, Jan. 31, 2005, in Washington. The Justice Department is suing the tobacco industry for $280 billion for conspiring to deceive the public about health risks associated with cigarettes.Wigand is a key government witness. (AP Photo/Lawrence Jackson)
Linda Tripp meets with reporters outside federal court in Washington Wednesday July 29,1 998 after her final appearence before a grand jury investigating an alleged affair between President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. From left are, attorney Anthony Zaccagnine, her daughter Allison, spokesman Phil Coughter and attorney Joe Murtha. (AP Photo/Khue Bui)
Whistle Blowers
Linda Tripp meets with reporters outside federal court in Washington Wednesday July 29,1 998 after her final appearence before a grand jury investigating an alleged affair between President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. From left are, attorney Anthony Zaccagnine, her daughter Allison, spokesman Phil Coughter and attorney Joe Murtha. (AP Photo/Khue Bui)
FBI Agent Coleen Rowley from the Minneapolis FBI field office testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday June 6, 2002 at the Capitol in Washington. The committee is investigating oversight on counterterrorism. In a 13-page memo, Rowley last month accused bureau headquarters of putting roadblocks in the way of Minneapolis field agents trying to investigate the foreign-born Moussaoui, who is charged with conspiring with the hijackers in the Sept. 11 attacks. (AP Photo/Joe Marquette)
Whistle Blowers
FBI Agent Coleen Rowley from the Minneapolis FBI field office testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday June 6, 2002 at the Capitol in Washington. The committee is investigating oversight on counterterrorism. In a 13-page memo, Rowley last month accused bureau headquarters of putting roadblocks in the way of Minneapolis field agents trying to investigate the foreign-born Moussaoui, who is charged with conspiring with the hijackers in the Sept. 11 attacks. (AP Photo/Joe Marquette)
**FILE** Enron Corp. executive Sherron Watkins is sworn in on Capitol Hill in a Thursday, Feb. 14, 2002, file photo, prior to testfying before a House Commerce subcommitte hearing on Enron. Watkins told the subcommittee that the chief financial officer Andrew Fastow, wanted her fired and her computer seized after she warned then-Chairman Kenneth Lay last summer that investors were being misled by inflated profit statements. Enron Corp. founder Kenneth Lay was convicted Thursday, May 25, 2006, of all six counts against him, including conspiracy to commit securities and wire fraud, in one of the biggest business scandals in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File)
Whistle Blowers
**FILE** Enron Corp. executive Sherron Watkins is sworn in on Capitol Hill in a Thursday, Feb. 14, 2002, file photo, prior to testfying before a House Commerce subcommitte hearing on Enron. Watkins told the subcommittee that the chief financial officer Andrew Fastow, wanted her fired and her computer seized after she warned then-Chairman Kenneth Lay last summer that investors were being misled by inflated profit statements. Enron Corp. founder Kenneth Lay was convicted Thursday, May 25, 2006, of all six counts against him, including conspiracy to commit securities and wire fraud, in one of the biggest business scandals in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File)

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