• Second to none: Kyle Larson hangs on to win at Fontana
    The Associated Press

    Second to none: Kyle Larson hangs on to win at Fontana

    Kyle Larson was second to nobody in his home state. Larson persevered through four late restarts to win at Fontana, adding his second career victory to his overall Monster Energy NASCAR Cup series points lead. ''Lots of fun to be Kyle Larson right now,'' Larson said with a grin.

  • Edsel Ford II to drive honorary pace car — a Ford, of course — at Martinsville
    NASCAR Talk

    Edsel Ford II to drive honorary pace car — a Ford, of course — at Martinsville

    While there’s no guarantee a Ford will win Sunday’s STP 500 at Martinsville Speedway, a Ford will definitely start it. Track officials announced Monday that Edsel Ford II, great-grandson of Ford Motor Company founder Henry Ford, will bring the field to the starting green flag as honorary pace car driver, behind the wheel of a Ford Shelby 350GT. “I was talking with (Ford) in Daytona and he mentioned to me that he had never been to Martinsville, so I figured what better way to welcome him than to invite him to be our honorary pace car driver,” Martinsville Speedway president Clay Campbell said in a release. Ford currently serves as a member of the auto manufacturer’s board of directors. “I’ve known

  • Kyle Larson's father thinks LaVar Ball is making his sons' lives harder
    USA Today

    Kyle Larson's father thinks LaVar Ball is making his sons' lives harder

    FONTANA, Calif. — Mike Larson hadn’t heard of LaVar Ball until two weeks ago, but a Twitter link to an article about the controversial father of now-ex UCLA basketball star Lonzo, LiAngelo and LaMelo fascinated him. The father of 24-year-old NASCAR standout Kyle Larson now reads any story he can find about the former NFL practice squad player. Mike Larson has seen “Little League parents” during his years supporting his son’s eventual career through go karting, sprint car racing and eventually stock cars. He’s seen parents live vicariously, destructively, through the exploits of their children. A low-key former power company employee from Northern California, Mike Larson said he couldn’t bring