#13 of 13 Most Popular Galleries of 2013: Tech Graveyards: Where Old Technology Goes to Die

By Claudine Zap

For technology geeks, it's out with the old and in with the new. But every new gadget acquired means that old tech gets trashed. What happens to all those junked cellphones, computer monitors and ancient laptops? Here, some tales of technology that's gone to the graveyard.

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Tech Graveyards

Tech Graveyards

Tech Graveyards

ÓFILE - In this Friday, June 20, 2008 file photo, a worker sorts electronic equipment for recycling at a factory for recycling electronics and electrical equipment in Mumbai, India. Sales of household electrical gadgets will boom across the developing world in the next decade, wreaking environmental havoc if there are no new strategies to deal with the discarded TVs, cell phones and computers, a U.N. report said Monday, Feb. 22, 2010. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh, file)

Tech Graveyards

5Piled up discarded computer parts lie in waiting in an area where much of the world's electronic-waste _ from cell phone chargers to mainframe computers _ ends up in Nanyang, Guiyu and other small towns like it in eastern China, Thursday March 16, 2006. Workers, many of them poorly paid migrants strip, smash and melt down circuit boards, mainly to extract the copper and other precious metals inside.The business has created massive pollution from leaded glass and other toxic materials. Such pollution could be mitigated by moves to recycle and properly dispose of so-called electronic waste that are gaining ground in the West. A European Union law requires manufacturers to recycle junk electronics free of charge, although policies in the United States are fragmented in different areas.(AP Photo/Elizabeth Dalziel)

Tech Graveyards

Cell phones are shown in a box Thursday, Oct. 30, 2003 to be sorted at ReCellular Inc., a Dexter, Mich., company that refurbishes or recycles old handsets collected by cell phone carriers. If predictions hold true, millions of cell phones will be put out to pasture starting in late November under a new rule allowing people to keep their phone numbers when switching cellular carriers. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Tech Graveyards

A man loads old computer monitors into a truck at a recycling village in Beijing, China, Tuesday, July 14, 2009. Many people in the village make a living by stripping old computer parts for recycling.(AP Photo/Greg Baker)

Tech Graveyard

3In this Aug. 27, 2009 photo, circuit boards fill a bin at a recycling center in Indianapolis, at Workforce Inc., a nonprofit electronics recycler that contracts with the city of Indianapolis to recycle electronic waste the city collects at hazardous household waste drop-off sites. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

Tech Graveyards

1Employees at Illinois Bells downtown Chicago service center add another phone to the pile and assist costumers lined up on Friday, Dec. 30, 1983, to exchange, repair or buy phones from Illinois Bell before it breaks off from AT&T on January 1. The average wait in line was 1½ hours. (AP Photo/Mark Elias)