Jeron Johnson

#32S,
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Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 212
Born:
College: Boise State
Birth Place: Compton, California
Draft: Undrafted
  • ProFootball Talk on NBC Sports

    Seahawks expecting fierce competition at running back in training camp

    The Seahawks are still searching for an answer in their backfield in the post-Marshawn Lynch era. Seattle struggled to find consistent success on the ground last season as injuries to Thomas Rawls, C.J. Prosise and Russell Wilson sapped much of the team’s rushing potential. Now with the addition of Eddie Lacy this offseason, the Seahawks are expecting a strong battle to ensue in the fight for roster spots.

  • Seattle sports teams join Athlete Ally to show support for LGBTQ equality
    espnW

    Seattle sports teams join Athlete Ally to show support for LGBTQ equality

    SEATTLE -- To kick off Pride Week in Seattle, the city's professional sports teams joined to show their support for LGBTQ equality. Representatives of the Seahawks, Mariners, Sounders, Storm and Reign gathered in downtown Seattle on Tuesday for a news conference with Athlete Ally, a nonprofit organization that seeks to foster inclusive sports communities. Reign and U.S. women's soccer player Megan Rapinoe said the show of unity was gratifying to her personally as a gay athlete, but she also lauded what it meant for athletes who may not be open about their sexuality. "I think it's incredibly important to make these steps and to show the athletes that might be in the closet that they are with support,"

  • Ranking the worst-to-first chances of the NFL's eight cellar dwellers in 2017
    CBS Sports

    Ranking the worst-to-first chances of the NFL's eight cellar dwellers in 2017

    The Dallas Cowboys did it last year. Washington did it the year before. The Carolina Panthers did it in 2013, and the Indianapolis Colts did it in 2012.  What are we talking about? Going from worst to first in a division. Almost every year, it seems like there's at least one division winner that finished in last place in that division the year before. In fact, it's happened 16 times since the NFL expanded to 32 teams and established eight four-team divisions back in 2002. (There have been 16 worst-to-firsts in 14 seasons, or 1.15 per year.)  With that in mind, we're here to rank 2016's last-place teams by how likely they are to win their division in 2017. In reverse order of likelihood (No. 8