• Pre-game reading: Bettman insists NHL isn’t ‘anti-Olympics’
    ProHockeyTalk5 hours ago

    Pre-game reading: Bettman insists NHL isn’t ‘anti-Olympics’

    — Up top, members of the Detroit Red Wings and their fans recall some of their fondest memories from Joe Louis Arena, which will host its last NHL game on Apr. 9. — Here’s NHL commissioner Gary Bettman, speaking Friday in Chicago: “The league isn’t anti-Olympics. The problem is, the clubs are anti-disruption to the season. To disappear for almost three weeks in February when there is no football and baseball and it’s only basketball and … there’s no programming for the NHL Network, for NHL.com (and) all of our social media platforms. … If somebody proposes something dramatic and radically different that gets the attention of the clubs where they say, ‘You know what? We don’t like going but on

  • Mario Lemieux is ‘fine’ with Josh Ho-Sang wearing number 66
    ProHockeyTalk

    Mario Lemieux is ‘fine’ with Josh Ho-Sang wearing number 66

    Believe it or not, many people have an issue with Islanders rookie Josh Ho-Sang wearing number 66, but it sounds like former Penguins great Mario Lemieux isn’t one of them. On Thursday, Lemieux made it clear that Ho-Sang using his number wasn’t an issue. “I’m fine with it,” Lemieux said via a spokesperson, per the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “It’s just a number. Number 4 and number 9 were worn by great players (Bobby Orr and Gordie Howe, respectively), and they are not retired forever. Players can choose whatever number they want.”  Unlike the number 99, the NHL hasn’t retired 66, which means any player can still use it. Some see it as a sign of disrespect, but Ho-Sang has made it clear that that’s

  • Russian-led Capitals bringing Washington together in quest for elusive Stanley Cup
    Sports Illustrated

    Russian-led Capitals bringing Washington together in quest for elusive Stanley Cup

    WASHINGTON-If you walked around the corner in front of the Verizon Center, the squawling of a Jimi-Hendrix-wannabe power trio drowned out the brassy swing of a second-line band that was playing up the block. As chaotic and cacophonic as this tableau sounds, in this most peculiar time in history, the Verizon Center may be the only place in the nation’s capital around which everybody is happy and where everything makes sense. The Washington Capitals are saving sanity in a place that desperately needs its sanity saved.