Who was the worst NBA player in 2021-22?

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Who was the worst NBA player in 2021-22? originally appeared on NBC Sports Boston

The best players in the NBA will take center stage during the playoffs after finishing out the regular season. Other players, however, will want to put this year in the rearview for all the wrong reasons.

Ten teams are already onto the offseason and turning their attention to the draft lottery. As could be expected, those bad teams had rosters with bad players.

MVP debates have become an exhausting exercise, and there is a distinction between “most valuable” and “best,” but the award is a tangible way of honoring the premier player from that season. But what is the best system for determining the worst player in the NBA, and who would get that dishonor this season?

Using three statistics, here’s a look at the players who had the roughest seasons:

Which NBA player had the worst net rating this season?

Net rating is one metric that could be used to quantify a player’s overall impact.

Net rating is determined by subtracting a player’s defensive rating from their offensive rating. Offensive rating is the number of points produced by a player per 100 individual possessions and defensive rating is the number of points allowed by a player per 100 individual possessions.

The player with the top net rating for 2021-22 is none other than … Ahmad Caver? The guard had an eye-popping 200.0 offensive rating and suffocating 66.7 defensive rating, giving him a net rating of 133.3. That number is pretty skewed, though, considering he logged just 0.8 minutes in his only appearance with the Indiana Pacers this season.

When it comes to players who are regular starters and rotation players, more noticeable names rise to the top. Jayson Tatum (12.1) led the league among those who played at least 41 games, followed by George Hill (11.7), Steph Curry (10.7) and Jae Crowder (10.2).

For the lowest net rating, the biggest number is tough to even comprehend. Sam Dekker had a -250.0 net rating, combining a 0.0 offensive rating with a -250.0 defensive rating. Like Caver, the number came in a minuscule sample size, as Dekker played just 0.9 minutes in his lone outing for the Toronto Raptors.

Here are the bottom 10 players ranked by net rating regardless of playing time:

1. Sam Dekker, Raptors: -250.0

2. Jordan Goodwin, Wizards: -110.0

3. Zylan Cheatham, Jazz: -106.8

T-4. Arnoldas Kulboka, Hornets: -100.0

T-4. CJ Miles, Celtics: -100.0

T-4. Joe Johnson, Celtics: -100.0

T-4. Matt Mooney, Knicks: -100.0

T-4. Tyler Hall, Knicks: -100.0

9. David Johnson, Raptors: -75.0

10. Jaden Springer, 76ers: -72.4

Here are the bottom 10 NBA players who logged at least 500 minutes ranked by net rating with one non-playoff team standing out:

1. Brandon Williams, Trail Blazers: -20.4

2. Keon Johnson, Trail Blazers: -19.0

3. Trendon Watford, Trail Blazers: -17.9

4. Greg Brown III, Trail Blazers: -17.6

5. Ignas Brazdeikis, Magic: -15.7

6. R.J. Hampton, Magic: -14.5

7. CJ Elleby, Trail Blazers: -14.3

8. Garrett Temple, Pelicans: -13.7

9. Ben McLemore, Trail Blazers: -13.1

10. Drew Eubanks, Trail Blazers: -12.8

Which NBA player had the worst PER this season?

John Hollinger created a formula in 2007 meant to capture a player’s overall impact on the game. His player efficiency rating (PER) uses positive accomplishments and negative accomplishments to calculate a player’s per-minute productivity. Hollinger sets the league average to 15.00 each season.

On the positive end, Nikola Jokic (32.94), Giannis Antetokounmpo (32.12) and Joel Embiid (31.24), the top three candidates for MVP, led the league in PER for the 2021-22 season.

On the lower end, Keifer Sykes (5.97) had the lowest PER among qualified players who logged at least 500 minutes. Here’s who ended the year in the bottom 10 for PER:

1. Keifer Sykes, Pacers: 5.97

2. Kent Bazemore, Lakers: 6.04

3. Tony Snell, Blazers/Pelicans: 6.37

4. Wesley Matthews, Bucks: 6.97

5. Joshua Primo, Spurs: 7.18

6. Rodney Hood, Bucks/Clippers: 7.20

7. Austin Rivers, Nuggets: 7.24

8. Aaron Nesmith, Celtics: 7.35

9. Maurice Harkless, Kings: 7.69

10. Isaiah Joe, 76ers: 7.71

Which NBA player had the worst true shooting percentage this season?

True shooting percentage measures shooting efficiency by accounting for 2-point field goal attempts, 3-point attempts and free throw attempts. Though it doesn’t account for the defensive side of the ball, true shooting percentage gives a glimpse at which players were the most effective and efficient scorers by lumping all types of shots into one statistic.

True shooting percentage favors forwards and centers whose shots predominantly come around the basket. Rudy Gobert (73.2%), Jarrett Allen (69.8%) and Montrezl Harrell (68.0%) led the league.

Conversely, the bottom of the list is filled with guards, as nine of the bottom 10 are backcourt players. Inexperience is also evident near the bottom of the true shooting list with four rookies in the bottom 10.

Here’s the full bottom 10 in true shooting percentage among qualified players.

1. Jalen Suggs, Magic: 45.5%

2. Nickeil Alexander-Walker, Pelicans/Jazz: 47.5%

3. Josh Giddey, Thunder: 47.8%

4. R.J. Hampton, Magic: 48.1%

5. Reggie Jackson, Clippers: 48.8%

6. Davion Mitchell, Kings: 48.9%

7. Cameron Payne, Suns: 50.0%

T-8. Chuma Okeke, Magic: 50.1%

T-8. Tre Mann, Thunder: 50.1%

10. Furkan Korkmaz, 76ers: 50.2%