'Wonder Woman' wasn't alone: 15 great movies dissed by 2018 Oscars

Yahoo Movies

Every Oscar season, a few dozen talented filmmakers get to watch their movies become the center of attention. The rest are not so lucky. With a total of 24 award categories (averaging five nominations each) to choose from, Academy voters inevitably let some of the year’s best movies go unrewarded. This year’s most talked-about snub is Wonder Woman, one of the biggest and best-reviewed films of 2017. But Patty Jenkins’s superhero opus is not the only great movie to slip through the Academy’s fingers. Click through to see the Yahoo Entertainment staff’s 15 favorite films that were overlooked by the 2018 Oscars, along with the nominations they rightly deserve. — by Ethan Alter, Kevin Polowy, Nick Schager, and Gwynne Watkins

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>The 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) and self-proclaimed “male chauvinist pig” Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell) was a publicity stunt that took on outsize signifiance against the backdrop of the feminist revolution. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris’s film captures both the thrill of the game and the astonishing obstacles King had to navigate to win it, while Stone and Carell turn in two of their finest performances.<br><b>Nomination it deserves: </b>Best Actress — Emma Stone<br>(Photo: Melinda Sue Gordon, Fox Searchlight Pictures/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Battle of the Sexes’

Why it’s great: The 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) and self-proclaimed “male chauvinist pig” Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell) was a publicity stunt that took on outsize signifiance against the backdrop of the feminist revolution. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris’s film captures both the thrill of the game and the astonishing obstacles King had to navigate to win it, while Stone and Carell turn in two of their finest performances.
Nomination it deserves: Best Actress — Emma Stone
(Photo: Melinda Sue Gordon, Fox Searchlight Pictures/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>A Civil War drama that takes place far from the battlefield, this Southern Gothic tale — about the residents of a girls’ boarding school in Virginia, whose lives are upended by the appearance of a wounded soldier (Colin Farrell) — is a gorgeous, indulgent period piece filled with sly commentary on gender and violence.<br><br><b>Nomination it deserves: </b>Best Director — Sofia Coppola<br><br>Photo: Ben Rothstein/Focus Features/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘The Beguiled’

Why it’s great: A Civil War drama that takes place far from the battlefield, this Southern Gothic tale — about the residents of a girls’ boarding school in Virginia, whose lives are upended by the appearance of a wounded soldier (Colin Farrell) — is a gorgeous, indulgent period piece filled with sly commentary on gender and violence.

Nomination it deserves: Best Director — Sofia Coppola

Photo: Ben Rothstein/Focus Features/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>An Asian-American man (John Cho) goes to tend to his ailing father in Columbus, Ind., where he develops a unique friendship with a local Caucasian girl (Haley Lu Richardson) who takes him to see the city’s many unique architectural wonders. One-name director Kogonada’s debut film is an understated, gorgeously composed drama about ambition, responsibility, and seeing the beauty beneath ordinary surfaces.<br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Director — Kogonada<br><br>(Photo: Superlative Films/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Columbus’

Why it’s great: An Asian-American man (John Cho) goes to tend to his ailing father in Columbus, Ind., where he develops a unique friendship with a local Caucasian girl (Haley Lu Richardson) who takes him to see the city’s many unique architectural wonders. One-name director Kogonada’s debut film is an understated, gorgeously composed drama about ambition, responsibility, and seeing the beauty beneath ordinary surfaces.

Nomination it deserves: Best Director — Kogonada

(Photo: Superlative Films/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

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<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>Mixing archival photographs with unearthed footage from silent-film-era nitrate prints recovered from the titular Arctic Circle mining town, Bill Morrison beautifully weaves together the story of Dawson City’s boom-and-bust years. In doing so, he breathes new life into the flickering imagery of a vanished past.<br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Documentary Feature<br><br>Photo: Kino Lorner/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Dawson City: Frozen Time’

Why it’s great: Mixing archival photographs with unearthed footage from silent-film-era nitrate prints recovered from the titular Arctic Circle mining town, Bill Morrison beautifully weaves together the story of Dawson City’s boom-and-bust years. In doing so, he breathes new life into the flickering imagery of a vanished past.

Nomination it deserves: Best Documentary Feature

Photo: Kino Lorner/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>A thought-provoking commentary on intercontinental (and interspecies) communication wrapped in the guise of a spirited “girl and her giant pig” adventure, <i>Okja </i>is what all global blockbuster cinema should aspire to be. Cinematic fusion food par excellence, it’s a little <i>Old Yeller</i>, a little <i>Fast Food Nation, </i>and all terrific. <br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Director — Bong Joon-ho<br><br>Photo: Netflix/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Okja’

Why it’s great: A thought-provoking commentary on intercontinental (and interspecies) communication wrapped in the guise of a spirited “girl and her giant pig” adventure, Okja is what all global blockbuster cinema should aspire to be. Cinematic fusion food par excellence, it’s a little Old Yeller, a little Fast Food Nation, and all terrific.

Nomination it deserves: Best Director — Bong Joon-ho

Photo: Netflix/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great:</b> The year’s most underrated sci-fi film tells the story of an elderly woman (Lois Smith) who spends her final days speaking to a holographic projection of her late husband (John Hamm) — a routine then duplicated by her daughter (Geena Davis) and son-in-law (Tim Robbins) — in this complex, heartbreaking meditation on memory and mortality.<br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Actress — Lois Smith<br><br>(Photo: Sean Price Williams/FilmRise/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Marjorie Prime’

Why it’s great: The year’s most underrated sci-fi film tells the story of an elderly woman (Lois Smith) who spends her final days speaking to a holographic projection of her late husband (John Hamm) — a routine then duplicated by her daughter (Geena Davis) and son-in-law (Tim Robbins) — in this complex, heartbreaking meditation on memory and mortality.

Nomination it deserves: Best Actress — Lois Smith

(Photo: Sean Price Williams/FilmRise/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>Like this year’s Oscar favorite <i>Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, </i>Macon Blair’s directorial debut is a profane, darkly comic revenge film set in small-town America. But unlike Frances McDormand’s take-no-prisoners protagonist, the petty-larceny victim played by Melanie Lynskey is a sweet optimist who’s depressed, fed up, and eminently relatable.<br><br><b>Nomination it deserves</b>: Best Original Screenplay — Macon Blair<br><br>(Photo: Allyson Riggs / Netflix/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore’

Why it’s great: Like this year’s Oscar favorite Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Macon Blair’s directorial debut is a profane, darkly comic revenge film set in small-town America. But unlike Frances McDormand’s take-no-prisoners protagonist, the petty-larceny victim played by Melanie Lynskey is a sweet optimist who’s depressed, fed up, and eminently relatable.

Nomination it deserves: Best Original Screenplay — Macon Blair

(Photo: Allyson Riggs / Netflix/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b><i>Wonder Woman </i>was the year’s biggest superhero movie, but most of its audience missed out on Angela Robinson’s smart, sexy biopic about the character’s real-life origins. Luke Evans stars as William Moulton Marston, who created Wonder Woman in 1941 as a tribute to his brilliant wife (Rebecca Hall) and their mutual lover (Bella Heathcote). <br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Supporting Actress <span>— Bella Heathcoate</span><br><br>(Photo: Claire Folger Annapurna Pictures/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Professor Marston and the Wonder Women’

Why it’s great: Wonder Woman was the year’s biggest superhero movie, but most of its audience missed out on Angela Robinson’s smart, sexy biopic about the character’s real-life origins. Luke Evans stars as William Moulton Marston, who created Wonder Woman in 1941 as a tribute to his brilliant wife (Rebecca Hall) and their mutual lover (Bella Heathcote).

Nomination it deserves: Best Supporting Actress — Bella Heathcoate

(Photo: Claire Folger Annapurna Pictures/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><strong>Why it’s great:</strong> If it were any other year, Annette Bening would be a surefire Oscar contender for her poignant portrayal of Gloria Grahame (the film noir legend who inspired Bening’s <em>Grifters</em> performance 17 years earlier) and Grahame’s romance with a young British thespian (Jamie Bell) prior to her death from breast cancer in 1981. Considering Bening is 0 for 4 at the Big Show, she might have even been favorited to win.<br><br><strong>Nomination it deserves:</strong> Best Actress <span>— </span>Annette Bening<br><br>(Photo: Sony Pictures Classics/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’

Why it’s great: If it were any other year, Annette Bening would be a surefire Oscar contender for her poignant portrayal of Gloria Grahame (the film noir legend who inspired Bening’s Grifters performance 17 years earlier) and Grahame’s romance with a young British thespian (Jamie Bell) prior to her death from breast cancer in 1981. Considering Bening is 0 for 4 at the Big Show, she might have even been favorited to win.

Nomination it deserves: Best Actress Annette Bening

(Photo: Sony Pictures Classics/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great:</b> If you can survive the film’s brutal opening sequence (warning all parents), Scott Cooper’s profound and beautifully shot western about an Army captain (a predictably terrific Christian Bale) forced to transport a Native American chief (Wes Studi) across treacherous lands — despite their nasty personal history — ultimately pays some handsome rewards. <br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Actor <span>— </span><span>Christian Bale</span><br><br>(Photo: Lorey Sebastian/Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Hostiles’

Why it’s great: If you can survive the film’s brutal opening sequence (warning all parents), Scott Cooper’s profound and beautifully shot western about an Army captain (a predictably terrific Christian Bale) forced to transport a Native American chief (Wes Studi) across treacherous lands — despite their nasty personal history — ultimately pays some handsome rewards.

Nomination it deserves: Best Actor Christian Bale

(Photo: Lorey Sebastian/Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great:</b> It’s excruciatingly uncomfortable to watch at points and suffers from some structural issues, but Kathryn Bigelow’s gut-wrenching drama is a deeply effective portrait of the troubling historical cycle of police brutality and the law’s lack of accountability for it. The film’s young ensemble is top-to-bottom great, but no one’s better than Will Poulter as the most despicable of offending cops. <br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Supporting Actor — Will Poulter<br><br>(Photo: Annapurna Distribution/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Detroit’

Why it’s great: It’s excruciatingly uncomfortable to watch at points and suffers from some structural issues, but Kathryn Bigelow’s gut-wrenching drama is a deeply effective portrait of the troubling historical cycle of police brutality and the law’s lack of accountability for it. The film’s young ensemble is top-to-bottom great, but no one’s better than Will Poulter as the most despicable of offending cops.

Nomination it deserves: Best Supporting Actor — Will Poulter

(Photo: Annapurna Distribution/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>Florence Pugh delivered 2017’s most ferocious big-screen performance as a young 19th-century woman who, stuck in a miserable arranged marriage in the middle of the English countryside, strikes back in ways both devious and demented. <br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Actress — Florence Pugh<br><br>(Photo: <span>Roadside Attractions/Courtesy of Everett Collection)</span> </p>
‘Lady Macbeth’

Why it’s great: Florence Pugh delivered 2017’s most ferocious big-screen performance as a young 19th-century woman who, stuck in a miserable arranged marriage in the middle of the English countryside, strikes back in ways both devious and demented.

Nomination it deserves: Best Actress — Florence Pugh

(Photo: Roadside Attractions/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>Once a vampire heartthrob, now a shady bank robber on the run through Queens, N.Y.: It’s a delight to see Robert Pattinson’s true weirdness emerge in the Safdie brothers’ sleazy, raucous crime film. <br><br><b>Nomination it deserves: </b>Best Actor — Robert Pattinson<br><br>(Photo: <span>A24/Courtesy of Everett Collection)</span> </p>
‘Good Time’

Why it’s great: Once a vampire heartthrob, now a shady bank robber on the run through Queens, N.Y.: It’s a delight to see Robert Pattinson’s true weirdness emerge in the Safdie brothers’ sleazy, raucous crime film.

Nomination it deserves: Best Actor — Robert Pattinson

(Photo: A24/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b>While <i>Wonder Woman</i> got the kudos, this film might have been the best DC Comics-based movie of 2018. The laugh-a-minute farce was loaded with <a href="https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/the-lego-batman-movie-easter-eggs-dark-knight-suicide-squad-batman-v-superman-230559811.html" data-ylk="slk:Easter eggs;outcm:mb_qualified_link;_E:mb_qualified_link" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Easter eggs</a>, inside jokes, <a href="https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/yes-there-is-a-condiment-king-a-field-guide-to-the-oddball-characters-of-the-lego-batman-movie-222732187.html" data-ylk="slk:and Batman arcana for Dark Knight fans of all ages;outcm:mb_qualified_link;_E:mb_qualified_link" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">and <em>Batman</em> arcana for Dark Knight fans of all ages</a> (they has us at Condiment King). Will Arnett might just be the best <em>Batman </em>ever.<br><br><strong>Nomination it deserves:</strong> Best Animated Feature<br><br>(Photo: Warner Bros.) </p>
‘The Lego Batman Movie’

Why it’s great: While Wonder Woman got the kudos, this film might have been the best DC Comics-based movie of 2018. The laugh-a-minute farce was loaded with Easter eggs, inside jokes, and Batman arcana for Dark Knight fans of all ages (they has us at Condiment King). Will Arnett might just be the best Batman ever.

Nomination it deserves: Best Animated Feature

(Photo: Warner Bros.)

<p><b>Why it’s great: </b><a href="https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/razzies-nominations-jennifer-lawrence-tom-cruise-baywatch-among-hollywoods-worst-143850656.html" data-ylk="slk:At least the Razzies;outcm:mb_qualified_link;_E:mb_qualified_link" class="link rapid-noclick-resp"><span>At least the Razzies</span></a> recognized the oddball audacity of Darren Aronofsky’s hyper-stylized fever dream. Here’s hoping that the years prove kinder to <i>Mother</i>‘svirtuoso mixture of biblical allegory and dark comedy, acted out by a terrific ensemble. <br><br><b>Nomination it deserves:</b> Best Supporting Actress — Michelle Pfeiffer <br><br>(Photo: Paramount Pictures/Courtesy of Everett Collection) </p>
‘Mother!’

Why it’s great: At least the Razzies recognized the oddball audacity of Darren Aronofsky’s hyper-stylized fever dream. Here’s hoping that the years prove kinder to Mother‘svirtuoso mixture of biblical allegory and dark comedy, acted out by a terrific ensemble.

Nomination it deserves: Best Supporting Actress — Michelle Pfeiffer

(Photo: Paramount Pictures/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

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