Why Trea Turner’s ‘jealous’ of Loudoun South, LLWS competitors

When Trea Turner sees the Little League World Series – or even thinks about it – there's one feeling that comes to mind: Jealousy.

"I always wanted to go to this tournament," he told NBC Sports Washington's Todd Dybas. "Tried every year. We had some good teams and made some good runs, but never got a chance. I'm a little jealous."

The team is in Pittsburgh this week – a nearly 200 mile drive from where Virginia's Loudoun South Little League team is looking to advance after two impressive no-hitters. And while it might be a longshot for them to make it to the big leagues one day Turner wasn't the only current Nationals player whose dream started back in Little League.

Scroll to continue with content
Ad

Turner played in Little League from the age of five to 13. "My dad coached," he said. "Most of my best friends to this day are still from of that age group and their fathers as well were coaches." They were a close-knit group, he said.

Erick Fedde remembers his time in Little League – as a catcher. "I didn't really pitch much until my sophomore year of high school," he said. "Everybody pitches when they're little. I think I was playing left field or something. I was always like I want to pitch [in high school], but I don't want to tell the coach."

Luckily, his mom intervened. 

"My mom pushed me," he said. "[She told me] ‘you should tell them you want to pitch.'"

Hunter Strickland's dad also coached him in Little League – and seeing the Little League kids, he said, brings back memories with his dad and brothers. "He definitely pushed us," he said of his dad as a coach. "But, I respect it. It's made us into the people we are today. It makes you a better player, a better person just from the discipline."

Andrew Stevenson played in the Little League World Series in 2005 with his team from Lafayette, La. His heroics in a game against a team from Kentucky lead the Associated Press roundup of the tournament at the time. He scored the winning run after making it to first on a bunt single and then getting to home from third on a throwing error.

"He may be the fastest player up here," his team manager, Mike Conrad, told the AP at the time.

MORE NATIONALS NEWS:

 

Why Trea Turners jealous of Loudoun South, LLWS competitors originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

What to Read Next