Why A's players don't mind trade-offs with extended protective netting

Brodie Brazil
NBC Sports BayArea

OAKLAND -- Back in December, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred declared that all 30 ballparks will extend their existing protective netting in advance of the 2020 season.
 
The movement has its reservations among fans but seems universally supported among players. Even in Oakland, where ample foul ground already buys added insurance.
 
"It will be tougher to interact with the fans, maybe to throw a ball to them," A's shortstop Marcus Semien said Friday at the team's media day. "I love throwing a baseball to a kid. But, at least they will be safe."



An NBC News investigation last year found at least 808 reports of fan injuries from baseballs from 2012 through 2019. The total was "based on lawsuits, news reports, social media postings and information from the contractors that provide first aid stations at MLB stadiums."
 
On May 29 in Houston, Chicago Cubs outfielder Albert Almora Jr. lined a foul ball that struck a two-year-old girl in the head. Earlier this month, an attorney representing her family told the Houston Chronicle that the girl suffered a permanent brain injury, remains subject to seizures and might need to stay on medication for the rest of her life.
 
"It sucks, and I don't want to see it anymore," third baseman Matt Chapman said. "I've seen fans looking at their phones, not paying attention. I've seen people holding babies and not paying attention."
 
Chapman understands the inconvenience but predicts eventual workarounds to make sure fans get their access, yet remain protected in critical situations. 





"I don't understand why fan safety would be a bad thing," he said.
 
In an era where exit velocities are measured with extreme precision, it's scary to know that a baseball traveling 100 miles per hour could be headed straight towards someone who might not be able to protect themselves.

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Even if they are paying attention to every pitch.
 
"We hit the ball so hard," Semien said. "And sometimes we're a little early. Or late. And now that they are up by the dugouts, you just say, 'Thank you the nets are there because that could have been bad.' "
 
Even pitchers realize the dangers of line drives in foul territory. Starter Mike Fiers spends a lot of time in road dugouts, where he and other players often remark about how close young kids are sitting to the action.
 
"They're in a bad spot," Fiers said. "I feel like a lot of people don't know that. It's tough when those foul balls go in because everyone always watches and hopes nobody gets hit."





[RELATED: A's teammates 'respect' Fiers for outing Astros' scandal]
 
As if there weren't already enough thoughts running through the typical MLB hitter's mind, the concept of additional netting should at least take risk out of the equation. 
 
"No one wants to be that guy who hits a ball in the stands and hits somebody," A's manager Bob Melvin said. "Our fans are baseball's lifeline. You have younger kids in there. It's a nightmare to think about. I think all players are in favor of that."



Why A's players don't mind trade-offs with extended protective netting originally appeared on NBC Sports Bay Area

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