Why Mets owner Steve Cohen has no plans to log off Twitter: 'I think people like it'

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Steve Cohen talks to media at Nationals Park
Steve Cohen talks to media at Nationals Park

Mets owner Steve Cohen (@StevenACohen2) has developed a strong relationship with fans on Twitter since re-joining the platform in November of 2020 as he was completing the purchase of the franchise.

Cohen has amassed over 227,100 followers and has been very vocal about the ballclub, even calling them out for struggling at the plate during their August slump. During Friday's introductory news conference for newly hired GM Billy Eppler, Cohen was asked about his Twitter activity and what fans can expect from him this season.

"I don't know, it's hard to say, maybe it was novel, right," Cohen said. "Owners haven't really done much of that. It was new, it was novel. I was trying to connect with the fans. I actually think I was pretty successful in that. Just getting feedback back from people from the ballpark and around the area, saying they really enjoy it and they actually appreciate that type of interaction with the owner.

"Twitter is a tough place to do it in general because it tends to be combative, as you know. All of you tweeting out there, you know what the comments are. It's a tough place to get your message across. So, we'll see. I'm a busy guy and a lot of that was during COVID. I'll continue to tweet, probably not as much as I did previously. Especially during the search, I wanted to respect the candidacies of the potential people we were talking to. Didn't want to make it a public search, didn't want to turn this into a game of some kind."

Cohen learned first hand how combative Twitter can be in January during the GameStop stock boom. He decided to deactivate his account after receiving numerous tweets that he considered "personal threats" towards him and his family. He rejoined Twitter as the MLB season began to start up, and asked a number of engaging questions to fans throughout the season.

Cohen told reporters on Friday that he did his best to stay off social media during the GM hiring process, but intends to keep tweeting in some capacity this season.

"Now in the end, the media is interested in finding out what we're doing and so it becomes a public search and I was trying to keep it as private as possible. I try to stay off of Twitter as part of that, and so now that it's over I'll probably get back on and give it another shot, see how it goes. We'll see. I think people like it, so why not keep going."