Why A's Lou Trivino feels bad for minor league players during MLB halt

Brian Witt
NBC Sports BayArea

Editor's Note: NBC Sports California spoke with Lou Trivino on Friday, May 22, four days before the A's announced they would stop paying $400 weekly stipends to their minor league players for the remainder of the season, and other teams released players.

For reasons of sanity and economy, the return of Major League Baseball this summer is the primary focus of the league and the players' association.

But A's reliever Lou Trivino also realizes the entire minor league ecosystem would suffer in a multitude of ways, potentially going dormant.

At this point, there are no imminent plans for 242 farm teams and its players across the continent.

"You feel bad for those guys," Trivino said. "Especially the ones that need the development, that need the reps."

Most big league players have the advantages of time and accessibility to personal training facilities. They can stay conditioned during shutdowns, without much setback.

But it's not the same for everyone.

"Some of these minor league guys, they've been stuck inside all day and not maybe able to do stuff," Trivino said. "That really hinders their ability to perform on the field next year."

Another lesser-discussed aspect to keep an eye on is MLB's annual amateur draft, which has been reduced from 40 rounds to five rounds.

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"You're not going to see the 11th round guy like myself maybe make it," Trivino said. "You're not going to see the late-round guys potentially get that chance and that's heartbreaking. I'm that guy."

Trivino started his minor league career in 2013, appearing in 170 games as a starter and reliever at every level, until getting his first chance at the major leagues with Oakland in 2019.

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Why A's Lou Trivino feels bad for minor league players during MLB halt originally appeared on NBC Sports Bay Area

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