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White Sox join woefully historic company with 100 games remaining

White Sox join woefully historic company with 100 games remaining originally appeared on NBC Sports Chicago

The Chicago White Sox have tied their franchise record for consecutive losses in a single season, but with 100 games to go in the campaign, they’re facing down a potentially historic campaign.

After Wednesday’s loss to the Chicago Cubs, which propelled them to a 13-game losing streak, the White Sox sit at 15-47 on the season, leaving them 100 games to turn things around.

That 62-game mark is good for a .242 winning percentage, but it also lands them in some pretty ignoble company.

According to Baseball Reference’s Stathead tool, only 11 teams have won 15 or fewer games in their first 62 contests since 1901.

The worst start in that span belongs to the 1904 Washington Senators, who went 11-48-3 in their first 62 games. The 2023 Oakland Athletics and the 1932 Boston Red Sox went 12-50 over that span, giving them .194 winning percentages.

That Athletics squad ultimately went 50-112 in the regular season, a mark the White Sox are currently on pace to finish well short of.

Currently, the White Sox are on pace to win just 39 games, which would be fewer than the 41 wins racked up by the 1962 New York Mets, who hold the distinction of the most losses in a single season with 120.

The team with the worst winning percentage in a full 162-game season was the 2003 Detroit Tigers, who went 43-119, according to MLB records.

More immediately, the White Sox will need to do something about their current losing streak, which stands at 13 games. That ties the 1924 squad for the longest single-season streak in White Sox history, and they’ll try to avoid breaking that record when they face the Boston Red Sox at Guaranteed Rate Field on Thursday night.

The record for most consecutive losses by the White Sox was set between the 1967 and 1968 seasons, when the South Siders lost 15 games in a row.

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