Washington DC launches bid to host 2026 FIFA World Cup matches

Matt Weyrich
NBC Sports Washington

It's still six years out, but Washington, D.C. is making a push to bring the 2026 FIFA World Cup to the nation's capital.

With North America selected as the location of choice for the 2026 World Cup rather than one country in particular, D.C. officials announced Tuesday their intention to make Washington one of the 16 host cities for the 80-match tournament.

"Right now, as countries around the world continue to respond to this pandemic, the 2026 FIFA World Cup is something we can all look forward to," D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said in a statement. "And when the tournament comes to North America, it only makes sense for DC - the Sports Capital and District of Champions - to host. We are already a city united by the game, and in 2026, we look forward to uniting the world."

According to The Washington Post, 10 cities from the U.S. are expected to land matches for the tournament with Canada and Mexico splitting the other six. It will be the first time in World Cup history that the tournament will be shared by more than two countries.

The District established a group called DC2026, which announced a 40-member advisory board that includes D.C. United goalkeeper Bill Hamid, three-time MLS champion Eddie Pope, Washington Spirit stars Joanna Lohman and Andi Sullivan, two-time gold medalist Brianna Scurry, EventsDC chairman Max Brown, chef José Andrés and D.C. United general partner Gregory O'Dell.

"As a native Washingtonian, I am proud to be a Co-Chair of DC's official bid committee to host the 2026 FIFA World Cup," Hamid said in a statement. "I could not think of a more vibrant, inclusive or passionate soccer city to host FIFA World Cup matches in 2026. With our deep soccer roots and diversity, the culture of our city gives us our foundation to successfully highlight the matches and leave a lasting impact on the future of the game."

DC2026 plans to tout D.C.'s "unparalleled roots to the sport of soccer and world-class hosting capabilities" as part of its pitch. In a three-page press release, the group laid out advantages such as the metro system and three local airports that would allow it to host the increased number of tourists.

The city last hosted the World Cup in 1994, when it made RFK Stadium one of nine U.S. venues for the tournament. It's also held Olympic soccer games (1996) as well as the 1999 and 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.

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Washington DC launches bid to host 2026 FIFA World Cup matches originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

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