U.S. Tourists Can Now Travel to Italy without Quarantining

·2 min read

Good news for travelers who have been dreaming of a summer on the Amalfi coast or in the rolling hills of Tuscany: Italy has officially reopened to American tourists for quarantine-free travel. 

Italian health minister Roberto Speranza announced that Italy will allow the entry of travelers from the United States under the requirements of the E.U.'s Green Certificate. That means U.S. travelers who can provide proof of vaccination, a certificate of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative PCR- or rapid-antigen test taken within 48 hours of arrival can travel to Italy without observing an isolation period on arrival. The new entry requirements are effective as of June 21.

Until now, Italy had only been partially open to Americans who were willing to isolate on arrival, or able to take several COVID tests. The nation had approved so-called “COVID-tested flights," operated by U.S. airlines such as Delta, that allowed U.S. passengers to visit from 10 designated air hubs if they tested prior to departure, upon boarding, and at arrival. If all tests came back negative, travelers didn't need to isolate; U.S. travelers arriving on standard flights were subject to a quarantine period upon arrival.

Under the new rules, "Those vaccinated in the U.S.A. can prove this via the ‘white card’ bearing a CDC logo," according to the Italian Embassy in United States. Delta says that in addition to presenting documents like proof of vaccination, recovery, or a negative test result, its customers traveling to Italy are still required to pre-register and fill out an E.U. Digital Passenger Locator form before boarding.

Tourists from Canada and Japan were also cleared for travel Italy with no isolation period. This week Italian officials also implemented a five-day quarantine for visitors from the U.K., and extended entry bans for travelers from India, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh.

Italy is the latest E.U. country to welcome back Americans for quarantine-free travel, following a recent recommendation by E.U. officials to lift travel restrictions for the United States. In recent weeks Denmark, Greece, and France have similarly reopened to U.S. visitors without requiring isolation. 

Additionally, more countries in the region are rolling out the E.U. Green Certificate, which paves the way for widespread tourism within Europe and from other countries approved on an ad hoc basis. All E.U. member countries are expected to have adopted use of the Green Certificate by July 1.

Originally Appeared on Condé Nast Traveler