Trackhouse purchases Chip Ganassi Racing

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On Wednesday, it was announced that Trackhouse Racing, co-owned by Justin Marks and musician Pitbull, purchased Chip Ganassi Racing's (CGR) Cup assets and will field two cars in 2022.

Trackhouse will take over operations at the end of the 2021 Cup season.

In addition to buying the assets of CGR, Trackhouse will acquire the team's two charters. During the announcement, Daniel Suarez was confirmed as one of the drivers for next season. The second driver will be announced later in the year and Marks said that the current CGR drivers Kurt Busch and Ross Chastain are on the short list.

Busch, a 21-year veteran in the Cup Series, is currently in the final year of his contract with CGR. In his career, Busch has raced for six different owners, including Jack Roush and Roger Penske.

Chastain raced full time in 2018 and 2019, was part time in 2020, and assumed the ride that Kyle Larson held during the first years of his career.

The team will operate out of the Ganassi Concord, North Carolina shops in 2022, but intends to move operations to Nashville, Tennessee in 2023.

In a statement, Ganassi said: "I can honestly say that my NASCAR team was not for sale. Justin simply came to me with a great offer and an even better vision."

Ganassi has had a respectable season.

Busch earned top-10s in two of the first three races this year, but lost his consistency as the season progressed. He fell off the radar of most bettors and gamers as weeks without a top-10 accumulated. But, Busch reversed that trend at Sonoma with a sixth-place finish on the road course and backed it up with another pair of solid top-10 runs at Nashville and Pocono.

Chastain has also come on strong in recent weeks with a top-five at the Circuit of the Americas and a top-10 at Sonoma. He challenged Larson for the Ally 400 win at Nashville, which would have secured a playoff berth, before finishing second.

And Suarez has run well also. In the first year of operation for this team, Suarez has three top-10 finishes. He was in contention to win on the Bristol Motor Speedway Dirt Track - in part, undoubtedly, because of team owner Marks' experience on dirt. Suarez has top-15 finishes in his last five starts.

While the impact will likely take time to be revealed, it is likely that the performance of all three drivers will be elevated slightly. Suarez gets the boost of knowing that enhanced assets will soon be at his disposal. Chastain and Busch will be racing for a job - or, if Busch decides not to race for a seventh different driver and retires at the age of 43, he'll want to leave the series on a high note.

This is the second big announcement involving a 2022 driver change. Earlier this year rumors began to circulate that Brad Keselowski might leave Team Penske and assume an ownership and driver's role at Roush-Fenway Racing.

“Being at this moment right now, it does truly feel like just another part of a great motorsports story,” Marks said. “There’s a lot of work to do for us at Trackhouse, but there’s a lot of enthusiasm to do that work.”

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