Top 50 College Receivers of 2019

Hayden Winks
Rotoworld
Christopher Crawford takes a look at the top headlines from the previous week in college football in the latest Weekly Update. (Getty Images)

CFB Storylines of the Week

Christopher Crawford takes a look at the top headlines from the previous week in college football in the latest Weekly Update. (Getty Images)

Notes: These are not college fantasy football or NFL Draft rankings. They are meant to be judging college football performance. ... "YTOP" is yards per team offensive play. It's a good stat because it balances volume with efficiency while taking some of the quarterback's talent out of the equation. This is my favorite stat to loosely compare players across teams and conferences. ... "FPPG" is fantasy points per game. It's useful because it's a volume stat and good players get more volume. ... "ReYD PG" is receiving yards per game. Yardage is more stable than touchdowns are, so that's why it is listed. ... Now, let's get into the rankings!

 

Tier 1

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Tier 1 receivers are borderline unguardable at the college level and are potential NFL WR1s and WR2s. This class, in particular, is ridiculous.

Rank

Tier 1 Receivers

YTOP

FPPG

ReYD PG

1

Laviska Shenault Jr. (Colorado, JR)

1.16

24.8

112

2

Jerry Jeudy (Alabama, JR)

1.30

18.9

88

3

Rondale Moore (Purdue, SO)

1.38

24.0

97

4

Tylan Wallace (Oklahoma State, JR)

1.47

23.6

115

5

Justyn Ross (Clemson, SO)

0.93

14.3

71

6

CeeDee Lamb (Oklahoma, JR)

0.87

17.6

83

7

Jalen Reagor (TCU, JR)

1.17

17.9

82

8

Tee Higgins (Clemson, JR)

0.87

15.0

62

9

Henry Ruggs (Alabama, JR)

0.73

13.3

53

 

Laviska Shenault, who played just over half of his snaps in the slot, led college football with 9.6 receptions per game last season. That happened to be the second-most receptions per game among sophomore receivers since at least 2000 (Davante Adams). Shenault did so by catching a whopping 81% of his targets, which also led returning FBS receivers with at least 85 targets. But Shenault was able to create after the catch, too. According to Pro Football Focus, Shenault only trailed Rondale Moore in yards after the catch (639) among Power 5 receivers. As a bonus, Shenault can effectively run the wildcat in short-yardage situations and blocks his tail off. What a stud.

Primary slot receiver Jerry Jeudy had the second-most receiving yards (1,315) and the second-most 25+ yard receptions among returning FBS receivers last year. What makes Jeudy unguardable is his speed -- he’ll probably run sub-4.35 at the Combine -- and his unbelievable route running, a combination that makes him one of the best deep targets and arguably the best receiver over the middle in college football. Jeudy is not the favorite to lead the country in receiving -- there are a lot of mouths to feed at Alabama as you’ll see -- but he deserves to be the slight favorite for the first receiver off the board in the 2020 NFL Draft because of his talent.

Slot receiver Rondale Moore had the second-most receptions (114) among freshmen receivers since at least 2000 (Michael Crabtree). The freshman had the third-highest team share of receptions (22%) in 2018 among returning FBS players, and after he caught a pass, Moore was electric. According to Pro Football Focus, Moore led college football in yards after the catch (892), averaging 7.8 yards after the catch per reception. Moore also led FBS receivers in fantasy points, narrowly beating Tylan Wallace for the top spot. Not a bad start to his collegiate career. If there’s room to grow, it’s in terms of expanding his route tree beyond 10 yards, but he’s still an elite college player without it.

Tylan Wallace had the most receiving yards (1,491), receiving yards per game (114.7), and first downs (67) among returning FBS receivers last year. Wallace also had the most yards on targets of 20+ yards, according to Pro Football Focus. There are few, if any, that can win at all depths of the field at the rate Wallace does. Wallace is a favorite to lead the country in receiving yards per game.

Justyn Ross is Pro Football Focus’ highest-ranked returning receiver, which is incredible since he was just a freshman last year. Ross did so by posting the highest yards per reception (21.7), the most yards after catch per reception average (9.6), and by logging the highest yards per route run among returning FBS receivers. With Trevor Lawrence expected to play like the best or second-best quarterback` in college football, Ross should absolutely destroy in 2019 and 2020.

CeeDee Lamb finished second in quarterback rating when targeted last year, partially due to his success downfield. Lamb averaged over 20 yards per target on passes that traveled 20 yards past the line of scrimmage. It’s his combination of athleticism and ball tracking that makes him an elite college receiver and first-round NFL prospect.

Jalen Reagor is one of the best receivers to the intermediate and deep parts of the field. Reagor had 11 plays of 25+ yards last year, placing him near the top 10 among returning FBS receivers. But his quickness and lateral ability also make him a threat at the line of scrimmage. Clearly the best offensive player on TCU, Reagor will be getting schemed against every week, but he’ll still be one of the most productive players in the country. If you are on #TeamSeparation, then you are on #TeamReagor.

Tee Higgins had one of the lowest drop rates among Power 5 receivers, but he’s also explosive and physical. In the red zone last year, Higgins scored on eight of his 11 receptions, giving him the second-most RZ touchdowns among returning FBS receivers. Higgins can also win between the 20s, especially as a lid-lifter and over the middle. His size (6’4/210), athleticism, and basketball background jump off the screen.

Henry Ruggs finished with an elite 8.3 yards after the catch per reception last year, and that’s not surprising if you’ve seen him run. What was surprising to me was how Alabama used Ruggs last year. According to Pro Football Focus, only 14% of his targets last year were on passes that traveled more than 20 yards downfield. I’m guessing that number goes up this season with another offseason to work on the technical aspects of the position.

Tier 2

Tier 2 receivers are NFL prospects -- some of them in 2021 however -- and are a threat for 100 yards and a score in most games. Most of the sophomores listed here will be next year’s Tier 1 receivers.

 

Rank

Tier 2 Receivers

YTOP

FPPG

ReYD PG

10

Tyler Johnson (Minnesota, SR)

1.35

20.5

90

11

Kalija Lipscomb (Vanderbilt, SR)

1.08

17.9

70

12

Amon-Ra St. Brown (USC, SO)

0.94

13.9

68

13

Jaylen Waddle (Alabama, SO)

0.84

11.5

57

14

Devonta Smith (Alabama, JR)

0.69

11.3

53

15

KJ Hamler (Penn State, SO)

0.84

11.3

58

16

J.D. Spielman (Nebraska, JR)

0.96

19.6

82

17

K.J. Hill (Ohio State, SR)

0.49

13.9

63

18

Bryan Edwards (South Carolina, SR)

0.90

14.0

65

19

Denzel Mims (Baylor, SR)

1.10

15.2

66

20

Collin Johnson (Texas, SR)

0.95

16.0

76

21

Michael Pittman Jr. (USC, SR)

0.95

15.3

76

22

Tamorrion Terry (Florida State, SO)

0.88

13.1

62

 

Tyler Johnson had the highest team share of receiving yards (43%) and the second-highest team share of receptions (23%) in 2018 among returning FBS players. But the best part of his game last year was in the red zone, where he scored a nation-leading 10 touchdowns. A crafty route runner, Johnson can win in both the short and intermediate parts of the field. Johnson will be one of the most productive Power 5 players once again.

Kalija Lipscomb had the fourth-highest team share of receptions (21%) in 2018 among returning FBS players. Primarily used as an underneath-and-intermediate receiver, Lipscomb caught 71% of his 124 targets last year. However, Lipscomb is more than a check-down receiver because he can win in the red zone. Last year, Lipscomb scored on six of his seven red zone receptions.

Primary slot receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown caught 70% of his 86 targets, leading him to one of the most efficient freshman seasons of 2018. A stud in terms of yards per route run, St. Brown should have no problems becoming the Trojans best offensive weapon in 2019, especially with a modified Air Raid system spreading out opposing defenses. He’s a very balanced and agile athlete.

Slot receiver Jaylen Waddle was Pro Football Focus’ second-highest graded receiver among returning FBS receivers with at least 50 targets last year. He was graded highly because he caught 75% of his targets and because he averaged 8.0 yards after the catch. Waddle’s burst looks video enhanced on replays and he's a threat to score every play, whether that’s on a crossing route or on a go.

Devonta Smith led the country in quarterback rating when targeted, caught 72% of his targets, and only dropped one target in 2018. With Jeudy, Ruggs, Waddle, and other targets to feed, Smith will be a lot more efficient than productive.

Slot receiver KJ Hamler has the juice, but he’ll need to clean up his game to live up to this ranking. But I believe in him. Hamler was second on this top 50 ranking in yards after the catch per reception (8.6) and he should morph into one of the top slot receivers in the country. If he has a step on a defender, it’s a touchdown.

Slot receiver J.D. Spielman caught 71% of his targets and he’s certainly athletic enough to avoid tackles and create after the catch, which led to a nice finish in PFF’s yards per route run. Now the clear-cut top target, Spielman should be one of the most productive receivers in the country, especially with Heisman long-shot Adrian Martinez throwing passes for the Huskers. Look for Nebraska to get Spielman the ball at the line of scrimmage for easy yards.

Slot receiver K.J. Hill caught 71% of his targets last year, leading him to a high-end finish in yards per route run. While not as extreme as Parris Campbell, Hill was rarely targeted downfield, but that’s okay since he’s really elusive underneath.

Bryan Edwards has enough size, speed, and route running skills to play like a Tier 1 receiver at times (especially when he’s running deep routes), but he’s not as polished and probably won’t test as well as the others listed above him. However, at 6-foot-3 and 220 pounds, he’ll continue to physically dominate defenders in college.

Denzel Mims has a track and basketball background, and it’s easy to see that on tape. He works well in space and can jump with the best of them, making Mims a threat to beat defenders downfield and over the middle. However, Mims is not as consistent as the receivers ranked ahead of him, especially in traffic. I believe Mims can actually improve on that given his size (6’3/205) and athletic ability, but I couldn't justify ranking him higher. If Mims plays to potential, he can be a Day 2 pick next year.

Collin Johnson has size (6’6/220) and reliable hands, making him one of the better deep threats in the Power 5. His size, however, prevents him from making sudden movements, so he’s best utilized in jump ball situations or when he’s given time to build up some speed. With Lil’Jordan Humphrey in the NFL, Johnson will become the clear-cut No. 1 target for Sam Ehlinger, who is my No. 3 college quarterback entering the season. They should connect for double-digit touchdowns in 2019.

Michael Pittman Jr. only had one drop in 2018 despite only catching 53% of his 77 targets. Part of that falls on J.T. Daniels -- historical data suggests Daniels will be better in 2019 -- but it’s just the nature of how Pittman is used at USC. 37% of Pittman’s targets last year came on passes traveling more than 20 yards downfield, so his completion percentage will remain low. But don’t get that confused with skills. On Pittman’s 29 deep targets, he averaged 12.7 yards.

Tamorrion Terry had the second highest yards per reception (21.3) among returning FBS receivers, and he’ll likely remain towards the top of the leaderboard with how Florida State used him last year. Terry finished with the second-highest percentage of targets that traveled further than 20 yards downfield, only trailing USC’s Michael Pittman among my top 50 receivers.

 

Continue to Tiers 3 and 4.

Tier 3

Tier 3 receivers can be just about anyone as long as they have either shown production or have shown potential.

Rank

Tier 3 Receivers

YTOP

FPPG

ReYD PG

23

Damonte Coxie (Memphis, JR)

1.14

16.5

84

24

James Proche (SMU, SR)

1.38

23.7

100

25

Antonio Gandy-Golden (Liberty, SR)

1.11

21.3

94

26

Adrian Hardy (Louisiana Tech, JR)

1.25

17.3

88

27

Rico Bussey Jr. (North Texas, SR)

1.05

20.1

85

28

Marquez Stevenson (Houston, JR)

1.01

17.8

78

29

Seth Williams (Auburn, SO)

0.60

10.9

53

30

Elijah Moore (Mississippi, SO)

0.46

8.0

36

31

Justin Jefferson (LSU, SR)

0.92

13.7

67

32

Tyler Vaughns (USC, JR)

1.02

13.5

56

33

Donovan Peoples-Jones (Michigan, JR)

0.68

12.0

47

34

Lynn Bowden Jr. (Kentucky, JR)

0.90

13.2

57

35

Anthony Schwartz (Auburn, SO)

0.40

5.8

30

36

Jeremiah Holloman (Georgia, JR)

0.45

8.7

38

37

Aaron Fuller (Washington, SR)

0.90

12.1

62

 

Damonte Coxie is the definition of a chain mover. In fact, Coxie had 52 first downs last year, and that’s largely due to his elusiveness. Coxie figures to remain close to the top of the avoided tackles leaderboard once again in 2019.

Slot receiver James Proche was near the top of the first down leaderboards and finished with the highest market share of total yards among returning FBS receivers, narrowly beating Jalen Reagor for the top spot. Proche did so by being a target hog (143 targets) and by converting 65% of them into receptions. Proche also had the sixth-highest team share of receptions (20%) in 2018 among returning FBS players. Maybe there are more purely talented receivers in the Group of 5, but there won’t be many with his total production, especially if he continues to dominate in the red zone; he tied for the second-most red zone touchdowns (8) in 2018 among returning FBS receivers.

Antonio Gandy-Golden was in the 50 first down club last year despite playing in just 11 games, and a large reason for that was Liberty’s willingness to just chuck balls downfield to him. Among returning FBS receivers, only Tylan Wallace had more targets on passes of 20 or more yards than Gandy-Golden. He also showed dominance in the red zone by scoring touchdowns on six of his eight red zone receptions.

Adrian Hardy may be rougher around than edges than others on this list -- he has a high drop rate for example -- but Hardy is a nice deep threat. A whopping 54 of his 75 receptions went for first downs and that wasn’t because of a ton of yards after the catch. Hardy gets beyond the chains and then just makes things happen. He’ll be among the leaders in yards among Group of 5 receivers.

Rico Bussey Jr. is one of the best deep threats in the country, and he should remain towards the top of the leaderboard in yards on targets of 20 or more yards with Mason Fine throwing him passes. But Bussey can also win when the field is shrunk. In the red zone last year, Bussey scored six touchdowns.

According to Pro Football Focus, slot receiver Marquez Stevenson averaged the most yards per route run from the slot last year among FBS receivers who played at least 300 snaps from the slot. My No. 5 college quarterback D’Eriq King and Stevenson should connect for 1,000 yards in 2019.

Versatile receiver Seth Williams had a productive freshman season despite playing in the SEC in a questionable offense. Williams showed plus athleticism at 6-foot-3 and 210 pounds, especially on deep routes. Still young and learning the position, Williams has tons of potential to climb even higher.

Slot receiver Elijah Moore caught 74% of his targets last year, but he’ll need to expand his route tree to climb into Tier 2. As a freshman, Moore basically never ran a route deeper than 20 yards and the coaching staff probably plans to keep it that way and allow Moore to pile up yards after the catch. Look for Moore to get involved as a ball carrier, too.

Justin Jefferson was a stud on first downs last year. In fact, 59% of his yards and half of his touchdowns came on them. I’m not completely sure what to make of that, but I think this is just a product of his offense, one that is expected to change this season. If LSU modernizes with Joe Burrow now comfortable as the starter, Jefferson stands to benefit. If Jefferson shows more athleticism, he could be a riser.

Tyler Vaughns won’t have the production of others on the list with the Trojans depth at receiver, but he’s flashed nice athletic ability -- he can really get up -- and was decently productive as a freshman (807 yards in 2017). Expect Vaughns to do most of his damage within 15 yards of the line of scrimmage.

Donovan Peoples-Jones is an interesting player. Sometimes he’ll line up in the slot, but he also finished towards the top of the list in percentage of targets downfield. Perhaps there’s an identity issue. Perhaps Peoples-Jones is just pretty good at everything but hasn’t developed an elite go-to move. With Michigan’s offense expected to incorporate more spread concepts, I’m expecting Peoples-Jones to have a much-improved season, but he’s very much a projection.

Slot receiver Lynn Bowden Jr. had the highest team share of receptions (23%) in 2018 among returning FBS players. Bowden caught 78% of his 108 targets last year, also leading returning FBS receivers with at least 85 targets.

Anthony Schwartz is a legit Olympic-level sprinter. In high school, Schwartz recorded a 4.34 forty and he’ll be one of the scariest receivers to cover in 2019. If Schwartz shows more nuance, he could soar up these rankings. In addition to his deep routes, look for Schwartz to be active near the line of scrimmage.

Jeremiah Holloman is a size (6’2/200) and speed (4.48 forty) receiver with the potential to climb up 20 spots if he comes out of the offseason with more polish as a route runner. My No. 4 quarterback Jake Fromm will put Holloman in ideal spots to rack up yards after the catch in 2019.

Caught between an outside and slot receiver, Aaron Fuller has shown the athleticism to work inside, but he’s been able to win on deep patterns when he’s not being covered by a physical corner. 

 

Tier 4

Tier 4 receivers are potential Power 5 WR1s and hyper-efficient Group of 5 receivers. These players have a chance to work their way into the draft.

Rank

Tier 4 Receivers

YTOP

FPPG

ReYD PG

38

Ja'Marr Chase (LSU, SO)

0.33

7.2

31

39

Chase Claypool (Notre Dame, SR)

0.67

10.6

49

40

Nico Collins (Michigan, JR)

0.70

10.6

49

41

Rashod Bateman (Minnesota, SO)

0.81

12.1

54

42

Theo Howard (UCLA, SR)

0.70

11.9

56

43

Corey Sutton (App State, JR)

0.90

13.9

59

44

Darnell Mooney (Tulane, SR)

1.10

15.0

76

45

T.J. Vasher (Texas Tech, JR)

0.56

15.0

62

46

Shi Smith (South Carolina, JR)

0.76

12.4

61

47

Damon Hazelton (Virginia Tech, JR)

0.85

13.8

62

48

Isaiah Zuber (Kansas State, SR)

0.78

12.0

52

49

Dezmon Patmon (Wash State, SR)

0.85

13.3

63

50

*Jayden Reed (Michigan State, SO)

0.83

15.3

66

Quick notes: Ja’Marr Chase was an intriguing recruit heading into freshman season, and he had flashes of his upside in 2018. Chase has adequate size (6’1/205) and I expect him to threaten defenses at all depths of the field. … Chase Claypool has size (6’4/227) and blocks well, but we’ll have to see how he does as the top dog in 2019. Claypool has flashed the ability to be a WR1, but he wasn’t good on deep routes last year and probably doesn’t have the high-end athletic ability to be a stud underneath. With that said, Claypool should be one of the better chain movers in college football. … Nico Collins was one of three FBS receivers with at least 50 targets who didn’t drop a single target in 2018 (Theo Howard and Devin Duvernay). That’s pretty impressive considering nearly a third of Collins’ targets came on passes thrown deep. … Theo Howard led in Pro Football Focus’ “Hands Grade” last year after not dropping a single one of his catchable targets. … … Corey Sutton was near the top of the list in yards per route run among returning FBS receivers, largely because of his deep threat ability. Appalachian State sent Sutton further than 20 yards downfield often because he was easily their best option to spread the opposing defenses out. … Slot receiver Darnell Mooney was elite in YPRR and had the fourth highest yards per receptions (20.7) among returning FBS receivers, largely in part to his elite YAC ability (8.3). … Isaiah Zuber transferred from Kansas State to Mississippi State this offseason, but he's eligible to play. ... Slot receiver Jayden Reed was near the top of the leaderboard in avoided tackles, among other categories, but he'll need an NCAA waiver to be granted eligibility in 2019 after transferring from Western Michigan to Michigan State.

 

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