Tokyo 2021: Top-12 U.S. Olympians of all-time by medal count

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The United States’ Olympians are some of the most prolific medal winners in the history of the Games, and now you can see how much the best have won in our augmented reality experience.

Check out the experience above to compare the medal count from the winningest U.S. Olympians of all time – from Allyson Felix to Apolo Anton Ohno to Michael Phelps. Using your mobile device, you can place the athletes in your room and observe the medal count in physical space through your camera. The height of the athletes and the size of the Olympic medals are to scale.

1. Michael Phelps – Swimming

Phelps leads the pack with 28 total medals since his Olympic debut in 2000 – 10 more than the next winningest Olympic athlete in the world and 16 more than any other U.S. Olympian. Phelps dominated the sport for 16 years and finished his career with 23 gold, three silver and two bronze medals.

T-2. Jenny Thompson – Swimming

Thompson Is the winningest female Olympic swimmer in world history. During her Olympic career from 1992-2004, she won eight gold, three silver and one bronze medal.

T-2. Dara Torres – Swimming

Torres tallied four gold, four silver and four bronze medals during her unusually long Olympic career spanning from 1984-2008.

T-2. Natalie Coughlin – Swimming

Coughlin started swimming at the age of 6 and has become a highly decorated U.S. Olympic swimmer. She competed in Athens (2004), Beijing (2008) and London (2012), taking home three gold, four silver and five bronze medals.

3. Carl Osburn – Shooting

Osborn is the oldest athlete on this list, competing in 1912, 1920 and 1924. Osburn was a decorated military officer as well as a decorated Olympic shooter and he earned five gold, four silver and two bronze medals.

4. Allyson Felix – Track

Felix is a four-time Olympic track and field athlete and competed in the Athens 2004, Beijing 2008, London 2012 and Rio 2016 Games. She holds six gold medals and three silver medals, and will be competing in her fifth Olympics in Tokyo this summer.

T-5. Allison Schmitt – Swimming

Schmitt has competed in three Olympics for Team USA. She competed in Beijing (2008), London (2012), and Rio (2016), taking home four gold, two silver and two bronze medals.

T-5. Shirly Babashoff – Swimming

Babashoff competed in the Munich 1972 and the Montreal 1976 Games. She earned two gold and six silver medals. She is seen as one of the greatest freestyle swimmers, setting 11 world records and 37 U.S. records.

T-5. Apolo Anton Ohno – Speedskating

Ohno holds the record for most medals by a U.S. Winter Olympian with two gold, two silver and four bronze medals in short track speedskating. He began his Olympic career in the Salt Lake City 2002 Games and ended with the Vancouver 2010 Games.

T-6. Shannon Miller – Gymnastics

Miller is the only gymnast to make this list with a total of seven medals to her name. She was a part of the 1996 U.S. team dubbed the “Magnificent Seven” that defeated Russia for the gold for the first time in Olympic history.

T-6. Dana Vollmer – Swimming

Vollmer competed in 2004, 2012 and 2016. She totaled seven medals, with five gold, one silver and one bronze medal.

T-6. Amanda Beard

Beard won two Olympic silver medals in the individual breaststroke events and one relay gold medal while still in high school. She ended her Olympic career with a total of seven medals, two gold, four silver and one bronze after competing in the 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008 Games.

All medal counts via TeamUSA.com and Olympics.com

The 3D experience can be viewed on both desktop and mobile.

For desktop:

  • Click on “View in 3D” above

  • Use your mouse to zoom and rotate the object

For mobile (optimal experience):

  • Click on “View in 3D” above

  • Tap on the camera icon in the upper right-hand corner of the browser

  • Press “allow” (this prompt should come up multiple times)

  • Place the object in your space, use your fingers to resize and rotate in augmented reality

  • To take a photo of what you’re seeing, tap on the screen and a camera icon will appear