Two more athletes including US gymnast test positive for Covid-19 at Olympics

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tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - DAVID GANNON /AFP
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - DAVID GANNON /AFP

Two more athletes have tested positive for Covid-19 after arriving in Tokyo.

An unnamed American female alternate gymnast has tested positive, the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee says. The athlete is reported to be in her teens and is being kept in isolation in by the city of Inzai, Chiba Prefecture, where she was training ahead of the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Olympics on Friday.

This follows reports that Czech beach volleyball player Ondrej Perusic has also tested positive, just seven days before his country's opening match, both AP and Reuters are reporting.

Perusic, who is vaccinated, and his playing partner were due to the begin their Olympic program on July 26 against opponents from Latvia.

Czech team leader Martin Doktor said in a statement they would ask to postpone the game until the infected player is cleared to play.

The reports of positive Covid cases today come after two South African football players tested positive on their arrival at the Olympic village on Sunday.

01:30 PM

Spanish runner apologises over surname remarks

Reuters.

Former Spanish runner Isaac Viciosa has publicly apologised to athlete Mohamed Katir after saying he would have preferred an athlete "with Spanish surnames" to have taken his 3,000 metre national record.

Katir, who was born in Morocco but grew up in Spain and represents the country internationally, broke Viciosa's 23-year-old record by almost two seconds after clocking a time of 7:27.64 at Gateshead's Diamond League meeting last Tuesday.

Katir also holds the Spanish records for 1500m and 5000m, and will compete for Spain in the latter at the Tokyo Olympics which start this week.

Viciosa told magazine Soy Corredor that he "would have preferred that an athlete with Spanish surnames broke the record," leading to a widespread backlash.

Katir responded on Instagram by defending his origins, while the President of Spain's Superior Sports Council, Jose Manuel Franco, also criticised Viciosa on Twitter.

"I would like to let it be known that, after an interview in which the journalist was loyal to the answers I gave, that the first thing I did was send a message to Mo Katir apologising for my words and anything that might have hurt him," Viciosa wrote in a public letter of apology.

"I have also apologised for distracting him in his preparations for the Tokyo Olympics."

01:14 PM

Tokyo Olympics 2021 medal table: How does it work, which country usually wins and what are Team GB's hopes?

Are the United States likely to prove as dominant as ever and can Team GB possibly improve on their second place from Rio 2016?

The medal table is the focal point for many countries during the Olympics, with many using it to judge how their teams have performed over the 16 day games.

The USA tops the all-time Summer Olympics table, and have finished top of the medals table on numerous occasions at previous games.

Russia and China have also challenged for the top spot, although athletes will not be able to compete for Russia at Tokyo following the doping scandal ban in 2019. Instead, Russian athletes will compete under the Russian Olympic Committee, meaning that the flag nor the national anthem will be played during the games.

Telegraph Sport has broken it all down here.

12:58 PM

Nobel Peace Prize winner says Olympics deserves the award

AP.

The Olympic movement deserves to win the Nobel Peace Prize, former award winner Muhammad Yunus said today.

Yunus, a Bangladeshi banker who was awarded his Nobel in 2006 for pioneering micro-credit loans to impoverished people, has worked with the International Olympic Committee on a business program for athletes.

"I think it has a very good case to establish itself as a candidate," Yunus said in an online conference call ahead of receiving an Olympic award at the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Games on Friday.

Yunus cited North and South Korean athletes marching under one flag at the opening ceremony of the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Games as an example of the Olympics using sports to create peace.

"If that is not peace-making I don't know what it is," Yunus said. "Definitely the Olympics has a tremendous reason to believe it can win the peace prize one day."

His comments came seven months before the 2022 Beijing Winter Games, which activists have branded the "Genocide Games" because of China's treatment of Muslim minority Uyghur people in the western Xinjiang region.

Asked if sports should be rewarding or engaging with China, Yunus referred to the ancient tradition of the Olympic truce revived by the modern Olympic Games.

"The whole spirit of the Olympics is to get together," he said of the truce in ancient Greece that allowed free passage of athletes and spectators from rival city-states to attend the event and return home. "After the Olympics truce is over, go back if you want to whatever you want to do, where you are coming from."

On Friday, Yunus will receive the IOC's Olympic Laurel award, which recognizes people for their work in education, development and peace in sport.

12:37 PM

Six Team GB track and field athletes isolating as Covid hits Tokyo Olympics

On Sunday it was confirmed that two competitors from South Africa had tested positive for coronavirus in the athletes' village, our Athletics Correspondent Ben Bloom reports from Tokyo.

Team GB’s Olympic plans have been thrown into disarray by news that six track and field athletes, two athletics staff members and two headquarters staff members have been forced to isolate in Japan after they were identified as close contacts of positive Covid cases.

All are now shut inside their rooms at Team GB’s preparation camp hotel in Yokohama or the Olympic Village, with the athletes unable to train less than a week from the start of the Tokyo Games.

The eight-strong athletics contingent were identified as close contacts after someone unconnected to Team GB on their flight to Japan on Thursday was found to have Covid. The British group all tested negative on arrival and have continued to do so every day since, but they remain in isolation as per Tokyo Games guidelines.

The identity of those affected has not been revealed due to medical confidentiality, but it is understood that world champions Dina Asher-Smith and Katarina Johnson-Thompson, and medal hopefuls Laura Muir and Jemma Reekie have not yet flown into Japan.

You can read Ben's report in full here.

12:18 PM

Japanese composer axed from Olympics opening ceremony after boasts about abusing disabled classmates revealed

A Japanese musician who boasted about abusing mentally-ill classmates when at school has quit his role as part of the creative team for the Tokyo Olympics opening ceremony after outcry at his appointment.

Keigo Oyamada, better known by his stage name Cornelius, was last week named as one of the music composers for the opening ceremony after a career spanning more than 25 years.

That announcement saw two interviews he gave to Japanese music magazines in 1994 and 1995 resurface, in which he described inflicting horrific abuse on his peers when at school.

He described locking a disabled classmate in a box, taping a cardboard box around his head and pouring chalk inside, wrapping him in a mattress and kicking him, making him eat his own faeces, and forcing him to masturbate in front of other students.

You can read Ben Bloom's report in full here.

11:57 AM

WHO's head likely to visit Japan to discuss Olympics, Covid

Reuters.

The head of the World Health Organisation (WHO) is likely to visit Japan to discuss the Olympics and the anti-coronavirus measures that the authorities have put in place, Kyodo news agency reported on Monday, citing a government source.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus plans to meet Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga during his visist, according to Kyodo.

The Tokyo Olympics kick off on Friday, July 23.

11:37 AM

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games schedule: dates, times and key events to watch out for

Telegraph Sport has produced a comprehensive guide to the stand-out Olympic events, concentrating primarily on events which could yield medals for Team GB.

You can read it in detail here.

11:14 AM

Team GB's Tokyo 2021 kit: how the heat-resistant look compares to other countries

It was accused of being “too blue” after Stella McCartney was brought in to design it. But there will be no mistaking the red on the British Olympic and Paralympic kit for Tokyo 2020.

A bold red stripe within a deconstructed Union flag is the most prominent feature of the Adidas-designed clothing that will be worn by Team GB and ParalympicsGB athletes at the postponed Games.

McCartney’s all-blue Union flag design from London 2012 caused a stir – although the colour was less prominent on her kit four years later – but it is red that stands out on this year’s offering from the manufacturer’s own in-house team.

The kit has also been emblazoned with Japanese typography in a nod to the host country and features what Adidas calls HEAT.RDY technology, which the company says will keep athletes cool whilst competing in what may be “the hottest Games on record”.

Ben Rumsby and the Telegraph Fashion team run the rule here.

10:58 AM

Irish gymnast leaps on cardboard beds at Athletes Village to bust 'anti-sex' myth

Reuters.

Irish gymnast Rhys McClenaghan has debunked the idea that the cardboard-framed beds for athletes in the Tokyo Olympic Village were not strong enough to withstand vigorous activity and were therefore "anti-sex" - by recording himself leaping up and down on the one in his room.

Organisers said athletes competing in the Games would sleep on bed frames made from recyclable cardboard and mattresses made of polyethylene materials that would be reused to make plastic products after the Games.

Manufacturer Airweave said the beds could support around 200 kilograms but some media reports claimed they were made out of cardboard to collapse under the weight of more than one person to promote social distancing amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

American distance runner Paul Chelimo wrote on Twitter on Saturday that the decision to have cardboard beds was "aimed at avoiding intimacy among athletes."

McClenaghan took to Twitter to debunk the idea.

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"The beds are meant to be 'anti-sex' ... They're made out of cardboard, yes, and apparently they're meant to break at any sudden movements... It's fake! Fake news," he said while jumping on his bed in a video clip.

The official Olympics Twitter account thanked McClenaghan in a tweet on Monday for clearing up the matter and added: "The sustainable cardboard beds are sturdy."

Organisers plan to give away about 150,000 condoms at the Games, but are telling athletes to take them home rather than use them in the village where social distancing rules and coronavirus measures are top priority.

Olympics officials on Sunday reported the first COVID-19 case among competitors in the village where most of the 11,000 athletes are expected stay during the July 23-Aug. 8 Games.

10:42 AM

Controversial composer Keigo Oyamada steps down from role in Opening Ceremony

Composer Keigo Oyamada, who has been accused of abusing disabled classmates and forced them to perform sex acts , has stepped down from his role in the opening ceremony, just two days after being given public backing by the chief executive of Tokyo 2020, Nippon Television report.

Better known by his stage name Cornelius, he has been one of Japan’s most successful singer-songwriters over a career spanning more than 25 years and was this week named as one of the music composers for the Olympics opening ceremony.

That announcement saw two interviews he gave to Japanese music magazines in 1994 and 1995 resurface, in which he described inflicting horrific abuse on his peers when at school.

He describes locking a disabled classmate in a box, taping a cardboard box around his head and pouring chalk inside, wrapping him in a mattress and kicking him, making him eat his own faeces, and forcing him to masturbate in front of other students.

You can read Ben Bloom's report on the controversial composer here.

10:25 AM

Princess Anne sends message of support to Team GB ahead of Tokyo Olympics

The Princess Royal says this year's Games will be 'different, but no less important', as she recalled her experience of competing in 1976, reports Victoria Ward.

The Princess Royal has told British Olympians that this year’s Games will be "different, but no less important", as she recalled the "single-minded focus" needed to compete.

Princess Anne, 70, was the first member of the Royal Family to compete in the Olympics when she rode the Queen's horse, Goodwill, in the equestrian three-day event in Montreal in 1976.

As president of the British Olympic Association, she recorded a good luck message for Team GB ahead of Tokyo 2020, which starts on Friday, wishing them every success.

"Although I am sad not to be there in person, I and the whole nation will be cheering for you and proudly supporting you from home," she said.

You can read more of the Royal message of motivation here.

10:08 AM

South Korean President Moon Jae-in has decided not to visit Japan for Olympics

AP.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in has decided not to visit Japan for the Tokyo Summer Olympics, citing a failure to set up a summit with Japan's prime minister that would produce meaningful results in improving relations.

Moon's office said Monday that officials from Seoul and Tokyo held talks over longstanding disputes about wartime history and a "future-oriented" development of their relations, but did not find enough common ground to support a summit between their leaders.

The countries had been discussing the possibility of Moon visiting Tokyo to participate in the Olympics' opening ceremony and having talks with Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga about repairing bilateral ties that have sunk to postwar lows in recent years with disputes over history, trade and military cooperation.

"The Tokyo Olympics are a festival of peace for people around the world, and we hope that Japan holds the Olympics safely and successfully," Moon's office said in a statement. "We also hope our athletes, despite the difficult conditions, fully display the skills they have developed in competition and return home healthy."

Relations between Seoul and Tokyo have been strained since South Korea's Supreme Court in 2018 ordered some Japanese companies to compensate Korean forced laborers for their ordeals during Japan's 1910-1945 colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula. The rulings led to further tensions over trade when Japan imposed export controls on chemicals vital to South Korea's semiconductor industry in 2019.

09:50 AM

Coco Gauff withdraws from Olympics after positive coronavirus test

AP.

U.S. tennis player Coco Gauff has tested positive for the coronavirus, forcing her to pull out of the Tokyo Olympics.

"I am so disappointed to share the news that I have tested positive for COVID and won't be able to play in the Olympic Games in Tokyo," Gauff tweeted on Sunday.

"It has always been a dream of mine to represent the USA at the Olympics, and I hope there will be many more chances for me to make this come true in the future."

The 17-year-old lost to Angelique Kerber 6-4, 6-4 on Centre Court in the fourth round at Wimbledon earlier this month. It was the second time she had lost at that stage after her breakthrough run at the All England Club in 2019..

Gauff is No. 25 in the WTA rankings.

"We were saddened to learn that Coco Gauff has tested positive for COVID-19 and will therefore be unable to participate in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games," the U.S. Tennis Association said in a statement.

"We wish her the best as she deals with this unfortunate situation and hope to see her back on the courts very soon. We know Coco will join all of us in rooting on the other Team USA members who will be traveling to Japan and competing in the coming days."

The Olympics start on Friday in Tokyo and run until Aug. 8.

09:34 AM

Athletes' village hit by first Covid case of Games

Tokyo Olympics organisers said on Saturday that a person has tested positive for Covid-19 at the athletes' village, the first case at a site where most competitors will be staying, raising new doubts over promises of a "safe and secure" Games.

The organisers confirmed that a visitor from abroad who is involved in organising the Games had tested positive during a routine test on Friday. The person's nationality was not revealed due to privacy concerns.

The 2020 Games, postponed for a year due to the global pandemic, is being held mostly without spectators and under tight quarantine rules.

Japan's public has been lukewarm about the Games amid a resurgence in new coronavirus infections and worries that an influx of visitors may create a super-spreader event, straining an already-stretched medical system. Only around 20% of the population is fully vaccinated.

Tokyo 2020 President Seiko Hashimoto acknowledged the public's concerns.

"I understand that there are still many worrying factors. Organisers must try to make sure that people will understand that these games are safe and secure," she told a news conference on Saturday.

Telegraph Sport have all the details here.

09:18 AM

Tokyo Olympic stadiums: every venue hosting the postponed 2020 Games

The delayed 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games will be staged at a total of 42 venues, 27 of which are in and around the Japanese capital.

Those 27 are split into the Heritage Zone and Tokyo Bay Zone with the other 15 outlying venues.

The Heritage Zone contains iconic arenas which were a part of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, and will be reused in various forms, while the Tokyo Bay Zone houses 16 venues, as well as the International Broadcast Centre and Main Press Centre. The Olympic village can be found at the intersection of the two zones.

With international fans banned and domestic fans banned in Tokyo and the three neighbouring prefectures of Saitama, Chiba and Kanagawa due to a new state of emergency, it means only a total of 26 sessions will take place in front of fans, and even then numbers will be capped at the venues.

Telegraph Sport has the details of all the sites here.

08:58 AM

From Simone Biles to Adam Peaty, the 20 best Olympic athletes in the world right now ahead of Tokyo 2020

This year's delayed Olympic Games in Tokyo will feature 11,000 athletes from all over the world competing across 33 sports, including the five new additions of surfing, skateboarding, karate, sport climbing and baseball/softball.

New names will be made and reputations enhanced for those already on the big stage. We take a look at 20 individuals already at the peak of their game and expected to challenge for top honours in Tokyo.

You can read our mini profiles of the 20 here.

08:41 AM

Russia withdraws Olympic rowing team

08:24 AM

Japanese composer who abused disabled classmates and forced them to perform sex acts remains involved in opening ceremony

Keigo Oyamada, better known by his stage name Cornelius, has been one of Japan’s most successful singer-songwriters. Our Athletics Correspondent Ben Bloom has all the distressing details.

Tokyo Olympics organisers insist they are happy for a famous Japanese musician to continue as a composer for next week’s opening ceremony despite interviews resurfacing where he described abusing mentally ill classmates and forcing them to carry out sex acts in front of other students.

Keigo Oyamada, better known by his stage name Cornelius, has been one of Japan’s most successful singer-songwriters over a career spanning more than 25 years and was this week named as one of the music composers for the Olympics opening ceremony.

That announcement saw two interviews he gave to Japanese music magazines in 1994 and 1995 resurface, in which he described inflicting horrific abuse on his peers when at school.

He describes locking a disabled classmate in a box, taping a cardboard box around his head and pouring chalk inside, wrapping him in a mattress and kicking him, making him eat his own faeces, and forcing him to masturbate in front of other students.

You can read Ben's report in full here.

08:08 AM

Team GB's next athletics stars? 11 names making Olympic debuts and hoping for big things at Tokyo 2021

While the Olympics represents a chance for established athletes to further etch their names into the history books, the Games equally provide a launchpad for others.

A total of 76 athletes will make up the British athletics team in Tokyo, by far the biggest of any sport Team GB are contesting.

But who are the lesser names that we should be keeping an eye out for as their pull on the Olympic rings for the first time in their career? Ben Bloom takes a look here....

07:50 AM

The topless Tongan returns for Tokyo 2020: Bare-chested flag bearer to compete again at the Olympics

He was the star of the opening ceremony at the 2016 Olympic Games, and again two years later as a winter Olympian in PyeongChang. And now Tonga's Pita Taufatofua is back for this third Olympics, and sure to catch the eye again.

Taufatofua shot to fame five years ago. Having qualified for the sport of taekwondo, he took a rather different approach to being named flag bearer for his native Tonga, going viral when he oiled himself up and appeared at the 2016 opening ceremony wearing nothing but a taʻovala (a Tongan mat which is wrapped around the waist) and a shell necklace.

tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - ARIS MESSINIS /AFP
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - ARIS MESSINIS /AFP

Some initially assumed he was sweating profusely but it became apparent that he had applied copious amounts of oil to his torso.

During the actual taekwondo tournament, Taufatofua was eliminated in his first bout but his fame lived on.

You can read more on his delightful back story from five years ago here.

07:31 AM

Bored Simone Biles turns agony aunt on social media

Reuters.

In Tokyo for the Olympics but unable to go anywhere except her hotel and practice sessions, defending Olympic all-around gymnastics champion Simone Biles sent out a call one recent afternoon: "Tell me a secret - I'm bored."

Her 4.4 million Instagram followers responded with everything from personal problems to how they skipped school, prompting the 24-year-old Biles to dish out life advice and reactions accompanied by candid selfies.

A message reading: "I have one of my closest friends muted on Instagram cause she posts the dumbest things," got an earnest Biles looking straight at the camera and agreeing, "Me too. Sometimes it's needed."

Others said they had lost their sense of smell, received a secret inheritance and were getting surprise presents for their mothers. One person even confided that they were pregnant - to which Biles responded with a big grin and "Congrats!"

tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - Kiichiro Sato /AP
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - Kiichiro Sato /AP

But some messages were more serious.

"I still haven't told my dad I'm gay even though everyone else in my family knows," wrote one person.

A pensive Biles responded: "Tell him, be free, be yourself. I support you," adding: "For anyone else struggling with telling family or friends, just know I will always welcome you with open arms on my page and platforms."

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Tokyo 2020 Olympics - postponed for a year - are being held under strict protocols, including daily virus tests for athletes, to prevent any further spread in a country where most people have yet to get a vaccine and still want the Games cancelled or postponed again.

Biles, who has won every all-around competition she has taken part in since 2013, won five medals in Rio de Janeiro in 2016, including all-around gold, and is predicted to improve on that in Tokyo.

07:14 AM

Helen Glover exclusive interview: 'Don't call me a supermum'

Pippa Field goes behind the scenes with double Olympic champion and mum-of-three Glover, the first British rower to compete at the Games after giving birth.

Helen Glover is sitting at the large table of her open plan waterfront family home. Only days earlier, the all-conquering double Olympic rowing champion had located her eldest son, Logan, relaxing under this same piece of furniture, gleefully tucking into a cake he had swiped from the sideboard.

Today the youngster, who turns three on Saturday, is free of sugary goods, but still a bundle of energy, clambering over the bench to be closer to his famous mum.

Through the vast floor to ceiling windows overlooking the Thames at the bottom of the garden, heavy clouds are forming. But inside the house, one that she shares with husband, TV explorer Steve Backshall, all is calm as Logan’s 18-month old twin siblings, Kit and Bo, finish off their midday nap.

In the final run-up to Tokyo – where she will partner Polly Swann in the women’s pair – Glover has extended an exclusive invitation to The Telegraph to see life behind the scenes of one of Britain’s greatest ever athletes in search of an unprecedented Olympic rowing medal as a mother.

You can read all about that behind the scenes access here.

07:00 AM

Czech volleyball player tests positive in Olympic Village

AFP.

Czech beach volleyball player Ondrej Perusic has tested positive for Covid-19 in the Tokyo Olympic Village, officials said, after two South African footballers and an analyst were found to be infected at the complex.

Perusic submitted "a positive sample during everyday testing in the Olympic Village on Sunday, July 18", Czech Olympic team head Martin Doktor said in a statement.

"He has absolutely no symptoms. We are dealing with all the details and... naturally the anti-epidemic measures within the team," he added.

On Saturday, the Czech Olympic Committee reported a staff member had tested positive for Covid-19 upon landing in Tokyo for the Games starting on Friday.

Perusic's case appears to be the fourth in the Olympic Village after the infections of two South African footballers and a video analyst were revealed on Sunday.

The Olympic Village, a complex of apartments and dining areas in Tokyo, will house 6,700 athletes and officials at its peak when the delayed 2020 Games finally get underway.

06:44 AM

Welcome to Tokyo, the 'best-ever prepared' Olympics host, and a city grappling with Covid contradictions

Tokyo 2020 president, Seiko Hashimoto, on Saturday admitted that 'the Games are not really fully embraced by the public', reports our Athletics Correspondent Ben Bloom, who's on the ground in Tokyo.

In the searing heat of the midday sun, the Tokyo pavements are throng with workers sheltering under umbrellas for protection. In a few hours, they will pack out every available back-street ramen joint, slurping noodles shoulder to shoulder in the tightest of spaces before the city-wide curfew kicks in at 8pm and everything shuts for the night.

Theirs is a city grappling with contradictions. A place officially under a ‘state of emergency’ where its masked population, weary of restrictions so deep into the pandemic, are allowed to go about their daily business largely as normal.

A city welcoming up to 100,000 foreigners from almost every country in the world at precisely the same time its own Covid cases reach a six-month high. A place where senior medical figures, grappling with vaccine shortages and a worryingly low vaccination rate, implore their government to put an end to the madness of prioritising sport over health.

Welcome to Tokyo: the “best-ever prepared” host in history, according to the head of the International Olympic Committee; or the unfortunate pawn in a game many believe should not be played. The choice is yours.

You can read Ben's report in full here.

06:29 AM

Today in Tokyo

tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - KIM KYUNG-HOON /REUTERS
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - KIM KYUNG-HOON /REUTERS
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - Kiichiro Sato /AP
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - Kiichiro Sato /AP
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - Mike Egerton /PA
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - Mike Egerton /PA
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - MATTHEW CHILDS /REUTERS
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - MATTHEW CHILDS /REUTERS
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - Kyodo News 
tokyo 2020 olympics coronavirus outbreak japan team gb isolation fans - Kyodo News

06:15 AM

Every Tokyo 2021 Olympic sport ranked, from gymnastics to water polo

An Olympics in Tokyo that promises more variety than ever before with five new sports (sport climbing, karate, surfing, skateboarding and softball/baseball) and a total of 34 new events, including nine new mixed gender events, across 33 sports in total.

The aim by the International Olympic Committee is to pick a programme that attracts a younger audience, but there is sure to be something on offer for everyone.

With that in mind, Alan Tyers gives his verdict on the sports that will be contested in Tokyo for this summer's Olympic Games, including breaking some of the larger sports down into individual events. You can read his breakdown in full here.

05:56 AM

Tokyo 2020 sponsor Toyota withdraws Games TV adverts due to lack of public support, local media reports

Reuters.

Tokyo 2020 Olympics sponsor Toyota will not run Games-related TV adverts because of lacklustre public support for the Olympics, with two-thirds of Japanese doubting a safe Games can be held during the Covid-19 pandemic, local media reported.

Chief Executive Officer of Toyota Motor Corp, Akio Toyoda, will not attend the opening ceremony, the Yomiuri newspaper reported on Monday.

Toyota did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Some 60 Japanese corporations who have paid more than $3 billion for sponsorship rights to the postponed 2020 Olympics now face a a dilemma of whether or not to tie their brands to an event that has so far failed to win strong public backing.

Two-thirds of people in Japan doubt the country can host a safe and secure Olympics amid a fresh wave of coronavirus infections, according to a survey published by the Asahi newspaper just four days before the opening ceremony in Tokyo.

In the poll, 68 per cent of respondents expressed doubt about the ability of Olympic organisers to control coronavirus infections, with 55 per cent saying they were opposed to the Games going ahead.

Three-quarters of the 1,444 people in the telephone survey said they agreed with a decision to ban spectators from events.

As Covid-19 cases rise in Tokyo, which is under a fourth state of emergency, public concern has grown that hosting an event with tens of thousands of overseas athletes, officials and journalists could accelerate infection rates in Japan's capital and introduce variants that are more infectious or deadlier.

International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach has said he hopes the Japanese public will warm to the Games once competition begins and as Japanese athletes begin winning medals. The Tokyo Olympics run July 23 through Aug. 8.

"We will continue to co-operate and work closely with organisers such as Tokyo Metropolitan Government, Tokyo 2020, and the IOC to ensure we have a safe and secure environment for the Games," government spokesperson, Chief Cabinet Secretary Katsunobu Kato said at a regular briefing.

Games officials on Sunday reported the first Covid-19 case among competitors in the athletes' village in Tokyo where 11,000 athletes are expected stay during the Games. Since July 2, Tokyo 2020 organisers have reported 58 positive cases among athletes, officials and journalists.

A Tokyo 2020 spokesperson said the village was a safe place to stay, adding the infection rate among athletes and other Games-related people visiting Japan was nearly 0.1 per cent.

On Sunday six British track and field athletes along with two staff members were forced to isolate after someone on their flight to Japan tested positive for Covid-19.