How Tarik Cohen is thriving as the Bears continue to put more on his plate

JJ STANKEVITZ
NBC Sports Chicago

Mitchell Trubisky shook his head and grinned when he fielded yet another question this week about the touchdown pass Tarik Cohen threw against the Baltimore Ravens.

"Dang, you guys can't get enough of this," Trubisky said. "I talked about it after the game. Dowell (Loggains) was saying it was the best pass of the game. I'm like, ‘All right, geez, let him play quarterback.

"… He threw a dime ball. I love how he was fading away on it and celebrating on the 50-yard line. Zach (Miller) made a great catch. So A-plus; really impressive spiral, especially with the gloves on. Can't count any of that out. Tarik's a special player and it was an awesome throw."

The point here is less about Cohen's throw and more about the Bears finding yet another way for the rookie running back to make an impact. So far this year, Cohen has rushed 50 times, caught 26 passes, returned 14 punts and now thrown that historic touchdown. He's been asked to block in pass protection more frequently, allowing him to be on the field more. And he's worked with wide receivers coach Zach Azzanni and Kendall Wright (who Cohen referred to as another receiver coach for him) to expand his route tree, leading him to be the most-targeted player (33 targets) on the Bears through six weeks. 

That may seem like a lot to put on the plate of a fourth-round draft pick from an FCS school, but it hasn't been too much for Cohen. 

"We need Tarik to be that guy for us - the best playmaker we have," Loggains said. "There's no secret there. And he's a guy who we'll continue to use, and people are aware of him. So how creative can we get with him? How many different things can we do with him? 

"Like, we're stretching him. Mentally, he's stretched to the max playing all these positions - motioning out to wide receiver, playing running back and doing more in the backfield with more carries. So we have to keep stretching him and keep using him in the offense."

Opposing defenses have keyed on Cohen since his explosive debut Week 1 against the Atlanta Falcons, scheming to muffle his playmaking ability. But he still managed to nearly have a walk-off 73-yard run against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Week 3, and then in Week 6, with defenses figuring they could crash down on him on sweep plays to the edge, he (literally) threw another wrinkle into how to gameplan against him. The next time the Bears run a toss sweep to Cohen, opposing safeties will have to think twice about bolting toward the line of scrimmage to stop him. 

Every time Cohen seems to hit a rookie wall, he and the Bears find a way to knock it down. The discussion a week ago about Cohen was that he was dancing too much and not cutting upfield quick enough; this week, it's all about his perfect quarterback rating. 

"Our coaches do a good job of continuing to put him in places so he can be successful," fellow running back Benny Cunningham said. "But ultimately I feel like he has such a genuine love of the game, I don't see that happening (hitting the wall). Since the day he's been here, from Day 1 to today, I've seen no drop-off in his desire to be successful and to help this offense."

The Bears have known this about Cohen's mentality since they scouted and drafted him back in the spring, and his potential only blossomed after getting him into Halas Hall in May - "Early on, we knew Tarik was going to be pretty special," coach John Fox said. But Cohen wouldn't be able to reach that potential without the ability to handle the responsibilities of all the different tasks the Bears have asked of him so far. 

Cohen's ability to do so many different things makes him an important player for this team, and his ability to do them with an exciting, playmaking flair has made him a fan favorite since training camp. So what's next for the 5-foot-6 rookie?

"I think we've got something - I'll punt the ball this week," Cohen joked. "Naw, I'm playin'. I can't put the ball for nothing, I don't think. It'll probably go like 20 yards."

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