Sue Bird meets with Denver Nuggets, talks potential front office role with team

Yahoo Sports
Talks between <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/wnba/players/500/" data-ylk="slk:Sue Bird">Sue Bird</a> and the NBA’s <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/nba/teams/den" data-ylk="slk:Denver Nuggets">Denver Nuggets</a> have reportedly been going on for months. (AP)
Talks between Sue Bird and the NBA’s Denver Nuggets have reportedly been going on for months. (AP)

Coach Sue Bird has a nice ring to it. Or maybe Sue Bird, general manager.

Either way, Bird would probably excel behind the scenes the way she does on the court.

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The three-time WNBA champion and four-time Olympian was spotted at the Denver Nuggets’ practice facility on Friday according to reporter Chris Dempsey.


Dempsey reported that that Bird also talked with the executive staff about potentially working with the team.

The Nuggets would not be able to hire Bird full time because she is still playing for the Seattle Storm and is expected to return for her 18th season.

Mile High Sports reported that Bird, if hired, would be an intern and would be “more involved with the front office and not as a coach.

The outlet also reported that the talks have been ongoing between Bird and the Nuggets for at least two months. 

The NBA respects Bird

If she does make the leap into the NBA, Bird likely won’t have any trouble with the players. Many respect her longevity, game and competitiveness.

They lost their minds during the WNBA playoffs.





Bird on her coaching future

Bird wasn’t always sure of her coaching future. In a 2015 interview, she gave a noncommittal “yes and no” answer when asked about her coaching aspirations.

She ultimately finished the interview by saying she wouldn’t rule out coaching men if she did decide to pursue it.

Influx of women into NBA

Bird wouldn’t be the first WNBA player to transition into a coaching or management role with an NBA team.

<a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/nba/teams/sas" data-ylk="slk:San Antonio Spurs">San Antonio Spurs</a> assistant coach Becky Hammon (L) talks to Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich on the court during a timeout in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers in San Antonio. (AP Photo)
San Antonio Spurs assistant coach Becky Hammon (L) talks to Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich on the court during a timeout in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers in San Antonio. (AP Photo)

In 2014, Becky Hammon became the first full-time female assistant coach of the four major franchises when she joined the San Antonio Spurs. She was promoted earlier this year among the Spurs’ coaches after James Borrego left to become the head coach of the Charlotte Hornets. 

Hammon also interviewed with the Milwaukee Bucks for the general manager position before they ultimately went with Jon Horst.

Since Hammon, more women have begun coaching in the NBA.

Nancy Lieberman was the first woman to coach a professional men’s basketball team in 2009 before she joined the Sacramento Kings as an assistant in 2015.

Most recently, Kristi Toliver joined the Washington Wizards as an assistant coach. Toliver, unlike Hammon and Lieberman, is still playing professional basketball. She’ll continue coaching with the Wizards until May when the WNBA season starts again. 

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