Studs and duds from Packers’ 25-22 win over Bengals in Week 5

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The Green Bay Packers improved to 4-1 after five games by out-lasting the Cincinnati Bengals in overtime on Sunday. Despite not having Jaire Alexander, David Bakhtiari, Za’Darius Smith and Elgton Jenkins, the Packers got more than enough from their healthy stars to survive a valiant effort from the Bengals at Paul Brown Stadium.

Here are all the studs and duds from the Packers’ win over the Bengals in Week 5:

Studs

Green Bay Packers wide receiver Davante Adams (17).

WR Davante Adams: An explanation here probably isn’t necessary after he caught 11 passes for 206 yards and a score. He finished with six explosive plays over 16 yards and five of at least 20 yards, including a 34-yard catch converting on third-and-long and a 59-yarder setting up a field goal. The Bengals tried to double him on his short touchdown but he was too explosive off the line and in the air on the quick fade. His double-move from the slot on the 59-yard catch was exquisite; just a simple hesitation move and he blew past the safety. Somehow, the Packers got him open on the second-to-last play of regulation, and his 20-yard catch set up what could have been the game-winner. Aaron Rodgers was under pressure and just missed him on what could have been the dagger touchdown late in the fourth quarter, too. He was open in the end zone. Opponents are doubling him consistently, but the Packers’ schematic counters and Adams’ route-running ability are often too much for even double coverage.

DL Kenny Clark: On the Bengals’ first possession, he stuffed the middle and shut down Joe Burrow’s sneak attempt on 3rd-and-1, forcing a punt. Later in the half, he combined with Rashan Gary to stuff Joe Mixon for a loss. His recognition and chase-down of a well-designed bootleg play on the opening drive of the second half helped create Adrian Amos’ interception. In the fourth quarter, Clark made two important plays. He stopped Samaje Perine for a 1-yard loss on 3rd-and-1, and he helped stop Perine short of the sticks with 26 seconds left, setting up Evan McPherson’s long field goal attempt. Game-changing production from the Packers’ nose tackle.

QB Aaron Rodgers: He labored through the first quarter but then caught fire after the Bengals went up 7-0. He completed 22 of his next 25 passes and the Packers scored on five of the next six possessions, including touchdown passes to A.J. Dillon and Davante Adams. He was under pressure a little more Sunday, but there was no stopping him from clean pockets. He completed 23 passes on 28 attempts for 304 yards when kept clean. His completion to Adams for 20 yards set up one missed field goal, and he completed passes to Marcedes Lewis and Randall Cobb gaining 35 yards to set up the game-winning field goal. His 27 completions and 344 passing yards were season-highs.

RB A.J. Dillon: He created three big plays: a 24-yard catch, a 12-yard touchdown catch and a 17-yard run. The 247-pounder can be such a weapon as a checkdown target in the passing game because he’s often too much for defensive backs to bring down in space, especially when he gets a full head of steam moving forward. He showed excellent hands on the touchdown catch. On the explosive run, he bounced off a tackler at the line and then burst through to the second level. His 12 touches created 79 total yards.

TE Marcedes Lewis: He made a nice catch moving to his left for 14 yards, and his 20-yard catch-and-run on a well-designed screen pass helped set up the game-winning field goal. The 37-year-old bounced off two tacklers on the second catch. As always, Lewis did admirable work as an inline blocker in both the run game and pass protection.

LB De’Vondre Campbell: A miscommunication between Joe Burrow and his receiver created the interception in overtime, but credit Campbell for putting himself into position to make the play. He has three takeaways (two interceptions, one fumble recovery) in five games. On one two-play sequence in the fourth quarter, Campbell covered up the tight end and made the tackle after a short gain on first down, and then blew up Samaje Perine after a 1-yard gain on second down. He also stuffed Joe Mixon for a 2-yard loss in overtime.

CB Kevin King: His return after missing two games with a concussion was strong. He gave up three catches for just 17 yards, although one came underneath his coverage on 3rd-and-6 in the second half. He wrestled down both Tee Higgins and Tyler Boyd in the open field after short gains and didn’t miss a tackle. The fact Joe Burrow attempted 38 passes but only targeted King three times says something about the consistency of his coverage.

DL Dean Lowry: Sunday was the most disruptive game from Lowry in a long time. He had four pressures, including a quarterback hit, and batted down two passes. Not bad for a down lineman on 26 pass-rushing snaps. The Bengals still moved him around in the run game, but the Packers can handle some give against the run if Lowry is going to affect the game with his power and length as a rusher.

RB Aaron Jones: While 57 of his 103 rushing yards came on one carry, the long run was an elite play during a crucial part of the game. He sidestepped a tackle attempt at the line of scrimmage, beat another tackler in the open field and then was off to the races, putting the Packers into position to win the game in regulation. Overall, he had three runs over 10 yards. The run blocking hasn’t been great for Jones but he’s one of the best at creating something out of nothing. He forced at least a half-dozen missed tackles.

Duds

Katie Stratman-USA TODAY Sports

K Mason Crosby: He gets credit for the game-winner, but he also deserves a lot of blame for the way the game unfolded. He missed four kicks, including an extra point and the three potential game-winners. He couldn’t convert kicks from 36 yards out, 51 yards out and 40 yards with the game on the line. The 51-yard kick at the end of regulation was difficult, but the other two should always be made. Given the points left on the table by the kicker, the Packers were exceedingly lucky to escape Cincinnati with a win.

S Darnell Savage: He had to cover forever on Ja’Marr Chase’s 70-yard touchdown right before the half, but missing the knockdown or interception changed the game and kept the Bengals in it. That’s a play the speedy safety has to make. His ball skills – more specifically, his ball-tracking skills – have sometimes failed him on deep throws in his young NFL career.

P Corey Bojorquez: His two punts – both coming in the first half – averaged 33.5 yards, with a long punt of just 36 yards. The first was a field position decision – punting 36 yards to Cincinnati’s 8-yard line – but the second was a 31-yard shank that set up the Bengals at the 49-yard line. The punting blunder helped Cincinnati take an early 7-0 lead.

CB Isaac Yiadom: He gave up the game-tying two-point conversion to Tee Higgins, and he was very fortunate Higgins dropped an easy completion on the Bengals’ final drive in the fourth quarter. He also missed a tackle on special teams.

WR Allen Lazard: The Packers are finding it difficult to get him the ball. He ran routes on 37 pass plays (same number as Davante Adams) but only saw two targets, including one failed bubble screen. When he isn’t dominating as a blocker, as was the case Sunday, his value drops considerably. He completely whiffed on a block, creating a negative play for Aaron Jones.

S Henry Black: He missed two tackles on special teams, including one on the long kickoff return in the first half.

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