Steve Cohen calls Mets out: 'It’s hard to understand how professional hitters can be this unproductive'

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Steve Cohen talks to media at Nationals Park
Steve Cohen talks to media at Nationals Park

With the Mets' season in danger of slipping away, owner Steve Cohen was brutally honest while tweeting on Wednesday morning.

"It’s hard to understand how professional hitters can be this unproductive," Cohen tweeted. "The best teams have a more disciplined approach. The slugging and OPS numbers don’t lie."

The tweet from Cohen came in the wake of the Mets' fifth-straight loss (they're in the midst of a season-worst losing streak) that dropped them under .500 for the first time since early-May.

After being just a half game out of first place entering play last Friday, the Mets now trail the first-place Atlanta Braves by 4.5 games and the second-place Philadelphia Phillies by 2.0 games.

The Mets' lack of offense has been the biggest cause of their downfall as they have gone 12-20 in the second half.

While the club is still without Francisco Lindor and recently lost Javier Baez to injury, most of the Mets' regular position players have been healthy since June.

Over the last few weeks, both manager Luis Rojas and acting GM Zack Scott have been peppered about questions regarding the offensive futility.

And both Rojas and Scott have keyed in on the fact that, as a group, Mets hitters are having a difficult time hitting fastballs and have often been unprepared to attack in hitter's counts.

During the Mets' five-game skid, they have been close to inept with runners in scoring position, faring even worse than usual (and their usual this season has been quite bad).

As the Mets have lost nine of their last 12 games, they have averaged 3.5 runs per game, and the situational hitting has remained mostly dreadful. And it's the lack of situational hitting that is mostly to blame for New York's tailspin.