Stats prove Giants' Daniel Jones played best game of his career in Week 2 loss

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Daniel Jones rushes vs. Washington Football Team
Daniel Jones rushes vs. Washington Football Team

The main storylines following the Giants' loss to the Washington Football Team on Thursday weren't good. From Kenny Golladay yelling on the sideline to rookie Kadarius Toney calling the media "clowns," it was all-around not a good day to be a Giant.

Unless you were Daniel Jones because, despite the results of the game overall, it was a career best for No. 8.

And he has the stats to prove it.

From the start, Jones was locked in and a lot of that had to do with the run game -- something he defined through those 60 minutes. While Saquon Barkley did have a huge gain and looked a tad like his older self, Jones' feet were creating the most damage thanks to zone reads.

He rushed for 95 yards on just nine attempts, and it would've been over 100 if it wasn't for C.J. Board's questionable holding call that brought back a touchdown. Either way, that production was the most of any Giants quarterback in the Super Bowl era, which is very impressive. And after that success, Jones may be able to break that 100-yard mark and rewrite his own record.

But the passing game was also highly efficient for Jones. According to Pro Football Focus, Jones posted a 90.7 pass grade for the week, which is by far the highest mark of his career thus far. Overall, it was a 91.3 offense grade.

Stats also show that Jones was going downfield more often with an 11.0 average depth of target compared to 8.6 from Week 1. He might have even been better if Darius Slayton didn't drop a crucial touchdown catch in the end zone uncovered.

Another key to Jones' success was the ability to work through pressure, which was a poor stat against the Denver Broncos just four days prior. Jones completed nine of 13 attempts when PFF found him under pressure for a 86.0 pass grade.

And of those throws, none of them were "Turnover Worth Plays" either. In fact, Jones didn't have a turnover worth play, which PFF defines as "a pass that has a high percentage chance to be intercepted or a poor job of taking care of the ball and fumbling," all game.

Taking care of the football. Throwing to the open man. Making things happen with zone read runs. This is what Jones is capable of every time he suits up for Big Blue.

Now the key for him is to build off this and show his coaches, fans and the rest of the league that he can be consistent. The Giants don't need him to play near perfect like he did this time around, but limiting turnovers and driving with vigor down the field is the goal each week.

Jones needed a bounce-back performance after Week 1, and though the Giants fell in gut-wrenching fashion, he got just that against Washington.

New York will just hope that they can secure a win when Jones performs like this in the future.