Sport Letters: Dustin Johnson is a fine example of how top sportsmen should behave

Telegraph Sport
·3 min read
'Dustin Johnson's golf was amazing, but most impressive was his conduct and demeanor throughout the tournament' - Curtis Compton
'Dustin Johnson's golf was amazing, but most impressive was his conduct and demeanor throughout the tournament' - Curtis Compton

The EFL's decision to allow five substitutes will, no doubt, increase the pressure on the Premier League to follow suit. 

I am tired of the so called 'big clubs' with their large expensive squads shouting about allowing five substitutes in order to exploit their advantage, on the pretext that they want to protect their players from injury. 

The Premier League are right to resist in order to maintain as level a playing field as possible. If the 'big clubs' really want to protect players from injury, they should rotate their squad. That they have a large enough pool of top players to rotate is advantage enough. They need to stop whinging and get on with it.

Alan West, Huddersfield

Dustin Johnson's Masters victory was notable for several reasons. His golf was amazing, but most impressive was his conduct and demeanor throughout the tournament. He was a model of sportsmanship and courtesy, and a fine example of how top sportsmen should behave.

David Kidd, Petersfield 

If there is so much controversy about honouring sportsmen for just doing the day job perhaps there should be introduced a tariff. Two Olympic Golds, winning a Championship, scoring runs, automatically qualify for the Knighthood. All of which rather debases the Honour itself.

Michael J Buswell, Settle

Amid all the clamour for a knighthood for Lewis Hamilton I would ask readers to spare a thought for the late great John Surtees, the only man to be world champion on two and four wheels, a feat never likely to be repeated. Fans campaigned for years for a knighthood and it shamefully never happened.

Peter Fisher, Grayshott, Hants

What is the Health and Safety Executive doing about brain injuries in football? In any other employment the HSE would be leaning on bosses who knowingly exposed their employees to injury. Why is football different?

Terry Lloyd, Darley Abbey,  Derby

Ban heading - it’s called football for a reason.

Clive Tasker, Sandford on Thames 

Brian Moore (Telegraph Sport, Nov 16) questions the technical quality of the Amazon coverage of the Autumn Nations Series of rugby union internationals but there is surely a more fundamental question to be answered.

Why does the RFU think it is acceptable to limit the numbers watching to those who are able or willing to afford it or have the technical competence and equipment to view it ? They do not appear to be concerned that the number watching the fun will be the equivalent of one man and his dog.

There must be a real risk that interest in internationals will wane if hardly anybody gets to see them. Is money in their coffers their only criteria or is it a strange wish to appeal to online shoppers?

Ted Sperinck, Banbury

Blokes with mullets, Blokes with beards, Shoving each other Across a field. No flair, no guile, No joy, no grace; Not a flicker On Eddie's face. What profit victory? Who will pay To watch a beautiful game Played this way? 

Mark Ellison, Long Buckby,  Northants

Despite the views of Rob Bagchi (Final Whistle, Nov 18)  I believe that the use of analogies or sporting clichés is a brilliant way of explaining the progress with the vaccine production. To say otherwise is not cricket and remember - it is a game of two halves.

Hugh Milner, Worthing