The seven ages of Andy Murray... and why his impact will be felt for generations

Charlie Eccleshare
The Telegraph

From gangly, wild-haired teenager to one of Britain's greatest sporting heroes, Sir Andy Murray may soon be forced to hang up his racket but his impact will be felt for generations.

Not since the 1930s had Britain been able to celebrate a male tennis champion until Murray battled his way to the top of the sport in an era of unprecedented strength.

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The Scot can look back at a career that delivered the biggest prizes - three grand slam titles, two Olympic gold medals and one of the most remarkable seasons in Davis Cup history to earn Britain an unlikely triumph.

And while most top sportsmen would rather not stick their head above the parapet, once he became comfortable in the limelight, Murray swam against the tide, speaking out forcefully on issues like equality and doping.

He embraced his role as the figurehead of British tennis, actively supporting and encouraging those emerging in his wake like Kyle Edmund, Cameron Norrie and Johanna Konta. They could not have bigger shoes to fill.

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