Seahawks: Reviewing all 9 of their picks in the 2022 NFL draft

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·4 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

The 2022 NFL draft has come to an end.

Here is a review of all nine selections the Seattle Seahawks made over the last three days.

Pick No. 9: Mississippi State OT Charles Cross

(AP Photo/Sam Craft)

Measurables: 6-foot-5, 307 pounds, 34.5″ arms, 10.75″ hands

Projection: As a top-10 overall selection in the draft, Cross doesn’t need to worry about his snapcount even as a rookie. He should start Week 1 at left tackle for the Seahawks, taking the place of veteran Duane Brown – who is 36 years old and still a free agent. Cross is by far the most-qualified lineman on the roster to take over on the blindside.

Pick No. 40: Minnesota EDGE Boye Mafe

Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Measurables: 6-foot-4, 261 pounds, 32.625″ arms, 9.875″ hands

Projection: Mafe should see serious playing time right away, earning snaps on the high end of Seattle’s edge rotation behind free agent pickup Uchenna Nwosu and the rising Darrell Taylor. Much will depend on whether or not the team re-signs Carlos Dunlap, though.

Pick No. 41: Michigan State RB Kenneth Walker III

Raj Mehta-USA TODAY Sports

Measurables: 5-foot-9, 211 pounds, 30.375″ arms, 9.5″ hands

Projection: The Seahawks probably wouldn’t have drafted Walker if they were sure about Chris Carson being able to play again. That means Walker should most likely get No. 2 featured rusher reps behind Rashaad Penny. If Alex Collins isn’t re-signed, Walker’s role is secured.

Pick No. 72: Washington State OT Abraham Lucas

James Snook-USA TODAY Sports

Measurables: 6-foot-6, 315 pounds, 33.875″ arms, 10.5″ hands

Projection: Right tackle is another potential sore point after Brandon Shell was allowed to hit free agency. Taking Lucas gives Seattle another strong option at this spot, though. He will most likely have to beat out 2021’s undrafted rookie Jake Curhan to win the starting job, but we expect him to do so without too much trouble.

Pick No. 109: Cincinnati CB Coby Bryant

Stephen Lew-USA TODAY Sports

Measurables: 6-foot-1, 193 pounds, 30.625″ arms, 9.375″ hands

Projection: After the loss of D.J. Reed, the Seahawks had a need at boundary cornerback. Bryant was a four-year starter in college but he’ll likely be a backup as a rookie in the NFL. He’ll need to get past Sidney Jones and Artie Burns first to join the starting CB rotation.

Pick No 153: UTSA CB Tariq Woolen

(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Measurables: 6-foot-4, 205 pounds, 33.625″ arms, 9.125″ hands

Projection: The same goes for Woolen as for Bryant. While he has exceptional athleticism, Woolen will need to prove he has the technique and the speed to cover NFL receivers before he’s given a meaningful role as part of this defense.

Pick No. 158: Ohio State EDGE Tyreke Smith

Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Measurables: 6-foot-3, 254 pounds, 33.25″ arms, 10.25″ hands

Projection: Smith will most likely be on the bottom end of Seattle’s edge rusher rotation. However, he did enough at Ohio State to believe he could be a useful third-down piece right away. His main competition for snaps will come from Mafe and Alton Robinson – who is now officially on notice.

Pick No. 229: Rutgers WR Bo Melton

Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Measurables: 5-foot-11, 189 pounds, 31.25″ arms, 9″ hands

Projection: With Tyler Lockett and D.K. Metcalf taking up so much oxygen there’s not much room left for targets in Seattle’s WR room – especially after they drafted Dee Eskridge in Round 2 last year. However, Melton’s age may give him a leg up over the other receivers like Freddie Swain and Penny Hart, with whom he’ll be competing for snaps. His performance during the preseason may be critical in determining his exact role.

Pick No. 233: Lenoir-Rhyne WR Dareke Young

Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

Measurables: 6-foot-2, 224 pounds, 32.625″ arms, 10.125″ hands

Projection: It’s often difficult for any seventh-round pick to find a long-term home in the NFL, and Young will likely be no exception. He faces an uphill battle trying to carve out room for himself in a wide receiver group that’s one of the deepest in the elague. However, his size gives him an advantage that nobody else outside D.K. Metcalf has at this position.

1

1

1

1