Here’s what scouting reports said about RB Khalil Herbert before the 2021 NFL Draft

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Chicago Bears quarterback Justin Fields (1) and running back Khalil Herbert (24) participate in drills during the NFL football team’s rookie minicamp Friday, May, 14, 2021, in Lake Forest Ill. (AP Photo/David Banks, Pool)

The Chicago Bears’ selection of former Virginia Tech running back Khalil Herbert in the sixth round of the 2021 NFL Draft earned high marks from draft analysts across the internet who viewed the Hokies offensive weapon as a very good value pick in the later portion of Day 3.

Herbert now has an opportunity to earn a significant role in the Bears’ offense as Montgomery’s primary backup. It’s a role that will be one of the more competitive training camp battles this summer.

Here’s what some of the pre-draft scouting reports said about Herbert leading up to the 2021 draft.

May 15, 2021; Lake Forest, Illinois, USA; Chicago Bears quarterback Justin Fields (1) passes the ball to running back Khalil Herbert (24) during rookie minicamp at Halas Hall. Mandatory Credit: Kamil Krzaczynski-USA TODAY Sports

NFL.com:

A tempo-based runner with a well-built, compact frame, Herbert runs with a good blend of vision and strength. The Kansas graduate transfer made his single season at Virginia Tech count with a strong showing, ranking among the FBS’ top five in rushing yards and yards per carry. He’s a little tight-hipped, which prevents him from being a true, one-cut runner, but his vision and speed to the corner make it work for him. He’s not a wiggle runner and needs to have some blocking up front to keep his feet moving, but his quick processing of the run lanes and smooth change of direction allow him to create yards for himself within the scheme. His lack of pass pro talent could hurt his draft value. He’s worthy of a Day 3 selection and has NFL backup talent.

May 15, 2021; Lake Forest, Illinois, USA; Chicago Bears quarterback Justin Fields (1) passes the ball to running back Khalil Herbert (24) during rookie minicamp at Halas Hall. Mandatory Credit: Kamil Krzaczynski-USA TODAY Sports

The Draft Network:

Khalil Herbert had a flashy run at Kansas before bursting onto the scene in a breakout campaign at Virginia Tech in 2020. In 11 games in 2020, Herbert logged 165 touches from scrimmage, tallying 1,362 yards with nine touchdowns. Herbert is a disciplined runner that plays within himself, has good vision, takes excellent angles, has good contact balance, and is a smooth operator. While he’s a good athlete, he isn’t overly dynamic—Herbert’s big plays come because of his decision making and how he sets up tacklers in space with smart cuts in addition to his sufficient burst. What Herbert is lacking is a proven ability to contribute on passing downs. Despite showcasing a willingness to pass block, Herbert was underwhelming at Virginia Tech in pass protection. In addition, he never caught more than 10 passes in any season for his career, so developing and proving his pass-catching skill set will be important for him to claim a prominent role in the NFL. At a minimum, Herbert should be a strong No. 2 back in the NFL that has starter ability if he can prove himself on passing downs.

Chicago Bears running back Khalil Herbert (24) runs during the NFL football team’s rookie minicamp Friday, May, 14, 2021, in Lake Forest Ill. (AP Photo/David Banks, Pool)

Ourlads:

He is one of the best backs, if not the best, in the entire class at gaining yards after contact. Has a stout, muscular frame but can move with plenty of twitch and a surprising level of burst. Physically, Herbert has it. Mentally, he shows advanced ability when it comes to reading the defense and reacting to it.