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Scott Rolen is headed to Baseball Hall of Fame. Here's where he ranks among best 3B ever.

One of the best baseball players to reach the majors from Indiana is going to into the Hall of Fame.

Sunday in Cooperstown, Scott Rolen will be enshrined amongst the game's best in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Born in Evansville, Rolen was a multi-sport standout at Jasper High School. He was a talented basketball player and a standout quarterback on the football field. During his senior season in 1993, he was the runner-up for IndyStar Mr. Basketball and was the Indiana Mr. Baseball winner.

A Carmel boy was dying. Scott Rolen quietly, without fanfare, became his best friend.

But where does Rolen rank amongst other all-time great third basemen based on career WAR (wins above replacement)?

*WAR measures a player's value in all facets of the game by deciphering how many more wins he's worth than a replacement-level player at his same position.

1. Mike Schmidt (Phillies)

Mike Schmidt, the former Philadelphia Phillies' third baseman, appears at a press conference after being elected into the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. Schmidt, the eighth third baseman inducted into the hall and the 26th player to be elected in his first year of eligibility, will be inducted in a ceremony in Cooperstown, New York on 30 July.

Career WAR: 106.8

Best Season: .282/.395/.546, 36 HR, 116 RBI, 23 stolen bases (9.8 WAR, 1974)

From a statistical standpoint, Mike Schmidt is the GOAT at the hot corner. Schmidt averaged 7.2 WAR over his 18-season career. He's a 12-time All-Star, 10-time Gold Glove winner, six-time Silver Slugger winner and three-time MVP. The Dayton native was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.

2. Eddie Mathews (Braves, Astros, Tigers)

Career WAR: 96

Best Season: .306/.390/.593, 46 HR, 114 RBI, 118 runs scored (8.2 WAR, 1959)

Schmidt has a sizable lead between himself and Mathews, the next best third baseman in baseball history, but Mathews was one of the best sluggers of his day. It's splitting hairs when choosing his best season. His 1959 season is .1 WAR better than his 1953 season where he hit .302 with 47 homers and 135 RBIs. Mathews earned 12 All-Star appearances. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978.

3. Adrian Beltre (Dodgers, Mariners, Red Sox, Rangers)

Former Texas Rangers' third baseman Adrian Beltre speaks at a ceremony to retire his jersey number before a game against the Oakland Athletics at Globe Life Park in Arlington on June 8, 2019 in Arlington, Texas.
Former Texas Rangers' third baseman Adrian Beltre speaks at a ceremony to retire his jersey number before a game against the Oakland Athletics at Globe Life Park in Arlington on June 8, 2019 in Arlington, Texas.

Career WAR: 93.5

Best Season: .334/388/.629, 48 HR, 121 RBIs, 104 runs scored (9.6 WAR, 2004)

Beltre is the only player on this list who is not in the Hall of Fame. Beltre retired in 2018 and will be eligible for the Hall in 2024. Probably the second-best defensive third baseman behind Brooks Robinson, his offensive explosion in 2004 earned him runner-up MVP honors. Somewhat of a late bloomer, most of his best seasons came after the age of 30. He's a four-time All-Star and five-time Gold Glove winner, just don't touch his head.

4. Wade Boggs (Red Sox, Yankees, Devil Rays)

Wade Boggs acknowledges the crowd prior to his number 26 retirement ceremony before the game between the Boston Red Sox and the Colorado Rockies at Fenway Park on May 26, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.
Wade Boggs acknowledges the crowd prior to his number 26 retirement ceremony before the game between the Boston Red Sox and the Colorado Rockies at Fenway Park on May 26, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.

Career WAR: 91.4

Best Season: .368/.450/.478, eight HR, 78 RBIs, 107 runs scored, 240 hits (9.1 WAR, 1985)

The player affectionately known as "Chicken Man" for his love of fried chicken before every game, may be the best pure-hitting third baseman ever. Boggs finished with a .328 batting average over 18 seasons. The 1985 season was his peak, but Boggs played at an All-Star level well into his late 30s. Boggs was a five-time batting champion, 12-time All-Star and a two-time Gold Glove winner. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.

5. George Brett (Royals)

Hall of Famer George Brett is introduced during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony at Clark Sports Center on July 27, 2014 in Cooperstown, New York.
Hall of Famer George Brett is introduced during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony at Clark Sports Center on July 27, 2014 in Cooperstown, New York.

Career WAR: 88.6

Best Season: .390, .454, .664, 24 HR, 118 RBIs, 15 stolen bases. (9.4 WAR, 1980)

Brett had a great peak and impressive longevity playing 21 seasons with the Kansas City Royals. Brett is a career .305 hitter with his average bumping up to .337 over 43 postseason games including a .373 average in World Series games. The infamous "Pine Tar Incident" is often what first comes to mind when thinking of Brett, but that shouldn't overshadow his stellar career. He's 18th all-time with 3,154 hits. A 13-time All-Star, 1980 MVP and 1985 Gold Glove winner, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

6. Chipper Jones (Braves)

Former Atlanta Braves third baseman and Hall of Fame inductee Chipper Jones of the Atlanta Braves addresses the crowd before the game against the Milwaukee Brewers at SunTrust Park on August 10, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia.
Former Atlanta Braves third baseman and Hall of Fame inductee Chipper Jones of the Atlanta Braves addresses the crowd before the game against the Milwaukee Brewers at SunTrust Park on August 10, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia.

Career WAR: 85.3

Best Season: .337/.425/.574, 29 HR, 102 RBIs, 108 runs scored, (7.6 WAR, 2007)

Living up to the hype of being the No. 1 overall pick 1990 makes Jones' career even more impressive. Jones won the MVP in 1999 but didn't have his best season statistically until nearly 10 years later. 1999 was Jones' best offensive season (.319/.441/.633, 45 HR, 110 RBIs, 25 stolen bases), but his -0.8 WAR makes his 2007 campaign his highest single-season WAR. Jones helped the Braves win the World Series in 1995, was an eight-time All-Star, two-time Silver Slugger and 1999 MVP. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018.

7. Brooks Robinson (Orioles)

Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson is introduced at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 24, 2011 in Cooperstown, New York.
Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson is introduced at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 24, 2011 in Cooperstown, New York.

Career WAR: 78.4

Best Season: .253/.304/.720, 17 HR, 75 RBIs, 36 doubles, six triples, .970 fielding percentage (8.4 WAR, 1968)

Robinson is one of the few players whose defensive ability surpassed what he did offensively. The "Human Vacuum Cleaner" debuted at 18 years old and became a full-time player at 21. Robinson is a 16-time Gold Glove winner. His 16 selections are second all-time to Greg Maddux's 18. His offensive WAR is 8.6 points higher than his defensive WAR. The 18-time All-Star and 1964 MVP was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

8. Paul Molitor (Brewers, Twins, Blue Jays)

Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Paul Molitor talks to the media July 24, 2004 in Cooperstown, New York.
Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Paul Molitor talks to the media July 24, 2004 in Cooperstown, New York.

Career WAR: 75.7

Best Season: .302/.366/.450 19 HR, 71 RBIs, 136 runs scored, 41 stolen bases (6.2 WAR, 1982)

Molitor was a versatile player playing every position on defense except catcher, but he played the majority of his 1,495 career games at third base. Molitor had impressive longevity with a career spanning 21 seasons across three decades (1978-98). Molitor's teammate Robin Yount (two-time MVP) earned more hardware during their time together in Milwaukee, but Molitor was a star in his own right. Molitor led the American League in hits and runs scored three times. He earned seven All-Star game appearances and four Silver Slugger awards. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

9. Ron Santo (Cubs, White Sox)

Former Chicago Cub third baseman Ron Santo speaks to the fans during a retirement ceremony for Santo's uniform number 10 before a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates on September 28, 2003 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois.
Former Chicago Cub third baseman Ron Santo speaks to the fans during a retirement ceremony for Santo's uniform number 10 before a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates on September 28, 2003 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois.

Career WAR: 70.5

Best Season: .300/.395/.512, 31 HR, 98 RBIs, 107 runs scored (9.8 WAR, 1967).

The run-producing righty is certainly worthy of inclusion on this list. Santo finished fourth in MVP voting during his best statistical season in 1967, but he had a higher WAR than winner Orlando Cepeda (6.8), Tim McCarver (6.0) and Roberto Clemente (9.0). Santo is a nine-time All-Star and five-time Gold Glove winner. He was inducted to the Hall of Fame by the Golden Era Committee in 2012.

10. Scott Rolen (Phillies, Cardinals, Blue Jays, Reds)

Scott Rolen #27 of the St. Louis Cardinals plays third base against the Philadelphia Phillies during the Opening Day game on April 3, 2006 at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Scott Rolen #27 of the St. Louis Cardinals plays third base against the Philadelphia Phillies during the Opening Day game on April 3, 2006 at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Career WAR: 70. 1

Best Season: .314/.409/.598, 34 HR, 124 RBIs, 109 runs scored (9.2 WAR, 2004)

The only native Hoosier on this list, Rolen is one of best third basemen of all-time and a solid all-around contributor over 17 seasons. His peak season exceeded five of the players listed ahead of him, but injuries prevented him from ranking higher. The Jasper grad debuted at age 21 and earned Rookie of the Year honors the following season. He's a seven-time All-Star, eight-time Gold Glove winner and 2002 NL Silver Slugger winner. Rolen has the highest WAR of any native Hoosier. East Chicago native Kenny Lofton's 68.4 career WAR is the second closest to Rolen.

This article originally appeared on Indianapolis Star: Baseball Hall of Fame: Where Scott Rolen ranks among best 3B history