Scott Brooks, Doc Rivers express disgust at attack on Capitol ahead of Wizards-Sixers

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Chase Hughes
·3 min read
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Scott Brooks, Doc Rivers express disgust at attack on Capitol originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

As rioters invaded and attacked the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., Scott Brooks and Doc Rivers watched in horror like many Americans, as images of chaos and violence against police officers were shown on television news networks. The two of them then got ready to coach a basketball game, as the Sixers are set to host the Wizards on Wednesday night.

The anarchy in the streets of D.C. hit close to home for both coaches. For Brooks, it was happening in the city he calls home. For Rivers, it was a reminder of what he believes are different standards held to protesters based on the color of their skin.

"On many different fronts, it’s sad. It’s definitely sad. We should be better than this," Brooks said. "What I see in the videos, it’s disgusting. This is a special place. You just hope that everybody from there, our fans; everybody’s safe. This should not be allowed. It’s unacceptable. This is America’s Capitol. You should not be able to do what I saw on video. It’s disgusting, it’s embarrassing and it should never happen."

"The symbolism of storming the Capitol without force done to them. If you’re a Black American, this definitely touches you in a different way. This is not a Black thing, this is an American thing, and we shouldn’t turn it into that. But it definitely makes you think, for sure," Rivers said.

Rivers went into more detail, echoing some of the comments he made over the summer following high profile incidents of police brutality.

"No police dogs turned on people, no billy clubs turned on people. People peacefully being escorted out of the Capitol. It shows that you can disperse a crowd peacefully, I guess, would be the one thing. It’s a sad day and in a lot of ways not good for our country that across the world people see this. But it’s part of what we are, so we have to solve it," he said.

Both coaches expressed hope and confidence the unrest and acts of domestic terrorism do not represent the country and its people as a whole. Rivers highlighted the runoff elections in Georgia on Tuesday as a symbol that democracy is still working despite the threats made to it in recent days and weeks.

"This is not the masses. The masses have spoken. I’m so proud of Georgia, Georgia spoke," Rivers said. "This is not the masses. This is a group of people that have decided to be unruly."

Brooks said he has had conversations about the events in Washington with coaches and that he expects to talk further with his players and others in the organization. He added there have been no discussions about the team going back to Washington on Wednesday night after the game. They play in Boston on Friday.

Brooks was planning to do his best to compartmentalize and go on with Wednesday's game.

"We have to [play]. This is our job. This is what we have to do. It’s a couple hours out of the day," Brooks said.

"We all feel the same. It’s just disgusting, but we have to be better. Democracy is there for a reason. It’s all everybody has fought for. It’s sad and embarrassing."

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