Ryan Fitzpatrick's reported retirement is a time to recap his unique career

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Recapping all the numbers Ryan Fitzpatrick put up as a pro originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

With Ryan Fitzpatrick reportedly retired, it's time to take a moment to recap all of the numbers that the quarterback posted in his unique NFL career.

Actually, this is going to take multiple moments.

From 2005 to 2021, the former 250th overall draft pick suited up for nine different pro franchises.

That means the ex-Ram/Bengal/Bill/Titan/Texan/Jet/Buccaneer/Dolphin/Football Teamer spent time with almost a third of the sport's 32 organizations.

"Every week is a revenge game for me," Fitzpatrick told the Washington media soon after joining the club in 2021, "because I've been on every dang team in the NFL."

Yes, he was exaggerating. But no, it wasn't that much of a stretch.

During his time with all of those different squads, Fitzpatrick threw... and threw... and threw.

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In all, he totaled 5,060 passing attempts —  good enough for 28th-most all time, placing him ahead of signal-callers like Troy Aikman and Jim Kelly — and 3,072 completions. With 10 more yards, he would've made it to the 35,000-yard mark.

As for the most key tosses on his résumé, Fitz tallied 223 touchdowns in the NFL and, of course, was picked off plenty — 169 times in fact.

Those interceptions, when coupled with the 300 sacks he suffered after his college days at Harvard, represent the riskier side of his playing style and are what largely prevented him from ever becoming a true starter as opposed to the traveling starter he was.

That said, he got the nod on numerous occasions to lead the variety of offenses he was a part of. While Fitzpatrick's 147 starts only resulted in 59 wins against 87 losses and one tie, his ability to earn the trust of the cavalcade of coaches he overlapped with is nonetheless worthy of recognition.

It also speaks to his personal drive.

"I've just had to scratch and claw for every opportunity that I've ever received," Fitzpatrick said in that same press conference with Washington reporters. "I take a lot of pride in being able to do what I do and being successful jumping from team to team."

Fitzpatrick's final stop, unfortunately, will be remembered as the stint where the prolific passer was unusually quiet.

That wasn't by choice, obviously, as a hip injury forced him to the I.R. after a mere six attempts and 13 yards in the Football Team's opener versus the Chargers.

Sadly, that incident kept him from trying to make the postseason in his 17th campaign, therefore solidifying him as a playoff-less player.

Still, despite Fitzpatrick's career being filled with many, if not more, downs than ups, him registering so much of both is an achievement on its own.

A bunch of his peers have and will experience more triumphs, but none of them can match his straight-up experiences.

"It's me," Fitzpatrick said last March. "It's part of my story."

And it's a story that, in all likelihood, will never be duplicated.