Russell Westbrook's Tulsa documentary earns three Emmy nominations

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Westbrook's Tulsa documentary earns three Emmy nominations originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

The critically acclaimed documentary executive produced by Wizards star point guard Russell Westbrook has earned three Emmy nominations. 

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Westbrook's debut production got the nod to get a chance at some Academy Awards in "outstanding writing for a nonfiction Program," "outstanding music composition for a documentary series or special (original dramatic score)," and "outstanding sound editing for a nonfiction or reality program." 

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RELATED: Russell Westbrook's documentary on the Tulsa Race Massacre premieres May 30

It's clear attaching Westbrook's name to the documentary was a touching tribute to his first NBA team to devote his resources to a film that's affected the Oklahoma region so clearly, but also must have an added sense of accomplishment to work alongside such gifted script and sound talent.

A little over 100 miles away from the Thunder's facilities in Oklahoma City, Tulsa was the location of a race massacre a century ago in 1921 when 35 city blocks of "Black Wall Street" were burned to the ground and hundreds from the Black community were killed. The Greenwood District in Tulsa was the wealthiest area of color in the country. 

Along with three-time Emmy award-winning directors Stanley Nelson Jr. and Marco Williams, Westbrook's film shines a light on the injustice over those two bloody days, and the reconstruction of the area -- and recovery of unmarked graves -- that has taken place since. Before the Emmys on Sept. 19, you can watch the documentary on the History Network and Hulu. 

"This is one of many overlooked stories of African Americans in this country that deserves to be told," Westbrook, who noted he was not taught about this event in school, said in a release.  "These are the stories we must honor and amplify so we can learn from the past and create a better future."

If there's one thing the Wizards have learned since acquiring Westbrook, doing it the right way and leading others to do the same usually ends in some favorable results.