Rondale Moore would help upgrade Washington's offense from fast to FAST

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Peter Hailey
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This likely 1st-rounder would make WFT's fast offense FAST originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

Speed in football is like putting in golf: It's a trait that will never go out of style.

And that is why one NFL Draft prospect generated so much buzz on Tuesday.

While auditioning for pro scouts at Purdue, wide receiver Rondale Moore ran the 40-yard dash in a miniscule 4.29 seconds. 

Reading about that feat doesn't do Moore justice, though. Therefore, you should also watch the clip from his sprint, which literally won't take up much of your time:

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Now, even though he's just 5-foot-7, and even though his freshman campaign for the Boilermakers was by far his most productive, Moore is projected by many to go in the first round of the draft next month. His check-the-stopwatch-three-times 40-yard dash will only help his cause, too.

And if the Washington Football Team, slated to pick 19th overall, wanted to be bold, they could take Moore there if he's still on the board.

Before getting into why that move admittedly feels unlikely, let's touch on what makes it so enticing. 

In Curtis Samuel and Terry McLaurin, the Burgundy and Gold have two pass catchers who are blazers like Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum are Blazers. Slotting Moore in — most likely in the slot — along with those two would give Scott Turner a third legit burner to involve in the passing attack.

Moore isn't just absurdly speedy, however; he's also flexible in terms of where he can be used. Purdue let him line up a handful of times in the backfield, and he also was deployed as a kick and punt returner, which is a position that Ron Rivera would love to improve.

That means Moore would be just another multifaceted player for Washington to confuse defenses with, plus whatever value he could bring on special teams. With Samuel now on the roster, the unit already has the potential to be lethal. Yet introducing Moore and Samuel on that side of the ball — in addition to mainstays like McLaurin, Antonio Gibson, JD McKissic and Logan Thomas — could make the group downright nasty.

Unfortunately, Moore, like any prospect, comes with drawbacks and concerns.

As already mentioned, he is really small, and Washington's going to be starting two smaller wideouts in Week 1. Ryan Fitzpatrick and the other quarterbacks might be better off with a larger target coming from the draft, if that's a spot the franchise opts to supplement with their most premium selection at the end of April.

Also, after going off for 114 grabs in 13 games across his debut season with Purdue, Moore saw action in just four matchups as a sophomore and three contests as a junior. COVID limited him in 2020, but his 2019 was shortened by a knee injury, and durability is going to be a primary, inevitable question for someone of his size.

That said, if Moore is able to overcome those possible problems, he's got the top-line explosiveness to immediately energize any team. The guy has rare athleticism, plain and simple. 

Overall, it's true that, as of now, Washington has more pressing needs than further strengthening the offense's skill guys. Linebacker and left tackle are two such places the team could vastly improve with its first-round choice, and it's probable that a chunk of readers who've made it to this juncture of the story have already made that point in their head — or even aloud, if they're especially fired up.

But on the other hand, the thought of adding even more speed is always attractive. Always. Should Washington completely stick to the best player available approach that is routinely emphasized, Moore might be too good to ignore.