Richard Sherman 'frustrated' with Sha'Carri Richardson Olympics controversy

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Sherman 'frustrated' with handling of Richardson Olympics issue originally appeared on NBC Sports Bayarea

Richard Sherman was among the many who spoke out against U.S. track star Sha'Carri Richardson losing her spot in the 100-meter dash at the Tokyo Olympics after testing positive for marijuana during the Olympic Trials.

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Richardson told the Today Show on Friday that she used cannabis to cope with the loss of her biological mother, which occurred a week before the Olympic Trials in Eugene, Ore.

The 21-year-old finished first in the 100-meter event with a time of 10.86 seconds, but her positive test for cannabis invalidated the results. Richardson received a month-long ban from the United States Olympic Committee, but still potentially could compete in the 4x100 meter relay at the Tokyo Games.

If Richardson hadn't been banned for her positive test, she likely wouldn't have had to answer any questions about why she used the substance during the lead-up to her first Olympics.

Although the International Olympic Committee hasn't, other professional sports leagues in the U.S. have lessened restrictions on marijuana use.

RELATED: Richardson will miss Olympic 100M after positive marijuana test

The NBA removed it from the banned substance list in the bubble last fall, and kept that in effect for the 2020-21 season.

The NFL also adjusted its policy on marijuana use in its most recent CBA, increasing the THC threshold for a positive test and lightening the punishments for those who do test positive.

Many states now have legalized or decriminalized marijuana, and just about every state in the union at least has it available for medicinal use.