Rep.-elect Ilhan Omar responds to minister saying Congress will 'look like an Islamic republic,' and Twitter is here for it

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Yahoo Lifestyle
Rep.-elect Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., responds to a conservative minister who complained about hijabs on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives. (Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
Rep.-elect Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., responds to a conservative minister who complained about hijabs on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives. (Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

America is known as a melting pot where people can practice freedom of religion. Conservative minister E.W. Jackson, however, appears to believe that not every religion should be represented in Congress.

After reports that Democrats were attempting to reverse a 181-year-old ban on headwear on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, Jackson made a comment on his radio show, calling out Rep.-elect Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., who wears a hijab.

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“The floor of Congress is now going to look like an Islamic republic,” Jackson said, according to the Hill. “We are a Judeo-Christian country.” He continued, “We are a nation rooted and grounded in Christianity and that’s that. And anybody that doesn’t like that, go live somewhere else. It’s very simple. Just go live somewhere else. Don’t try to change our country into some sort of Islamic republic or try to base our country on Sharia law.”

Omar and Rep.-elect Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., will be the first Muslim women in Congress.

Omar responded to Jackson on Friday through Twitter.


According to the Pew Research Center, there were an estimated 3.45 million Muslim Americans in the United States in 2017. It projected that by 2040, Muslims will replace Jews as the country’s second-largest religious group after Christians.

People on Twitter were not shy about expressing their support for Omar — or calling out Jackson.





Rev. Chuck Currie was quick to voice support for Omar as well.


Jackson went on to say that he was not Islamophobic, but his comments seem to speak for themselves: “The fact that we’re electing these people to Congress and electing them to office is just beyond the pale,” he said. “Now, don’t get me wrong, I believe in the freedom of religion, I believe in the First Amendment, but I’ll tell you what, I’m not voting for a Muslim to serve in any office. Me, personally, I’m not doing it. I’m not doing it. Period. I’m not doing it.”

He added, “The threat to humanity is not merely radical Islam. The threat to humanity is Islam, period. That’s right, I said it and I mean it.”

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