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Report: College football to approve three significant rule changes for 2024 season

College football is set to approve three significant rule changes for the 2024 season, according to a report from Yahoo’s Ross Dellenger.

The three changes are expected to come after meetings this week regarding the future of the sport. The news coincides with speculation about the future of the College Football Playoff and the general structure of the sport.

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One notable recent change to the game is the elimination of stopping the clock while the chains are reset on first downs. That, plus some of the reported upcoming changes reflects a longer trend of the college game working to be more like the NFL product.

Again, that’s what’s happening again this offseason. Here are the rule changes expected to be approved by college football leaders for the 2024 season:

Electronic helmet communication

Michigan quarterback J.J. McCarthy (9) warms up near head coach Jim Harbaugh before the game Nov. 26, 2022 against Ohio State at Ohio Stadium in Columbus. Junfu Han-USA TODAY NETWORK
Michigan quarterback J.J. McCarthy (9) warms up near head coach Jim Harbaugh before the game Nov. 26, 2022 against Ohio State at Ohio Stadium in Columbus. Junfu Han-USA TODAY NETWORK

This change would allow coaches to communicate with players electronically, instead of holding up posterboards or using signs.

Sign-stealing was a hot-button issue in 2023 when a Michigan staffer was secretly attending games and recording the opponent’s sideline. This technology already exists in the NFL and seems to be universally supported.

Tablets allowed on the sideline and during halftime

Dec. 27, 2020; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Indianapolis Colts punter Rigoberto Sanchez (8) and long snapper Luke Rhodes (46) look at a tablet device on the sidelines against the Pittsburgh Steelers during the third quarter at Heinz Field. The Steelers won 28-24. Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports
Dec. 27, 2020; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Indianapolis Colts punter Rigoberto Sanchez (8) and long snapper Luke Rhodes (46) look at a tablet device on the sidelines against the Pittsburgh Steelers during the third quarter at Heinz Field. The Steelers won 28-24. Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports

Seen above is an example from the NFL, where it seems everyone on the sideline is looking at video on a tablet of some kind.

This change, along with allowing the direct radio link between a coach’s headset and a player’s helmet, seems to be a general movement toward modernizing the game and following the NFL’s lead with its technology.

A 2-minute warning

Sept. 2, 2023; Madison, Wisconsin; Wisconsin Badgers head coach Luke Fickell talks in a huddle during the second quarter against the Buffalo Bulls at Camp Randall Stadium. Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports
Sept. 2, 2023; Madison, Wisconsin; Wisconsin Badgers head coach Luke Fickell talks in a huddle during the second quarter against the Buffalo Bulls at Camp Randall Stadium. Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports

This is where I’ll throw a flag.

College football recently changed its clock rules. It no longer stops after first downs while the chains are reset. The language surrounding these changes is it makes the game ‘more efficient,’ when in reality it just adds more stoppages so broadcasts can increase the ad inventory.

The 2-minute warning is the same thing in my opinion. Here’s another clear stoppage in play for television networks to sell another prime-time ad block.

I was always told to not celebrate the dollar signs on a television deal, as it does not signify the health of the sport. This is the case here, as the people who end up paying for that dollar sign are the viewers. More expensive television deals means more of a need for advertisements during the game, which only takes away from the viewing experience.

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Story originally appeared on Badgers Wire