Rasheed Wallace can still drain 3-pointers with both hands at the same time

Ball Don't Lie
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 02: Rasheed Wallace #36 of the New York Knicks argues his second technical foul and ejection with referee Courtney Kirkland #61 in the game against the Phoenix Suns at Madison Square Garden on December 2, 2012 in New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Phoenix Suns v New York Knicks

NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 02: Rasheed Wallace #36 of the New York Knicks argues his second technical foul and ejection with referee Courtney Kirkland #61 in the game against the Phoenix Suns at Madison Square Garden on December 2, 2012 in New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Rasheed Wallace has been a great many things in his basketball life — a high school player of the year, a second-team All-American, an NBA All-Star, an NBA champion, a key figure in the evolution of the way big men played at the highest level, a principled disputer of most (if not all) officiating decisions, a first-rate dancer and, of course, an endlessly quotable inspiration.

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Lest you forget, however, he is also one of the game's truly great trick-shot artists. Now retired and 41 years young, 'Sheed evidently has not let that particular skill fall by the wayside, and thanks to Detroit Pistons point guard Brandon Jennings, we've got the proof:

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Honestly, even if all the reportedly forthcoming Champions League winds up producing is a charity game or two in which 'Sheed does something like this once or twice while barking at younger dudes, it'd be worth the price of admission.

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Let us now step into our time machines and whisk ourselves back to the halcyon days of the mid-to-late-2000s, when Wallace, then a member of the Pistons, performed such feats of ambidextrous derring-do on the regular at Detroit practices, barely breaking a sweat between attempts and always finding the time to yell some stuff at Tayshaun Prince while he was in the middle of an interview:

After seeing a clip like the one Jennings shared, part of me wishes Rasheed would return to the ranks of NBA assistant coaches, just so he can once more bust up youngbloods in shooting contests on a day-to-day basis. The more I think about it, though, the more I'm at peace with 'Sheed existing on the periphery of our NBA lives. I wouldn't want to run the risk of getting bored with consistent random acts of delightful 'Sheed-based absurdity; it's just too wonderful to reconnect with him after a while away and see that he is still, at base, the same inimitable and indomitable figure. Rasheed Wallace always was too quizzical for the quotidian. Long may he remain that way, loudly getting buckets with both hands all the while.

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Dan Devine is an editor for Ball Don't Lie on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at devine@yahoo-inc.com or follow him on Twitter!

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