Wolf population at risk

Wolf hunting and trapping that have killed more than 500 of the predators across the Northern Rockies. Hundreds of the animals have been killed -- mostly through hunting -- less than a year after being removed from the U.S. endangered species list. Restrictions on gray wolf harvests around Yellowstone are under consideration as the state prepares to kick off its inaugural wolf trapping season on Dec. 15, 2012. Conservation groups want limits on trapping after several wolves collared by park scientists for research were shot by Montana hunters in recent weeks.

This March, 2007 photo provided by National Park Service photographer Doug Smith shows a Gibbon wolf pack standing on snow in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Restrictions on gray wolf harvests around Yellowstone are under consideration as the state prepares to kick off its inaugural wolf trapping season on Dec. 15, 2012. Conservation groups want limits on trapping after several wolves collared by park scientists for research were shot by Montana hunters in recent weeks. (AP Photo/National Park Service, Doug Smith)

This March, 2007 photo provided by National Park Service photographer Doug Smith shows a Gibbon wolf pack standing on snow in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Restrictions on gray wolf harvests around Yellowstone are under consideration as the state prepares to kick off its inaugural wolf trapping season on Dec. 15, 2012. Conservation groups want limits on trapping after several wolves collared by park scientists for research were shot by Montana hunters in recent weeks. (AP Photo/National Park Service, Doug Smith)

This August 2012 photo shows an image provided by Wolves of the Rockies of the Lamar Canyon wolf pack on a hillside in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. The pack’s alpha female was shot Dec. 6, 2012, in Wyoming, among at least five collared wolves from Yellowstone killed by hunters this fall. Four more wolves collared in the park but no longer living there also have been shot. (AP Photo/Wolves of the Rockies)

FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2006, file photo provided by Michigan Technological University, a gray wolf is shown on Isle Royale National Park in northern Michigan. Six decades after gray wolves made their way to the park by crossing a Lake Superior ice bridge from Canada, the population is on the verge of dying out. Scientists who lead one of the world's longest studies of predator and prey in a closed ecosystem say just nine wolves remain on the wilderness island park. (AP Photo/Michigan Technological University, John Vucetich)

File-This August 2005 file photo provided by the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks shows a gray wolf pup from the Calder Mountain pack along the Montana and Idaho borders west of Troy, Mont. A federal appeals court has turned down a lawsuit from conservation groups seeking to block wolf hunting and trapping that have killed more than 500 of the predators across the Northern Rockies in recent months. (AP Photo/Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Kent Lauden, File)