Visa Pour l’Image: A peek at the exhibitions at the International Festival of Photojournalism

The 26th annual Visa Pour l’Image, the Cannes Film Festival” of photojournalism, kicks off next week, filling the French city of Perpignan with more than 3,000 of the world’s best photojournalists and photo editors, along with agencies from around the world, converging to share tips, contacts, more than a few drinks, and the best of the world’s photographic images.

This year’s Visa Pour l'Image showcases 26 exhibitions around the city. In a year renowned for violence against journalists, many are anticipating a retrospective of recently fallen Associated Press photographer Anja Neidringhaus’ work, as well as images from the late Chris Hondros tribute book ‘Testament.’ The exhibition ‘Amateurs make the front page’ promises some surprises on a variety of subjects.

Meetings, seminars and lectures fill the days, followed by nightly outdoor screenings. Each evening event begins with a news reel of the best work from the breaking news of the year and award presentations. Among the most anticipated is this year's video presentation of the new book ‘Photographer's Paradise: Turbulent America 1960-1990,’ by award winning veteran photojournalist Jean Pierre Laffont.

Visa Pour l’Image, directed by Jean-François Leroy, starts August 30 and continues through September 14.

Here’s a preview of the exhibitions.

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Anja Niedringhaus / Associated Press - Tribute

Anja Niedringhaus was one of the most talented, bravest and accomplished photojournalists of her generation. Her senseless death at the hands of Afghan police officer on April 4, 2014 deprived the world of an extraordinary person. Her storytelling skill with a camera was extraordinarily effective, a reflection of her own open gaze and genuine compassion for her subjects. Her enthusiasm and good cheer were infectious, even in the darkest of circumstances. She consistently volunteered for the hardest assign- ments and was remarkably resilient in carrying them out time after time. She truly believed in the need to bear witness.

Anja Niedringhaus / Associated Press - Tribute

A Libyan rebel urging people to leave as shells fired by Gadhafi's forces landed on the front outside Bin Jawaad, 150 km east of Sirte.
Central Libya, March 29, 2011.
(© Anja Niedringhaus / Associated Press)

Anja Niedringhaus / Associated Press - Tribute

Boys studying in a makeshift school in the village of Budyali.
Nengarhar Province, Afghanistan, March 19, 2013.
(© Anja Niedringhaus / Associated Press)

Typhoon in the Philippines: AFP, leading in the wake of Haiyan

On November 8, 2013, eyes around the world were focused on the Philippines after typhoon Haiyan struck. Within a few minutes, whole districts had been flattened, demolished by the extraordinary force of the typhoon with winds gusting over 315 km/h (c. 200 mph). The toll was more than 8000 dead and missing. The AFP reporters who reached the site the next day discovered an apocalyptic landscape. Their photos vividly convey the extent of the disaster and the distress of the survivors.

Typhoon in the Philippines: AFP, leading in the wake of Haiyan

Tolosa, island of Leyte, eastern Philippines, November 18, 2013.
A religious procession ten days after Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the area.  According to United Nations estimates, 13 million people were affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan, and 1.9 million lost their homes.
(© Philippe Lopez / Agence France-Presse)

Typhoon in the Philippines: AFP, leading in the wake of Haiyan

Tacloban, island of Leyte, eastern Philippines, November 11, 2013.
A survivor in the midst of the debris after Super Typhoon Haiyan.
(© Noel Celis / Agence France-Presse)

Mary F. Calvert / Zuma Press -Canon Female Photojournalist Award 2013 presented by the AFJ

The Battle Within: Sexual Assault in Americaâs Military --- Women who join the US Armed Forces are being raped and sexually assaulted by their colleagues in record numbers. An estimated 26,000 rapes and sexual assaults took place in the armed forces last year; only one in seven victims reported their attacks, and just one in ten of those cases went to trial. Many victims fear retaliation, demotion or being kicked out of the military, because they have seen it happen to others. The abuse is often considered simply a breach of conduct and not a criminal offense. The effects of Military Sexual Trauma, include depression, substance abuse, paranoia and feelings of isolation. Victims spend years drowning in shame and fear as the psychological damage silently eats away at their lives: many frequently end up addicted to drugs and alcohol, homeless or take their own lives.

Mary F. Calvert / Zuma Press -Canon Female Photojournalist Award 2013 presented by the AFJ

Sergeant Jennifer Norris was 21 when she joined the US Air Force, and was drugged and raped by her recruiter at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. Nancy Parrish, President of the association “Protect Our Defenders,” is seen comforting her after she testified at the hearing of the US House Committee on Armed Services on Capitol Hill.

(© Mary F. Calvert / Zuma Press)
Canon Female Photojournalist Award 2013 presented by the AFJ

Mary F. Calvert / Zuma Press -Canon Female Photojournalist Award 2013 presented by the AFJ

Tiffany Berkland and Elisha Morrow joined the Coast Guard and were sexually harassed by the same company commander during their basic training. Their case went to trial, and they met another woman who had recently been raped by the same company commander.  Berkland and Morrow are now guilt ridden, wishing they had come forward earlier. They are seen attending a workshop on how to handle the Veteran Affairs process for Military Sexual Trauma [MST] claims, during the Truth and Justice Summit on MST in Washington, D.C.

(© Mary F. Calvert / Zuma Press)
Canon Female Photojournalist Award 2013 presented by the AFJ

The Bald Eagle in the Aleutian Islands

by Klaus Nigge / National Geographic Creative for National Geographic Magazine --- The Bald Eagle, as the national symbol of the United States of America, is grand and majestic, but is also a bird living in a world of rain and dirt, of skies bright and dark, hunting and fighting - a true eagle. Klaus Nigge traveled to the Aleutian Islands where there is a large population of bald eagles. There it is either raining, or just lousy weather. At Dutch Harbor on Unalaska Island, the largest fishing port in the States, the eagles are not shy, being used to human contact, offering original opportunities to the photographer.

The Bald Eagle in the Aleutian Islands

Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), in the rain. Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, January 2007.
(© Klaus Nigge / National Geographic Creative for National Geographic Magazine)

The Bald Eagle in the Aleutian Islands

Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) moving towards another eagle on the beach, in a fight over food. Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, July 2010.
(© Klaus Nigge / National Geographic Creative for National Geographic Magazine)

Football as seen through the eyes of children in Cidade de Deus favela

by Christophe Simon/AFP --- Christophe Simon, AFP chief photographer in Brazil, gathered together a group of 18 teen- agers in Cidade de Deus favela in Rio de Janeiro, and, working together, they photographed their everyday life featuring their love of football, and at a time before every camera in the world was focused on Brazil and the 2014 Football World Cup. While covering "pacification" in the favelas, Christophe had realized just how fascinated the teenagers in these neighborhoods were by the job of photoreporter.

Football as seen through the eyes of children in Cidade de Deus favela

April, 2013. Children playing football in Cidade de Deus favela.
(© Christophe Simon / AFP)

Football as seen through the eyes of children in Cidade de Deus favela

May, 2013. Football in Cidade de Deus favela. The picture was taken by a child participating in the photography project organized by AFP for children at Cidade de Deus favela.  
(© Danielo / AFP)

Sebastián Liste / NOOR for Time Magazine and Fotopres "La Caixa" Grant

On the Inside: Venezuelan Prisons Under Inmate Control --- Vista Hermosa is a notorious prison in Venezuela. With violence plaguing the country, there are more and more prisoners, and more clashes between prisoners and guards. The authorities have made no attempt to improve conditions, and have let the situation degenerate into near chaos. National Guards patrol outside the walls, while the inmates live and die in a world of their own making on the inside. Exhibition co-produced with the Photographic Social Vision Foundation.

Sebastián Liste / NOOR for Time Magazine and Fotopres "La Caixa" Grant

Vista Hermosa (Beautiful View) prison, Ciudad Bolivar, Venezuela, March 2013.
A routine check by members of the Carro, an armed group of inmates who guard the prison. Wilmer Brizuela (Wilmito, the Pran) is the unchallenged leader and maintains that his management of the prison, with nearly 2000 inmates, is more humane than the official system of the Venezuelan prison authorities, who have been widely criticized by human rights groups. The security tower in the background, keeping watch for any escapees, is manned by a member of the military.
(© Sebastián Liste / NOOR for Time Magazine and Fotopres "La Caixa" Grant)

Sebastián Liste / NOOR for Time Magazine and Fotopres "La Caixa" Grant

Vista Hermosa prison, Ciudad Bolivar, Venezuela, March 2013.
A celebration inside the prison while family members are visiting. Wilmito and his gang took control of the prison by force, and the inmates are now allowed two family visits a week. In September 2008, family overnights were instituted as part of a prison humanization plan.
(© Sebastián Liste / NOOR for Time Magazine and Fotopres "La Caixa" Grant)

Rohingyas, a Silenced Minority

by Bruno Amsellem / Signatures --- Since June 2012, the Rohingya people of Burma have been victims of violent and sometimes deadly attacks by local communities, as the authorities stand by, virtually condoning the attacks. The Rohingya Muslim minority were rendered stateless in Burma's 1982 citizenship act, and according to the United Nations they are one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. Over the past two years, prominent Buddhists have been inciting the Burmese people to hate. Entire villages have been burned and razed in Arakan (Rakhine) State in north-west Burma. Hundreds have been left dead in the wake of the violence which has spread to the center of the country. Camps for displaced persons near the city of Sittwe, the capital of Arakan State, now house 140 000 Rohingyas who are denied freedom of movement and healthcare. Bruno Amsellem visited the camps where westerners and humanitarian workers are kept under strict surveillance by the authorities.

Rohingyas, a Silenced Minority

Since the riots in June 2012, more than 140 000 Rohingyas, the Muslim minority community in Burma, have been living in camps for internally displaced persons in Arakan state. Sittwe, Burma (Myanmar), August 2013.
(© Bruno Amsellem / Signatures)

Rohingyas, a Silenced Minority

Muslim refugees in a camp in Yin Daw, near Meiktila in central Burma, after the clashes in March 2013. The camp is not on the official list of the national authorities. Support is provided by private donors. Meiktila, Burma (Myanmar), August 2013.
(© Bruno Amsellem / Signatures)

Mongolia - there is no El Dorado

by Olivier Laban-Mattei / The Mongolian Project / MYOP --- It is time to put an end to the latter-day myth that Mongolia is the new El Dorado. It certainly is not. Mongolia is not a land blessed by the gods, a rich land offering wealth to any and every fortune hunter as the international media would have us believe. Quite the opposite. Social inequality has been made dramatically worse by intensive mining, with serious effects on human health and the environ- ment. The first victims are, of course, the people of Mongolia. With polluted air, water and land, the prevalence of pollution-related disease and appalling hygiene and health has soared, but the authorities persistently deny this, preferring to promote an idyllic image of their country in a bid to attract ever more foreign investors.

Mongolia - there is no El Dorado

Winter in Bayan Khoshuu, a poor district known as the yurt neighborhood, in Ulan Bator. Winter temperatures go down to  40° or  50º C ( 40°/ 60° F) forcing thousands to burn vast quantities of coal for heating, leaving a thick cloud of smoke over the city, and causing serious diseases from air pollution. In winter Ulan Bator is one of the most polluted cities in the world.
(© Olivier Laban-Mattei / The Mongolian Project / MYOP)

Mongolia - there is no El Dorado

In one of the main city dumps in Ulan Bator, people are searching for scraps of plastic to sell to Chinese recycling firms. Waste management is a critical health problem for the local community, but to date nothing has been done to improve conditions in the city.
(© Olivier Laban-Mattei / The Mongolian Project / MYOP)

William Daniels/Panos Pictures -Winner of the Humanitarian Visa dâor award â International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) 2014

Humanitarian Crisis in the Central African Republic --- The Central African Republic has been plunged into an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. After a year of terror led by the mainly Muslim rebel Seleka group, anti-Balaka militia wreaked revenge on the Muslims in the west of the country who fled or were killed. Entire districts were tar- geted; even women and children were victims of grenade attacks. There was little response from the international community; soldiers with the African-led International Support Mission in the CAR (MISCA) and French troops struggled to stop the massacres and ethnic cleansing. Nearly one million (one fourth of the population) fled, be- coming displaced persons, needing food and medical care in conditions with no proper security.

William Daniels/Panos Pictures -Winner of the Humanitarian Visa dâor award â International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) 2014

A grieving relative of Sept-Abel Sangomalet, a 20-year-old Christian killed by Muslims who entered the family home and stabbed him in his sleep.
(© William Daniels / Panos Pictures)
Winner of the Humanitarian Visa d’or award – International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) 2014

William Daniels/Panos Pictures -Winner of the Humanitarian Visa dâor award â International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) 2014

Displaced persons protesting against the shortage of food at Don Bosco camp, housing 18 000 people who fled Bangui because of violence between Seleka and anti-Balaka fighters.
(© William Daniels / Panos Pictures)
Winner of the Humanitarian Visa d’or award – International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) 2014

Central African Republic

by Pierre Terdjman --- The Seleka militia took over in March 2013, and perpetrated massive violations of human rights - massacres, rape, torture and executions, and burning villages to the ground. Nearly one fifth of the population has had to flee and they are now living in appalling conditions in the bush and IDP camps. In September, the predominantly Christian anti- Balaka militia embarked on a wave of reprisals against the Muslims with massacres, summary executions and looting; the sides had changed, but the violence continued. Terrified Muslims fled north-west, to towns such as Bossangoa and Bouca which are traditionally Muslim. Of the 100 000 Muslims that lived in Bangui, only one thousand are left; the others have fled across the border. Today it seems unlikely that any change will occur. The rift may very well be permanent.

Central African Republic

A wounded man in the community hospital.
(© Pierre Terdjman)
Exhibition: Paris Match.

Terror and Tears in the Central African Republic

by Michaël Zumstein / Agence VU' for Le Monde ---

In March 2013, the Muslim-dominated Seleka rebel movement seized power in Bangui,
bringing the corrupt regime of François Bozizé to an end.
But a reign of terror ensued, for weeks, as soldiers backing the new president, Michel Djotodia, led a wave of violence and         looting targeting Christian communities.Michaël Zumstein has made a number of trips to the Central African Republic, the first in September 2013 when he saw violent attacks on Christian civilians. And he was there when Christian self-defense anti-Balaka militia gained control and Muslims were forced to flee. His photographs stand as a record of the unprecedented violence that continues unabated.

Exhibition co-produced with Amnesty International.

Terror and Tears in the Central African Republic

Central African Republic, Njoh, September 24, 2013
Men claiming to be anti-Balaka fighters, opposed to the Seleka, are seen posing with their weapons in the main street of Njoh.
(© Michaël Zumstein / Agence VU' for Le Monde)

The Eye of the Storm

by Sean Sutton / MAG / Panos Pictures --- Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines on 8 November 2013 killing more than 6,000 people. Haiyan, known locally as Yolanda, had sustained winds of 315kph, making it the strongest typhoon ever to reach landfall. Much of the city of Tacloban on Leyte Island was directly in the path of the storm and was completely devas- tated by the intense winds and a storm surge between five and eight meters high. Many thousands lost their homes and were displaced. What was left was an apocalyptic landscape, testament to the awesome power of nature.

The Eye of the Storm

Hundreds of people, under a food-for-work program, clearing debris blocking the streets after Typhoon Haiyan.
Tacloban City, Philippines. November 26, 2013.
(© Sean Sutton / MAG / Panos Pictures)

The Eye of the Storm

Local people helping unload a helicopter, the first aid to reach the remote community after Typhoon Haiyan.
Mahagnau village, Leyte, Philippines, November 20, 2013.
(© Sean Sutton / MAG / Panos Pictures)

Maxim Dondyuk - Winner of the Ville de Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award 2014

Euromaidan: a Culture of Confrontation --- November 21, 2013. The announcement by the President of Ukraine that the Association Agreement between Ukraine and the European Union would not be signed was the starting point of Euromaidan, a completely peaceful protest by pro-EU Ukrainians. But a violent crackdown on protesters, plus provocation, brought massive crowds out, assembling on the main square of the capital, demanding respect for human rights, and calling for an end to the regime and the country's political elite. Euromaidan became a dramatic spectacle, with battle scenes reminiscent of the worst days of war, with frost and flames turning Maidan Nezalezhnosti - Independence Square - into a phantasmagoria, destroying the familiar features of the once carefree and bold city of Kiev.

Maxim Dondyuk - Winner of the Ville de Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award 2014

January 22, 2014.
Riot police leaving the area near Lobanovskyi Dynamo Stadium after the crackdown on protesters in central Kiev.
(© Maxim Dondyuk)
Winner of the Ville de Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award 2014

Maxim Dondyuk - Winner of the Ville de Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award 2014

February 19, 2014.
After the clashes, police and riot police remained on Maidan Nezalezhnosti.
(© Maxim Dondyuk)
Winner of the Ville de Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award 2014

Ukraine, from Independence Square to the Donbas

by Guillaume Herbaut / Institute --- It all started with a few tweets calling protestors to demonstrate on Independence Square. Students were angry that President Yanukovych had refused to sign an EU association agreement, opting instead for the Eurasian union proposed by Vladimir Putin. Then the corrupt president fled the country and it turned into revolution. Next Russia annexed Crimea, and since then Ukraine has been falling apart. So what is happening? Is this the emergence of a new nation? Is this a latter day manifestation of the Soviet era, or is it a revival of Russian imperialism on the global stage? The crisis in Ukraine may very well be the beginning of an international crisis.

Ukraine, from Independence Square to the Donbas

Kiev, Hrushevskoho Street, January 22, 2014, 2.16 pm.Standoff between pro-European activists and police.© Guillaume Herbaut / Institute
(© Guillaume Herbaut / Institute)

Ukraine, from Independence Square to the Donbas

Kiev, Khreshchatyk Avenue, December 9, 2013, 9.29 am.Two Cossacks on a barricade manned by pro-EU activists near Independence Square. (© Guillaume Herbaut / Institute)

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