Tour de France

Photos from the Tour de France

FILE PHOTO: Tour de France 2017 winner Chris Froome of Britain poses with the Golden bike trophy he received during the presentation of the itinerary of the 2018 Tour de France cycling race in Paris, France, October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
FILE PHOTO: Tour de France 2017 winner Chris Froome of Britain poses with the Golden bike trophy he received during the presentation of the itinerary of the 2018 Tour de France cycling race in Paris
FILE PHOTO: Tour de France 2017 winner Chris Froome of Britain poses with the Golden bike trophy he received during the presentation of the itinerary of the 2018 Tour de France cycling race in Paris, France, October 17, 2017. REUTERS/Charles Platiau
FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 14, 2016 file photo, actor Gerard Depardieu attends the premiere of the movie "Tour de France", in Paris. Actor Gerard Depardieu, singer Charles Aznavour and former President Nicolas Sarkozy are among some 300 prominent French people urging tougher national action against a “new anti-Semitism” that they blame on rising Islamic radicalism. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 14, 2016 file photo, actor Gerard Depardieu attends the premiere of the movie "Tour de France", in Paris. Actor Gerard Depardieu, singer Charles Aznavour and former President Nicolas Sarkozy are among some 300 prominent French people urging tougher national action against a “new anti-Semitism” that they blame on rising Islamic radicalism. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 14, 2016 file photo, actor Gerard Depardieu attends the premiere of the movie "Tour de France", in Paris. Actor Gerard Depardieu, singer Charles Aznavour and former President Nicolas Sarkozy are among some 300 prominent French people urging tougher national action against a “new anti-Semitism” that they blame on rising Islamic radicalism. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
<p>This 250 is shockingly original and comes with a whole bunch of racing history. </p>
A Tour de France Ferrari Race Car Is For Sale

This 250 is shockingly original and comes with a whole bunch of racing history.

<p>This 250 is shockingly original and comes with a whole bunch of racing history. </p>
A Tour de France Ferrari Race Car Is For Sale

This 250 is shockingly original and comes with a whole bunch of racing history.

Chris Froome salbutamol case expected to be resolved before Tour de France
Chris Froome salbutamol case expected to be resolved before Tour de France
Chris Froome salbutamol case expected to be resolved before Tour de France
Chris Froome salbutamol case expected to be resolved before Tour de France
Chris Froome salbutamol case expected to be resolved before Tour de France
Chris Froome salbutamol case expected to be resolved before Tour de France
Tour de France organiser Christian Prudhomme has ‘absolute confidence’ that the UCI will have made a ruling on Chris Froome’s salbutamol case before the race starts in July.
Chris Froome salbutamol case expected to be resolved before Tour de France
Tour de France organiser Christian Prudhomme has ‘absolute confidence’ that the UCI will have made a ruling on Chris Froome’s salbutamol case before the race starts in July.
Australia&#39;s Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017 (AFP Photo/GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT)
Australia's Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017
Australia's Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017 (AFP Photo/GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT)
Australia&#39;s Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017
Australia's Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017
Australia's Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017
Australia&#39;s Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017
Australia's Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017
Australia's Michael Matthews celebrates his green jersey of best sprinter on the podium at the end of the 103 km twenty-first and last stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 23, 2017
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion (AFP Photo/Joël SAGET)
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion (AFP Photo/Joël SAGET)
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion
Even as Lance Armstrong dominated the Tour de France, he rode under a cloud of suspicion
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France (AFP Photo/Joël SAGET)
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France
Lance Armstrong enjoyed his days in yellow on the Tour de France (AFP Photo/Joël SAGET)
Tainted cyclist Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle the federal fraud case. The case pertains to his drug-fuelled reign from 1999 to 2005 as the undisputed champion of Tour de France. Armstrong settled the dispute before the scheduled trial next month. The case is for allegedly defrauding the US Government by using banned substances while racing for Postal Service-sponsored team.
Lance Armstrong settles $100 million doping fraud case
Tainted cyclist Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle the federal fraud case. The case pertains to his drug-fuelled reign from 1999 to 2005 as the undisputed champion of Tour de France. Armstrong settled the dispute before the scheduled trial next month. The case is for allegedly defrauding the US Government by using banned substances while racing for Postal Service-sponsored team.
<p>Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.</p>
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case

Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.

<p>Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.</p>
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case

Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.

<p>Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.</p>
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case

Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.

Disgraced ex-cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a federal suit claiming he defrauded his sponsor, the US Postal Service, by using performance-enhancing drugs. The settlement - worth 4 million euros - ends the long-running case brought by fellow cyclist Floyd Landis and joined by the US government. They had been seeking 20 times that amount, with a trial due to start on May 7. &quot;No one is above the law,&quot; Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department&#39;s Civil Division Chad Readler said in a statement. &quot;This settlement demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable.&quot; Armstrong, 46, won professional cycling&#39;s biggest race, the Tour de France, a record seven times, six of them while riding for the Postal Service team. But he was stripped of his titles and banned for life from the sport in 2012, as doping allegations mounted. The following year, Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating, in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. &quot;I&#39;m looking forward to devoting myself to the many great things in my life -- my five kids, my wife, my podcast, several exciting writing and film projects, my work as a cancer survivor, and my passion for sports and competition,&quot; Armstrong said in a statement. with Reuters
Ex-cycling star Armstrong settles $100m doping fraud lawsuit
Disgraced ex-cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a federal suit claiming he defrauded his sponsor, the US Postal Service, by using performance-enhancing drugs. The settlement - worth 4 million euros - ends the long-running case brought by fellow cyclist Floyd Landis and joined by the US government. They had been seeking 20 times that amount, with a trial due to start on May 7. "No one is above the law," Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Civil Division Chad Readler said in a statement. "This settlement demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable." Armstrong, 46, won professional cycling's biggest race, the Tour de France, a record seven times, six of them while riding for the Postal Service team. But he was stripped of his titles and banned for life from the sport in 2012, as doping allegations mounted. The following year, Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating, in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. "I'm looking forward to devoting myself to the many great things in my life -- my five kids, my wife, my podcast, several exciting writing and film projects, my work as a cancer survivor, and my passion for sports and competition," Armstrong said in a statement. with Reuters
Disgraced ex-cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a federal suit claiming he defrauded his sponsor, the US Postal Service, by using performance-enhancing drugs. The settlement - worth 4 million euros - ends the long-running case brought by fellow cyclist Floyd Landis and joined by the US government. They had been seeking 20 times that amount, with a trial due to start on May 7. &quot;No one is above the law,&quot; Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department&#39;s Civil Division Chad Readler said in a statement. &quot;This settlement demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable.&quot; Armstrong, 46, won professional cycling&#39;s biggest race, the Tour de France, a record seven times, six of them while riding for the Postal Service team. But he was stripped of his titles and banned for life from the sport in 2012, as doping allegations mounted. The following year, Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating, in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. &quot;I&#39;m looking forward to devoting myself to the many great things in my life -- my five kids, my wife, my podcast, several exciting writing and film projects, my work as a cancer survivor, and my passion for sports and competition,&quot; Armstrong said in a statement. with Reuters
Ex-cycling star Armstrong settles $100m doping fraud lawsuit
Disgraced ex-cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a federal suit claiming he defrauded his sponsor, the US Postal Service, by using performance-enhancing drugs. The settlement - worth 4 million euros - ends the long-running case brought by fellow cyclist Floyd Landis and joined by the US government. They had been seeking 20 times that amount, with a trial due to start on May 7. "No one is above the law," Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Civil Division Chad Readler said in a statement. "This settlement demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable." Armstrong, 46, won professional cycling's biggest race, the Tour de France, a record seven times, six of them while riding for the Postal Service team. But he was stripped of his titles and banned for life from the sport in 2012, as doping allegations mounted. The following year, Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating, in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. "I'm looking forward to devoting myself to the many great things in my life -- my five kids, my wife, my podcast, several exciting writing and film projects, my work as a cancer survivor, and my passion for sports and competition," Armstrong said in a statement. with Reuters
Disgraced ex-cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a federal suit claiming he defrauded his sponsor, the US Postal Service, by using performance-enhancing drugs. The settlement - worth 4 million euros - ends the long-running case brought by fellow cyclist Floyd Landis and joined by the US government. They had been seeking 20 times that amount, with a trial due to start on May 7. &quot;No one is above the law,&quot; Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department&#39;s Civil Division Chad Readler said in a statement. &quot;This settlement demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable.&quot; Armstrong, 46, won professional cycling&#39;s biggest race, the Tour de France, a record seven times, six of them while riding for the Postal Service team. But he was stripped of his titles and banned for life from the sport in 2012, as doping allegations mounted. The following year, Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating, in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. &quot;I&#39;m looking forward to devoting myself to the many great things in my life -- my five kids, my wife, my podcast, several exciting writing and film projects, my work as a cancer survivor, and my passion for sports and competition,&quot; Armstrong said in a statement. with Reuters
Ex-cycling star Armstrong settles $100m doping fraud lawsuit
Disgraced ex-cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a federal suit claiming he defrauded his sponsor, the US Postal Service, by using performance-enhancing drugs. The settlement - worth 4 million euros - ends the long-running case brought by fellow cyclist Floyd Landis and joined by the US government. They had been seeking 20 times that amount, with a trial due to start on May 7. "No one is above the law," Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Civil Division Chad Readler said in a statement. "This settlement demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable." Armstrong, 46, won professional cycling's biggest race, the Tour de France, a record seven times, six of them while riding for the Postal Service team. But he was stripped of his titles and banned for life from the sport in 2012, as doping allegations mounted. The following year, Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating, in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. "I'm looking forward to devoting myself to the many great things in my life -- my five kids, my wife, my podcast, several exciting writing and film projects, my work as a cancer survivor, and my passion for sports and competition," Armstrong said in a statement. with Reuters
Disgraced ex-cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a federal suit claiming he defrauded his sponsor, the US Postal Service, by using performance-enhancing drugs. The settlement - worth 4 million euros - ends the long-running case brought by fellow cyclist Floyd Landis and joined by the US government. They had been seeking 20 times that amount, with a trial due to start on May 7. "No one is above the law," Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Civil Division Chad Readler said in a statement. "This settlement demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable." Armstrong, 46, won professional cycling's biggest race, the Tour de France, a record seven times, six of them while riding for the Postal Service team. But he was stripped of his titles and banned for life from the sport in 2012, as doping allegations mounted. The following year, Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating, in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. "I'm looking forward to devoting myself to the many great things in my life -- my five kids, my wife, my podcast, several exciting writing and film projects, my work as a cancer survivor, and my passion for sports and competition," Armstrong said in a statement. with Reuters
Ex-cycling star Armstrong settles $100m doping fraud lawsuit
Disgraced ex-cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million to settle a federal suit claiming he defrauded his sponsor, the US Postal Service, by using performance-enhancing drugs. The settlement - worth 4 million euros - ends the long-running case brought by fellow cyclist Floyd Landis and joined by the US government. They had been seeking 20 times that amount, with a trial due to start on May 7. "No one is above the law," Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Civil Division Chad Readler said in a statement. "This settlement demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable." Armstrong, 46, won professional cycling's biggest race, the Tour de France, a record seven times, six of them while riding for the Postal Service team. But he was stripped of his titles and banned for life from the sport in 2012, as doping allegations mounted. The following year, Armstrong publicly confessed to cheating, in a TV interview with Oprah Winfrey. "I'm looking forward to devoting myself to the many great things in my life -- my five kids, my wife, my podcast, several exciting writing and film projects, my work as a cancer survivor, and my passion for sports and competition," Armstrong said in a statement. with Reuters
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Armstrong in $5m settlement for US fraud case
Lance Armstrong agrees to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France.
Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million in order to settle his looming federal fraud case stemming from his use of performance-enhancing drugs during the Tour de France, his lawyers confirmed Thursday
Lance Armstrong to Pay $5m Settlement in US Fraud Case: Lawyer
Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million in order to settle his looming federal fraud case stemming from his use of performance-enhancing drugs during the Tour de France, his lawyers confirmed Thursday
Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France, it was confirmed on Thursday.
Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong reaches $5 million settlement with US government over doping
Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay $5 million in order to settle the looming federal fraud case stemming from his drug-fuelled reign as king of the Tour de France, it was confirmed on Thursday.
Lance Armstrong has reached a $5 million settlement with the federal government in a whistleblower lawsuit that could have sought $100 million in damages from the cyclist who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France victories after admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his career. According to a 2011 "60 Minutes" investigation, Armstrong's former teammates saw him injecting himself with banned substances, including the blood doping agent EPO.
Lance Armstrong to pay $5M settlement for defrauding U.S. government
Lance Armstrong has reached a $5 million settlement with the federal government in a whistleblower lawsuit that could have sought $100 million in damages from the cyclist who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France victories after admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his career. According to a 2011 "60 Minutes" investigation, Armstrong's former teammates saw him injecting himself with banned substances, including the blood doping agent EPO.
Lance Armstrong has reached a $5 million settlement with the federal government in a whistleblower lawsuit that could have sought $100 million in damages from the cyclist who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France victories after admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his career. According to a 2011 &quot;60 Minutes&quot; investigation, Armstrong&#39;s former teammates saw him injecting himself with banned substances, including the blood doping agent EPO.
Lance Armstrong to pay $5M settlement for defrauding U.S. government
Lance Armstrong has reached a $5 million settlement with the federal government in a whistleblower lawsuit that could have sought $100 million in damages from the cyclist who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France victories after admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his career. According to a 2011 "60 Minutes" investigation, Armstrong's former teammates saw him injecting himself with banned substances, including the blood doping agent EPO.
Lance Armstrong has reached a $5 million settlement with the federal government in a whistleblower lawsuit that could have sought $100 million in damages from the cyclist who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France victories after admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his career. According to a 2011 &quot;60 Minutes&quot; investigation, Armstrong&#39;s former teammates saw him injecting himself with banned substances, including the blood doping agent EPO.
Lance Armstrong to pay $5M settlement for defrauding U.S. government
Lance Armstrong has reached a $5 million settlement with the federal government in a whistleblower lawsuit that could have sought $100 million in damages from the cyclist who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France victories after admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his career. According to a 2011 "60 Minutes" investigation, Armstrong's former teammates saw him injecting himself with banned substances, including the blood doping agent EPO.
Lance Armstrong has reached a $5 million settlement with the federal government in a whistleblower lawsuit that could have sought $100 million in damages from the cyclist who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France victories after admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his career. According to a 2011 &quot;60 Minutes&quot; investigation, Armstrong&#39;s former teammates saw him injecting himself with banned substances, including the blood doping agent EPO.
Lance Armstrong to pay $5M settlement for defrauding U.S. government
Lance Armstrong has reached a $5 million settlement with the federal government in a whistleblower lawsuit that could have sought $100 million in damages from the cyclist who was stripped of his record seven Tour de France victories after admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his career. According to a 2011 "60 Minutes" investigation, Armstrong's former teammates saw him injecting himself with banned substances, including the blood doping agent EPO.
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Postal Service Team rider Lance Armstrong of the United States raises his arms as he crosses the finish line to win the 204.5 km long 17th stage of the Tour de France from Bourd-d&#39;Oisans to Le Grand Bornand, France, July 22, 2004. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Postal Service Team rider Lance Armstrong of the United States raises his arms as he crosses the finish line in Le Grand Bornand
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Postal Service Team rider Lance Armstrong of the United States raises his arms as he crosses the finish line to win the 204.5 km long 17th stage of the Tour de France from Bourd-d'Oisans to Le Grand Bornand, France, July 22, 2004. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Postal Service team leader Lance Armstrong (R) of the USA looks at a French gendarme before boarding the plane which takes the riders from Grenoble to Perpignan for the transfer stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Grenoble, France, July 19, 2001. REUTERS/Pool/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: US Postal Service team leader Lance Armstrong of the USA looking at a French gendarme before boarding for the transfer stage of the Tour de France cycling race
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Postal Service team leader Lance Armstrong (R) of the USA looks at a French gendarme before boarding the plane which takes the riders from Grenoble to Perpignan for the transfer stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Grenoble, France, July 19, 2001. REUTERS/Pool/File Photo

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