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Astros pitching coach, Brent Strom, back in Tucson to share the experience of the World Series with youth baseball students. The former Tucson Toro shared insight from the Fall Classic.
Brent Strom returns to Tucson
Astros pitching coach, Brent Strom, back in Tucson to share the experience of the World Series with youth baseball students. The former Tucson Toro shared insight from the Fall Classic.
Astros pitching coach, Brent Strom, back in Tucson to share the experience of the World Series with youth baseball students. The former Tucson Toro shared insight from the Fall Classic.
Brent Strom returns to Tucson
Astros pitching coach, Brent Strom, back in Tucson to share the experience of the World Series with youth baseball students. The former Tucson Toro shared insight from the Fall Classic.
Astros pitching coach, Brent Strom, back in Tucson to share the experience of the World Series with youth baseball students. The former Tucson Toro shared insight from the Fall Classic.
Brent Strom returns to Tucson
Astros pitching coach, Brent Strom, back in Tucson to share the experience of the World Series with youth baseball students. The former Tucson Toro shared insight from the Fall Classic.
Astros pitching coach, Brent Strom, back in Tucson to share the experience of the World Series with youth baseball students. The former Tucson Toro shared insight from the Fall Classic.
Brent Strom returns to Tucson
Astros pitching coach, Brent Strom, back in Tucson to share the experience of the World Series with youth baseball students. The former Tucson Toro shared insight from the Fall Classic.
New York Yankees starting pitcher CC Sabathia throws during the first inning of Game 7 of baseball's American League Championship Series against the Houston Astros Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017, in Houston. (AP Photo/Eric Christian Smith)
Reports: C.C. Sabathia agrees to 1-year deal with Yankees
New York Yankees starting pitcher CC Sabathia throws during the first inning of Game 7 of baseball's American League Championship Series against the Houston Astros Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017, in Houston. (AP Photo/Eric Christian Smith)
The Presidential character mascots of the Washington Nationals baseball team, from left, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln take pictures with children during the Winter Fest celebration with fans at Washington Convention Center in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
The Presidential character mascots of the Washington Nationals baseball team, from left, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln take pictures with children during the Winter Fest celebration with fans at Washington Convention Center in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
The Presidential character mascots of the Washington Nationals baseball team, from left, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln take pictures with children during the Winter Fest celebration with fans at Washington Convention Center in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Washington Nationals Manager Dave Martinez sign autographs on a baseball to children during the Winter Fest celebration with fans at Washington Convention Center in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Washington Nationals Manager Dave Martinez sign autographs on a baseball to children during the Winter Fest celebration with fans at Washington Convention Center in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Washington Nationals Manager Dave Martinez sign autographs on a baseball to children during the Winter Fest celebration with fans at Washington Convention Center in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
FILE - In this June 24, 2017, file photo, Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp waves to a fan after the team's baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/Danny Karnik, File)
Kemp back in LA, Gonzalez out in 5-player deal with Braves
FILE - In this June 24, 2017, file photo, Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp waves to a fan after the team's baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/Danny Karnik, File)
Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp watches the flight of a two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies on Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Kemp back in LA, Gonzalez out in 5-player deal with Braves
Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp watches the flight of a two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies on Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp watches the flight of a two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies on Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp watches the flight of a two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies on Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp watches the flight of a two-run home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies on Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
FILE - In this June 24, 2017, file photo, Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp waves to a fan after the team's baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/Danny Karnik, File)
FILE - In this June 24, 2017, file photo, Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp waves to a fan after the team's baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/Danny Karnik, File)
FILE - In this June 24, 2017, file photo, Atlanta Braves' Matt Kemp waves to a fan after the team's baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers in Atlanta. Kemp is returning to the Los Angeles Dodgers as part of a five-player trade with the Atlanta Braves that includes cash. (AP Photo/Danny Karnik, File)
Washington Nationals second baseman Daniel Murphy sits in the dugout in the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Sunday, July 16, 2017, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Nats 2B Murphy using crutches 8 weeks after knee surgery
Washington Nationals second baseman Daniel Murphy sits in the dugout in the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Sunday, July 16, 2017, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
<p>After weeks of inaction, the Dodgers have finally made a blockbuster trade—albeit one that will have virtually no effect on their 2018 team or World Series chances. <a href="https://twitter.com/Ken_Rosenthal/status/942116470875676672" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:As first reported by The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">As first reported by The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal</a>, Los Angeles is sending first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, starters Brandon McCarthy and Scott Kazmir and infielder Charlie Culberson to the Braves for outfielder Matt Kemp. If you’re looking at that collection of names and wondering if you’ve somehow stumbled into 2011, you’re not alone. But the key to understanding this swap isn’t the talent being moved around, but the money changing hands—or, in the case of the Dodgers, being saved.</p><p>Not one of those five players will make any real difference to either Los Angeles or Atlanta next year. Kemp is the biggest name changing residences (and, in this case, going back to the team that drafted him 14 years ago), but he was a sub-replacement level player last year thanks to his brutal defense in leftfield and league-average bat; his -1.3 WAR was eighth-worst among all players in the game. Not that Gonzalez, Kazmir or McCarthy were any better: All were sidelined for long stretches with injuries, with Kazmir never even getting onto the mound in the majors. Gonzalez managed just 71 games thanks to back woes, lost his starting job to Rookie of the Year Cody Bellinger and hit only .242/.287/.355. McCarthy, who more or less lives on the disabled list, tossed just 92 2/3 innings last season—his third straight year under 100. In all honesty, the most impactful player in this deal might be Culberson, a no-hit/all-glove infielder who had an OPS+ of 34 (!) in part-time duty last year but improbably crushed the ball in the postseason in place of an injured Corey Seager, slashing .500/.471/.938 in 18 plate appearances.</p><p>This deal isn’t about the players, and neither team is even pretending that’s the case; the Braves <a href="https://twitter.com/Joelsherman1/status/942121297542369280" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:will waive Gonzalez on Monday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">will waive Gonzalez on Monday</a>, making him a free agent, and the Dodgers are <a href="https://twitter.com/JonHeyman/status/942129145366155270" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:already reportedly looking to flip or release Kemp" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">already reportedly looking to flip or release Kemp</a>, who has no spot in a crowded outfield. Instead, this is one gigantic salary dump on both sides. Gonzalez, Kazmir and McCarthy are all entering the last years of their contracts and will make a combined $51.6 million in 2018. Kemp, meanwhile, still has another two years and $43.5 million left on his current deal. Los Angeles rids itself of three high-priced veterans who were unlikely to contribute to next year’s team while Atlanta dumps one of its biggest contracts in an expiring contracts trade that would make the NBA proud. The Braves also open up an outfield spot for top prospect Ronald Acuña and can flip McCarthy or Kazmir at the deadline for prospects should either or both get and stay healthy and productive.</p><p>But the biggest outcome of this deal is a dream scenario for Los Angeles. By trading Gonzalez, Kazmir and McCarthy and adding on Kemp, the Dodgers are now projected to have a payroll of roughly $185 million next year—$12 million under the luxury tax threshold of $197 million. If they can avoid surpassing that number, not only will they avoid a tax—a percentage of every dollar above that figure—but they’ll also no longer be repeat violators of it. Teams that surpass the threshold in consecutive years are subject to larger and larger penalties every season they go over, maxing out at 50% on the dollar at three years and up. By getting under $197 million, the Dodgers can re-set the penalty, creating a potentially gigantic windfall of cash going forward.</p><p>In essence, for the Dodgers, this is a trade for next winter, when the massive free-agent class of Bryce Harper, Manny Machado, Josh Donaldson, and Charlie Blackmon (and potentially Clayton Kershaw, if he opts out of his contract) will all hit the market at once. The money saved by getting under the luxury tax will theoretically be used to splurge next year. The rich, as they say, are getting richer. (And note that the Dodgers aren’t alone in doing this; the Yankees, despite adding Giancarlo Stanton, are also currently under the luxury tax, freeing them up to spend big in 2018 as well.)</p><p>This is a terrifying prospect for the rest of the league, with the great majority of teams already completely unable to match the Dodgers and Yankees (as well as a few others) dollar for dollar for top-flight free agents and even less able to do so if both teams suddenly come into some extra cash. But even though a good chunk of those spare millions will be thrown at Harper, Machado and the like, it’s also a worrisome development for the players, who have already seen the free-agent market grow cold this year as teams get more and more frugal. That $197 million luxury tax limit is essentially a soft salary cap, and one that seems to be growing harder. It’s not just the Yankees and the Dodgers steering clear of spending this winter. Other squads that are up against the cap—the Giants, Red Sox, and Nationals, to name a few—are leery of the financial hit that the overage tax will deliver.</p><p>All of that is bad news for the players, especially mid-tier free agents. Guys like Harper and Machado will get paid no matter what financial constraints exist; elite talent always will. It’s the players further down the food chain who will suffer, as teams decide to save their money and squeeze those on the market. You’re already seeing that this year: Aside from middle relievers, there’s been no movement for free agents, as teams seem content to wait the players out until they get desperate to sign whatever deal is on the table. And with the big spenders sitting free agency out for financial reasons, the players have no leverage.</p><p>It was easy to see this coming <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2016/12/01/mlb-avoids-lockout-new-cba-deal" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:when the latest collective bargaining agreement was signed last December" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">when the latest collective bargaining agreement was signed last December</a>, as the luxury tax limit barely edged up year by year despite the league’s exploding revenues—$10 billion <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2017/11/22/mlb-revenues-exceed-10-billion/890041001/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:this year alone" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">this year alone</a>. Ever since the advent of free agency, which MLB owners fought against tooth and nail for decades, front office executives have decried the rise in player salaries; with MLB as the only major North American sports league without a salary cap, there’s theoretically no limit on what players could make. The owners have tried everything to slow this down—arbitration, service time barriers, even collusion—and created the conditions for the devastating strike in 1994 by demanding a salary cap, which the players’ union refused. All of this was done in the name of parity, of keeping the big spenders from leaving the small-market teams in the dust; that was the rationale behind the luxury tax, introduced in 2002.</p><p>But as the numbers and limits get updated with each new CBA, it becomes clearer and clearer that the luxury tax isn’t about creating equal footing; it’s purely about player control and team profit. It’s the owners’ tool to depress salaries, and what’s especially frustrating is that, in the last two CBA negotiations, the MLB Players Association under Tony Clark has barely fought back against this (or, at least, seemed to get nothing substantial in return for their agreement). Clark and the MLBPA would likely argue that, as we’ll see with all the action next winter, the system is working just fine; players will still get paid, and Harper’s contract in particular should set a record for biggest free-agent deal in league history. But that doesn’t take into account all the players sitting around still waiting to sign contracts this winter, and it doesn’t consider trades like Saturday’s. That isn’t new; salary dumps have been happening for a long time in baseball. But the scale and result of this one, made not for baseball but for financial reasons, feels like a new and disquieting beast entirely.</p><p>Call this good business or savvy work on the owners’ part if you want. But why root for billionaires to save money? The overall product of Major League Baseball is weakened when teams refuse to spend or make moves solely to avoid financial penalties or turn a bigger profit. Baseball is already amid a wave of teams tanking as a rebuild strategy, racing to the bottom both in terms of wins and payroll. And now teams at the top are embracing a variant of the same strategy, doing whatever they can to scrimp when they can easily afford to blow by whatever luxury tax limit exists. The Dodgers and Yankees will spend next year, and the union will argue that a rising tide lifts all boats. But they could have spent whenever they wanted. Instead, they’ll continue to pinch their pennies and leave the players out in the cold in a league that, as this trade shows, has put a heavy emphasis on counting its coins.</p>
Dodgers' Mega Trade Is More About 2018 Offseason Than Reacquiring Matt Kemp

After weeks of inaction, the Dodgers have finally made a blockbuster trade—albeit one that will have virtually no effect on their 2018 team or World Series chances. As first reported by The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal, Los Angeles is sending first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, starters Brandon McCarthy and Scott Kazmir and infielder Charlie Culberson to the Braves for outfielder Matt Kemp. If you’re looking at that collection of names and wondering if you’ve somehow stumbled into 2011, you’re not alone. But the key to understanding this swap isn’t the talent being moved around, but the money changing hands—or, in the case of the Dodgers, being saved.

Not one of those five players will make any real difference to either Los Angeles or Atlanta next year. Kemp is the biggest name changing residences (and, in this case, going back to the team that drafted him 14 years ago), but he was a sub-replacement level player last year thanks to his brutal defense in leftfield and league-average bat; his -1.3 WAR was eighth-worst among all players in the game. Not that Gonzalez, Kazmir or McCarthy were any better: All were sidelined for long stretches with injuries, with Kazmir never even getting onto the mound in the majors. Gonzalez managed just 71 games thanks to back woes, lost his starting job to Rookie of the Year Cody Bellinger and hit only .242/.287/.355. McCarthy, who more or less lives on the disabled list, tossed just 92 2/3 innings last season—his third straight year under 100. In all honesty, the most impactful player in this deal might be Culberson, a no-hit/all-glove infielder who had an OPS+ of 34 (!) in part-time duty last year but improbably crushed the ball in the postseason in place of an injured Corey Seager, slashing .500/.471/.938 in 18 plate appearances.

This deal isn’t about the players, and neither team is even pretending that’s the case; the Braves will waive Gonzalez on Monday, making him a free agent, and the Dodgers are already reportedly looking to flip or release Kemp, who has no spot in a crowded outfield. Instead, this is one gigantic salary dump on both sides. Gonzalez, Kazmir and McCarthy are all entering the last years of their contracts and will make a combined $51.6 million in 2018. Kemp, meanwhile, still has another two years and $43.5 million left on his current deal. Los Angeles rids itself of three high-priced veterans who were unlikely to contribute to next year’s team while Atlanta dumps one of its biggest contracts in an expiring contracts trade that would make the NBA proud. The Braves also open up an outfield spot for top prospect Ronald Acuña and can flip McCarthy or Kazmir at the deadline for prospects should either or both get and stay healthy and productive.

But the biggest outcome of this deal is a dream scenario for Los Angeles. By trading Gonzalez, Kazmir and McCarthy and adding on Kemp, the Dodgers are now projected to have a payroll of roughly $185 million next year—$12 million under the luxury tax threshold of $197 million. If they can avoid surpassing that number, not only will they avoid a tax—a percentage of every dollar above that figure—but they’ll also no longer be repeat violators of it. Teams that surpass the threshold in consecutive years are subject to larger and larger penalties every season they go over, maxing out at 50% on the dollar at three years and up. By getting under $197 million, the Dodgers can re-set the penalty, creating a potentially gigantic windfall of cash going forward.

In essence, for the Dodgers, this is a trade for next winter, when the massive free-agent class of Bryce Harper, Manny Machado, Josh Donaldson, and Charlie Blackmon (and potentially Clayton Kershaw, if he opts out of his contract) will all hit the market at once. The money saved by getting under the luxury tax will theoretically be used to splurge next year. The rich, as they say, are getting richer. (And note that the Dodgers aren’t alone in doing this; the Yankees, despite adding Giancarlo Stanton, are also currently under the luxury tax, freeing them up to spend big in 2018 as well.)

This is a terrifying prospect for the rest of the league, with the great majority of teams already completely unable to match the Dodgers and Yankees (as well as a few others) dollar for dollar for top-flight free agents and even less able to do so if both teams suddenly come into some extra cash. But even though a good chunk of those spare millions will be thrown at Harper, Machado and the like, it’s also a worrisome development for the players, who have already seen the free-agent market grow cold this year as teams get more and more frugal. That $197 million luxury tax limit is essentially a soft salary cap, and one that seems to be growing harder. It’s not just the Yankees and the Dodgers steering clear of spending this winter. Other squads that are up against the cap—the Giants, Red Sox, and Nationals, to name a few—are leery of the financial hit that the overage tax will deliver.

All of that is bad news for the players, especially mid-tier free agents. Guys like Harper and Machado will get paid no matter what financial constraints exist; elite talent always will. It’s the players further down the food chain who will suffer, as teams decide to save their money and squeeze those on the market. You’re already seeing that this year: Aside from middle relievers, there’s been no movement for free agents, as teams seem content to wait the players out until they get desperate to sign whatever deal is on the table. And with the big spenders sitting free agency out for financial reasons, the players have no leverage.

It was easy to see this coming when the latest collective bargaining agreement was signed last December, as the luxury tax limit barely edged up year by year despite the league’s exploding revenues—$10 billion this year alone. Ever since the advent of free agency, which MLB owners fought against tooth and nail for decades, front office executives have decried the rise in player salaries; with MLB as the only major North American sports league without a salary cap, there’s theoretically no limit on what players could make. The owners have tried everything to slow this down—arbitration, service time barriers, even collusion—and created the conditions for the devastating strike in 1994 by demanding a salary cap, which the players’ union refused. All of this was done in the name of parity, of keeping the big spenders from leaving the small-market teams in the dust; that was the rationale behind the luxury tax, introduced in 2002.

But as the numbers and limits get updated with each new CBA, it becomes clearer and clearer that the luxury tax isn’t about creating equal footing; it’s purely about player control and team profit. It’s the owners’ tool to depress salaries, and what’s especially frustrating is that, in the last two CBA negotiations, the MLB Players Association under Tony Clark has barely fought back against this (or, at least, seemed to get nothing substantial in return for their agreement). Clark and the MLBPA would likely argue that, as we’ll see with all the action next winter, the system is working just fine; players will still get paid, and Harper’s contract in particular should set a record for biggest free-agent deal in league history. But that doesn’t take into account all the players sitting around still waiting to sign contracts this winter, and it doesn’t consider trades like Saturday’s. That isn’t new; salary dumps have been happening for a long time in baseball. But the scale and result of this one, made not for baseball but for financial reasons, feels like a new and disquieting beast entirely.

Call this good business or savvy work on the owners’ part if you want. But why root for billionaires to save money? The overall product of Major League Baseball is weakened when teams refuse to spend or make moves solely to avoid financial penalties or turn a bigger profit. Baseball is already amid a wave of teams tanking as a rebuild strategy, racing to the bottom both in terms of wins and payroll. And now teams at the top are embracing a variant of the same strategy, doing whatever they can to scrimp when they can easily afford to blow by whatever luxury tax limit exists. The Dodgers and Yankees will spend next year, and the union will argue that a rising tide lifts all boats. But they could have spent whenever they wanted. Instead, they’ll continue to pinch their pennies and leave the players out in the cold in a league that, as this trade shows, has put a heavy emphasis on counting its coins.

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2017, file photo, Boston Red Sox new manager Alex Cora poses in Fenway Park following an introductory news conference in Boston. The Boston Red Sox held a Christmas carnival at Fenway Park on Saturday, Dec. 16, for fans who like their favorite team still have some shopping to do. Cora said he wasn&#39;t worried about his bosses filling the gap in the lineup. There&#39;s no deadline in the offseason,&quot; Cora said. &quot;When we get to Feb. 16, we&#39;re going to have a good baseball team.&quot; (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
Holiday shopping at Fenway Park, for fans and team alike
FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2017, file photo, Boston Red Sox new manager Alex Cora poses in Fenway Park following an introductory news conference in Boston. The Boston Red Sox held a Christmas carnival at Fenway Park on Saturday, Dec. 16, for fans who like their favorite team still have some shopping to do. Cora said he wasn't worried about his bosses filling the gap in the lineup. There's no deadline in the offseason," Cora said. "When we get to Feb. 16, we're going to have a good baseball team." (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2017, file photo, Boston Red Sox new manager Alex Cora poses in Fenway Park following an introductory news conference in Boston. The Boston Red Sox held a Christmas carnival at Fenway Park on Saturday, Dec. 16, for fans who — like their favorite team — still have some shopping to do. Cora said he wasn&#39;t worried about his bosses filling the gap in the lineup. There&#39;s no deadline in the offseason,&quot; Cora said. &quot;When we get to Feb. 16, we&#39;re going to have a good baseball team.&quot; (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2017, file photo, Boston Red Sox new manager Alex Cora poses in Fenway Park following an introductory news conference in Boston. The Boston Red Sox held a Christmas carnival at Fenway Park on Saturday, Dec. 16, for fans who — like their favorite team — still have some shopping to do. Cora said he wasn't worried about his bosses filling the gap in the lineup. There's no deadline in the offseason," Cora said. "When we get to Feb. 16, we're going to have a good baseball team." (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2017, file photo, Boston Red Sox new manager Alex Cora poses in Fenway Park following an introductory news conference in Boston. The Boston Red Sox held a Christmas carnival at Fenway Park on Saturday, Dec. 16, for fans who — like their favorite team — still have some shopping to do. Cora said he wasn't worried about his bosses filling the gap in the lineup. There's no deadline in the offseason," Cora said. "When we get to Feb. 16, we're going to have a good baseball team." (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
Atlanta Braves left fielder Matt Kemp catches a line drive by Washington Nationals&#39; Brian Goodwin during the third inning of a baseball game, Thursday, July 6, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
Kemp back in LA, Gonzalez out in 5-player deal with Braves
Atlanta Braves left fielder Matt Kemp catches a line drive by Washington Nationals' Brian Goodwin during the third inning of a baseball game, Thursday, July 6, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2017, file photo, Derek Jeter, chief executive officer and part owner of the Miami Marlins, talks with members of the media at the annual baseball general managers&#39; meetings, in Orlando, Fla. Jeter, The Player, glided through two decades in the Big Apple. Suave, sophisticated and charming, he made it all look so effortless, a beloved figure who could seemingly do no wrong, even in the media cauldron that is New York City. Which makes Derek Jeter, The Baseball Executive, all the more baffling.(AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
Column: Smooth on the field, Jeter struggles in front office
FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2017, file photo, Derek Jeter, chief executive officer and part owner of the Miami Marlins, talks with members of the media at the annual baseball general managers' meetings, in Orlando, Fla. Jeter, The Player, glided through two decades in the Big Apple. Suave, sophisticated and charming, he made it all look so effortless, a beloved figure who could seemingly do no wrong, even in the media cauldron that is New York City. Which makes Derek Jeter, The Baseball Executive, all the more baffling.(AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 11, 2017, file photo, New Yankees player Giancarlo Stanton answers questions during a press conference at the Major League Baseball winter meetings in Orlando, Fla. Derek Jeter, The Player, glided through two decades in the Big Apple. His charisma made it all look so effortless, a beloved figure who could seemingly do no wrong, even in the media cauldron that is New York City. Which makes Derek Jeter, The Baseball Executive, all the more baffling. Frankly, he had no real options beyond dumping MVP slugger Giancarlo Stanton and the worst contract in sports history on his former team. (AP Photo/Willie J. Allen Jr., File)
Column: Smooth on the field, Jeter struggles in front office
FILE - In this Dec. 11, 2017, file photo, New Yankees player Giancarlo Stanton answers questions during a press conference at the Major League Baseball winter meetings in Orlando, Fla. Derek Jeter, The Player, glided through two decades in the Big Apple. His charisma made it all look so effortless, a beloved figure who could seemingly do no wrong, even in the media cauldron that is New York City. Which makes Derek Jeter, The Baseball Executive, all the more baffling. Frankly, he had no real options beyond dumping MVP slugger Giancarlo Stanton and the worst contract in sports history on his former team. (AP Photo/Willie J. Allen Jr., File)
FILE - In this Sept. 30, 2017, file photo, New York Yankees&#39; Aaron Judge rounds the bases with a home run during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Toronto Blue Jays in New York. Aaron Judge cant wait to get to spring training and start learning from new teammate Giancarlo Stanton. The reigning AL Rookie of the Year alongside the NL MVP. What a sluggin 1-2 punch in the middle of the New York Yankees lineup not to mention daily entertainment during batting practice.(AP Photo/Bill Kostroun, File)
Column: Smooth on the field, Jeter struggles in front office
FILE - In this Sept. 30, 2017, file photo, New York Yankees' Aaron Judge rounds the bases with a home run during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Toronto Blue Jays in New York. Aaron Judge cant wait to get to spring training and start learning from new teammate Giancarlo Stanton. The reigning AL Rookie of the Year alongside the NL MVP. What a sluggin 1-2 punch in the middle of the New York Yankees lineup not to mention daily entertainment during batting practice.(AP Photo/Bill Kostroun, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2017, file photo, Miami Marlins&#39; Marcell Ozuna watches his RBI triple during the first inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, in Atlanta. A person familiar with the negotiations says Miami has agreed to trade left fielder Marcell Ozuna to the St. Louis Cardinals, the third All-Star jettisoned by the Marlins this month in an unrelenting payroll purge under new CEO Derek Jeter. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Wednesday because the agreement had not been announced and was subject to a physical. (AP Photo/Brett Davis, File)
Column: Smooth on the field, Jeter struggles in front office
FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2017, file photo, Miami Marlins' Marcell Ozuna watches his RBI triple during the first inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, in Atlanta. A person familiar with the negotiations says Miami has agreed to trade left fielder Marcell Ozuna to the St. Louis Cardinals, the third All-Star jettisoned by the Marlins this month in an unrelenting payroll purge under new CEO Derek Jeter. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Wednesday because the agreement had not been announced and was subject to a physical. (AP Photo/Brett Davis, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore throws to an Arizona Diamondbacks batter during the first inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. A person with direct knowledge of the agreement says the San Francisco Giants are trading left-hander Matt Moore to the Texas Rangers for prospects. The swap was pending a physical, the person said Friday, Dec. 15, 2017 speaking on condition of anonymity because neither club had announced the deal. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
Matt Moore dealt from Giants to Rangers for minor leaguers
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore throws to an Arizona Diamondbacks batter during the first inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. A person with direct knowledge of the agreement says the San Francisco Giants are trading left-hander Matt Moore to the Texas Rangers for prospects. The swap was pending a physical, the person said Friday, Dec. 15, 2017 speaking on condition of anonymity because neither club had announced the deal. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore throws to an Arizona Diamondbacks batter during the first inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. A person with direct knowledge of the agreement says the San Francisco Giants are trading left-hander Matt Moore to the Texas Rangers for prospects. The swap was pending a physical, the person said Friday, Dec. 15, 2017 speaking on condition of anonymity because neither club had announced the deal. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore throws to an Arizona Diamondbacks batter during the first inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. A person with direct knowledge of the agreement says the San Francisco Giants are trading left-hander Matt Moore to the Texas Rangers for prospects. The swap was pending a physical, the person said Friday, Dec. 15, 2017 speaking on condition of anonymity because neither club had announced the deal. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 file photo, San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Moore throws to an Arizona Diamondbacks batter during the first inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. A person with direct knowledge of the agreement says the San Francisco Giants are trading left-hander Matt Moore to the Texas Rangers for prospects. The swap was pending a physical, the person said Friday, Dec. 15, 2017 speaking on condition of anonymity because neither club had announced the deal. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Indians&#39; Carlos Santana connects for a two-run home run against the New York Yankees during the fourth inning in Game 4 of baseball&#39;s American League Division Series, in New York. Two people familiar with the situation say the Phillies and veteran first baseman Carlos Santana have agreed to a three-year, $60 million deal. The people spoke Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, on condition of anonymity because the agreement is contingent on Santana passing a physical. The 31-year-old Santana hit 23 home runs and had 79 RBIs with Cleveland last season, where he had spent all eight years of his career. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
AP sources: Phillies, 1B Santana agree to $60M, 3-year deal
FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Indians' Carlos Santana connects for a two-run home run against the New York Yankees during the fourth inning in Game 4 of baseball's American League Division Series, in New York. Two people familiar with the situation say the Phillies and veteran first baseman Carlos Santana have agreed to a three-year, $60 million deal. The people spoke Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, on condition of anonymity because the agreement is contingent on Santana passing a physical. The 31-year-old Santana hit 23 home runs and had 79 RBIs with Cleveland last season, where he had spent all eight years of his career. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Indians&#39; Carlos Santana connects for a two-run home run against the New York Yankees during the fourth inning in Game 4 of baseball&#39;s American League Division Series, in New York. Two people familiar with the situation say the Phillies and veteran first baseman Carlos Santana have agreed to a three-year, $60 million deal. The people spoke Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, on condition of anonymity because the agreement is contingent on Santana passing a physical. The 31-year-old Santana hit 23 home runs and had 79 RBIs with Cleveland last season, where he had spent all eight years of his career. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Indians' Carlos Santana connects for a two-run home run against the New York Yankees during the fourth inning in Game 4 of baseball's American League Division Series, in New York. Two people familiar with the situation say the Phillies and veteran first baseman Carlos Santana have agreed to a three-year, $60 million deal. The people spoke Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, on condition of anonymity because the agreement is contingent on Santana passing a physical. The 31-year-old Santana hit 23 home runs and had 79 RBIs with Cleveland last season, where he had spent all eight years of his career. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Indians' Carlos Santana connects for a two-run home run against the New York Yankees during the fourth inning in Game 4 of baseball's American League Division Series, in New York. Two people familiar with the situation say the Phillies and veteran first baseman Carlos Santana have agreed to a three-year, $60 million deal. The people spoke Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, on condition of anonymity because the agreement is contingent on Santana passing a physical. The 31-year-old Santana hit 23 home runs and had 79 RBIs with Cleveland last season, where he had spent all eight years of his career. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
FILE - In this June 17, 2017, file photo, Cincinnati Reds&#39; Zack Cozart hits a double off Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu in the first inning of a baseball game, in Cincinnati. All-Star infielder Zack Cozart has agreed to a three-year contract with the Los Angeles Angels. The Angels announced their latest high-profile acquisition Friday, Dec. 15, 2017. Cozart is coming off an outstanding season with the Cincinnati Reds, his only previous big-league club. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
Angels grab All-Star Zack Cozart with $38M, 3-year deal
FILE - In this June 17, 2017, file photo, Cincinnati Reds' Zack Cozart hits a double off Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu in the first inning of a baseball game, in Cincinnati. All-Star infielder Zack Cozart has agreed to a three-year contract with the Los Angeles Angels. The Angels announced their latest high-profile acquisition Friday, Dec. 15, 2017. Cozart is coming off an outstanding season with the Cincinnati Reds, his only previous big-league club. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - In this June 17, 2017, file photo, Cincinnati Reds&#39; Zack Cozart hits a double off Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu in the first inning of a baseball game, in Cincinnati. All-Star infielder Zack Cozart has agreed to a three-year contract with the Los Angeles Angels. The Angels announced their latest high-profile acquisition Friday, Dec. 15, 2017. Cozart is coming off an outstanding season with the Cincinnati Reds, his only previous big-league club. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - In this June 17, 2017, file photo, Cincinnati Reds' Zack Cozart hits a double off Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu in the first inning of a baseball game, in Cincinnati. All-Star infielder Zack Cozart has agreed to a three-year contract with the Los Angeles Angels. The Angels announced their latest high-profile acquisition Friday, Dec. 15, 2017. Cozart is coming off an outstanding season with the Cincinnati Reds, his only previous big-league club. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - In this June 17, 2017, file photo, Cincinnati Reds' Zack Cozart hits a double off Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu in the first inning of a baseball game, in Cincinnati. All-Star infielder Zack Cozart has agreed to a three-year contract with the Los Angeles Angels. The Angels announced their latest high-profile acquisition Friday, Dec. 15, 2017. Cozart is coming off an outstanding season with the Cincinnati Reds, his only previous big-league club. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - In this June 20, 2017, file photo, Chicago White Sox relief pitcher Anthony Swarzak throws to the Minnesota Twins during the sixth inning of a baseball game, in Minneapolis. A person familiar with the contract tells The Associated Press that free-agent reliever Anthony Swarzak has reached a deal with the New York Mets. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at the winter meetings because Swarzak still needed to complete a physical. Swarzak is set to get $14 million over two years. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn, File)
Mets add Lobaton, finalize $14M, 2-year deal with Swarzak
FILE - In this June 20, 2017, file photo, Chicago White Sox relief pitcher Anthony Swarzak throws to the Minnesota Twins during the sixth inning of a baseball game, in Minneapolis. A person familiar with the contract tells The Associated Press that free-agent reliever Anthony Swarzak has reached a deal with the New York Mets. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017, at the winter meetings because Swarzak still needed to complete a physical. Swarzak is set to get $14 million over two years. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017 file photo, Milwaukee Brewers relief pitcher Anthony Swarzak delivers in the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Pittsburgh. A person familiar with the contract tells The Associated Press that free-agent reliever Anthony Swarzak has reached a deal with the New York Mets, Wednesdaqy, Dec. 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
Mets add Lobaton, finalize $14M, 2-year deal with Swarzak
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017 file photo, Milwaukee Brewers relief pitcher Anthony Swarzak delivers in the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Pittsburgh. A person familiar with the contract tells The Associated Press that free-agent reliever Anthony Swarzak has reached a deal with the New York Mets, Wednesdaqy, Dec. 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
<p>Former Yankees outfielder Dustin Fowler is suing the Chicago White Sox and the state agency that manages Guaranteed Rate Field after being seriously injured in his major league debut at the ballpark June 29, <a href="https://chicago.suntimes.com/sports/ballplayer-sues-white-sox-over-injury-at-guaranteed-rate-field/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:reports" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">reports</a> the <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em>. </p><p>The Sun-Times reported Fowler filed the lawsuit in Cook County Circuit Court on Friday, claiming the Sox and state agency were negligent because they failed to secure an unpadded electrical box along the right field line. The suit claims both parties knew of the unsafe condition and had time to improve it before the incident. It adds Fowler has suffered internal and external injuries while having to large amounts of money for medical care. </p><p>Fowler <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2017/06/29/dustin-fowler-yankees-rookie-injury-video" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:collided" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">collided</a> with the box, was unable to stay upright and was carted off the field, later undergoing surgery. </p><p>Fowler was the Yankees’ No. 10 prospect at the time according to Baseball America.</p><p>He was <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2017/08/01/ap-bba-athletics-fowlers-recovery" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:traded" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">traded</a> to the Athletics in July.</p>
Former Yankees Outfielder Dustin Fowler is Suing the White Sox

Former Yankees outfielder Dustin Fowler is suing the Chicago White Sox and the state agency that manages Guaranteed Rate Field after being seriously injured in his major league debut at the ballpark June 29, reports the Chicago Sun-Times.

The Sun-Times reported Fowler filed the lawsuit in Cook County Circuit Court on Friday, claiming the Sox and state agency were negligent because they failed to secure an unpadded electrical box along the right field line. The suit claims both parties knew of the unsafe condition and had time to improve it before the incident. It adds Fowler has suffered internal and external injuries while having to large amounts of money for medical care.

Fowler collided with the box, was unable to stay upright and was carted off the field, later undergoing surgery.

Fowler was the Yankees’ No. 10 prospect at the time according to Baseball America.

He was traded to the Athletics in July.

The San Francisco Giants have traded starting pitcher Matt Moore to the Texas Rangers, thus saving $9 million in salary space. (AP)
Giants Moves Baseball
The San Francisco Giants have traded starting pitcher Matt Moore to the Texas Rangers, thus saving $9 million in salary space. (AP)
FILE - In this May 2, 2015, file photo, New York Yankees&#39; Chris Martin pitches during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox in Boston. The Texas Rangers have finalized Martins $4 million, two-year contract after the homegrown pitcher spent the past two seasons in Japan. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
Chris Martin joins hometown Rangers after 2 years in Japan
FILE - In this May 2, 2015, file photo, New York Yankees' Chris Martin pitches during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox in Boston. The Texas Rangers have finalized Martins $4 million, two-year contract after the homegrown pitcher spent the past two seasons in Japan. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks relief pitcher Fernando Rodney celebrates after a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Kansas City, Mo. A person familiar with the negotiations says Rodney and the Minnesota Twins have agreed to a $4.5 million, one-year contract. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, because the agreement had not yet been announced. Rodney, who turns 41 on March 18 and will be in his 16th major league season, is known for firing an imaginary arrow to celebrate the final out of wins. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
Fernando Rodney, Twins finalize $4.5M, 1-year contract
FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks relief pitcher Fernando Rodney celebrates after a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Kansas City, Mo. A person familiar with the negotiations says Rodney and the Minnesota Twins have agreed to a $4.5 million, one-year contract. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, because the agreement had not yet been announced. Rodney, who turns 41 on March 18 and will be in his 16th major league season, is known for firing an imaginary arrow to celebrate the final out of wins. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks relief pitcher Fernando Rodney celebrates after a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Kansas City, Mo. A person familiar with the negotiations says Rodney and the Minnesota Twins have agreed to a $4.5 million, one-year contract. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, because the agreement had not yet been announced. Rodney, who turns 41 on March 18 and will be in his 16th major league season, is known for firing an imaginary arrow to celebrate the final out of wins. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks relief pitcher Fernando Rodney celebrates after a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Kansas City, Mo. A person familiar with the negotiations says Rodney and the Minnesota Twins have agreed to a $4.5 million, one-year contract. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, because the agreement had not yet been announced. Rodney, who turns 41 on March 18 and will be in his 16th major league season, is known for firing an imaginary arrow to celebrate the final out of wins. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2017, file photo, Arizona Diamondbacks relief pitcher Fernando Rodney celebrates after a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals in Kansas City, Mo. A person familiar with the negotiations says Rodney and the Minnesota Twins have agreed to a $4.5 million, one-year contract. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, because the agreement had not yet been announced. Rodney, who turns 41 on March 18 and will be in his 16th major league season, is known for firing an imaginary arrow to celebrate the final out of wins. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
FILE - In this June 28, 2017 photo, St. Louis Cardinals&#39; Stephen Piscotty gets hit with a pitch against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. Piscotty was traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Oakland Athletics for a pair of infield prospects, allowing the outfielder to be near his family&#39;s home in Pleasanton, California, following his mother&#39;s diagnosis with Lou Gehrig&#39;s disease. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
Stephen Piscotty thankful to play with A's near ailing mom
FILE - In this June 28, 2017 photo, St. Louis Cardinals' Stephen Piscotty gets hit with a pitch against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. Piscotty was traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Oakland Athletics for a pair of infield prospects, allowing the outfielder to be near his family's home in Pleasanton, California, following his mother's diagnosis with Lou Gehrig's disease. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
FILE - In this June 28, 2017 photo, St. Louis Cardinals&#39; Stephen Piscotty gets hit with a pitch against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. Piscotty was traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Oakland Athletics for a pair of infield prospects, allowing the outfielder to be near his family&#39;s home in Pleasanton, California, following his mother&#39;s diagnosis with Lou Gehrig&#39;s disease. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
FILE - In this June 28, 2017 photo, St. Louis Cardinals' Stephen Piscotty gets hit with a pitch against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. Piscotty was traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Oakland Athletics for a pair of infield prospects, allowing the outfielder to be near his family's home in Pleasanton, California, following his mother's diagnosis with Lou Gehrig's disease. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
FILE - In this June 28, 2017 photo, St. Louis Cardinals' Stephen Piscotty gets hit with a pitch against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Phoenix. Piscotty was traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Oakland Athletics for a pair of infield prospects, allowing the outfielder to be near his family's home in Pleasanton, California, following his mother's diagnosis with Lou Gehrig's disease. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2016, file photo, Cleveland Indians relief pitcher Bryan Shaw throws during the seventh inning of Game 3 of the Major League Baseball World Series against the Chicago Cubs, in Chicago. Colorado finalized $27 million, three-year contracts with right-hander Bryan Shaw and lefty Jake McGee on Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, moves the Rockies hope will fortify their bullpen. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
Rockies finalize $27M, 3-year deals with Shaw, McGee
FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2016, file photo, Cleveland Indians relief pitcher Bryan Shaw throws during the seventh inning of Game 3 of the Major League Baseball World Series against the Chicago Cubs, in Chicago. Colorado finalized $27 million, three-year contracts with right-hander Bryan Shaw and lefty Jake McGee on Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, moves the Rockies hope will fortify their bullpen. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
FILE - In this May 19, 2017, file photo, Colorado Rockies relief pitcher Jake McGee throws in the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, in Cincinnati. Colorado finalized $27 million, three-year contracts with right-hander Bryan Shaw and lefty Jake McGee on Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, moves the Rockies hope will fortify their bullpen. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
Rockies finalize $27M, 3-year deals with Shaw, McGee
FILE - In this May 19, 2017, file photo, Colorado Rockies relief pitcher Jake McGee throws in the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, in Cincinnati. Colorado finalized $27 million, three-year contracts with right-hander Bryan Shaw and lefty Jake McGee on Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, moves the Rockies hope will fortify their bullpen. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Hector Rondon throws during the third inning of Game 5 of baseball&#39;s National League Championship Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Chicago. Reliever Hector Rondon has agreed to an $8.5 million, two-year contract with the World Series champion Houston Astros. The 29-year-old right-hander gets $4 million next year and $4.5 million in 2019. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
Hector Rondon agrees to $8.5M, 2-year deal with Astros
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Hector Rondon throws during the third inning of Game 5 of baseball's National League Championship Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Chicago. Reliever Hector Rondon has agreed to an $8.5 million, two-year contract with the World Series champion Houston Astros. The 29-year-old right-hander gets $4 million next year and $4.5 million in 2019. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
FILE - In this May 2, 2015, file photo, New York Yankees&#39; Chris Martin pitches during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox in Boston. The Texas Rangers have finalized Martin’s $4 million, two-year contract after the homegrown pitcher spent the past two seasons in Japan. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this May 2, 2015, file photo, New York Yankees' Chris Martin pitches during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox in Boston. The Texas Rangers have finalized Martin’s $4 million, two-year contract after the homegrown pitcher spent the past two seasons in Japan. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this May 2, 2015, file photo, New York Yankees' Chris Martin pitches during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox in Boston. The Texas Rangers have finalized Martin’s $4 million, two-year contract after the homegrown pitcher spent the past two seasons in Japan. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Hector Rondon throws during the third inning of Game 5 of baseball&#39;s National League Championship Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Chicago. Reliever Hector Rondon has agreed to an $8.5 million, two-year contract with the World Series champion Houston Astros. The 29-year-old right-hander gets $4 million next year and $4.5 million in 2019. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Hector Rondon throws during the third inning of Game 5 of baseball's National League Championship Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Chicago. Reliever Hector Rondon has agreed to an $8.5 million, two-year contract with the World Series champion Houston Astros. The 29-year-old right-hander gets $4 million next year and $4.5 million in 2019. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Hector Rondon throws during the third inning of Game 5 of baseball's National League Championship Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Chicago. Reliever Hector Rondon has agreed to an $8.5 million, two-year contract with the World Series champion Houston Astros. The 29-year-old right-hander gets $4 million next year and $4.5 million in 2019. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)

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