Top MLB Photos

Check out the best shots of the day.

Lawyer Domenic Basile speaks outside of Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile speaks outside of Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile speaks outside of Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground left, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground left, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground left, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, right, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, right, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, right, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids deliver caps and cards to elderly dads for Father's Day
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids deliver caps and cards to elderly dads for Father's Day
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids deliver caps and cards to elderly dads for Father's Day
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids deliver caps and cards to elderly dads for Father's Day
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Seattle Mariners relief pitcher Edwin Diaz signs autographs for fans before a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera points during the first inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera points during the first inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera points during the first inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera during the first inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera during the first inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera during the first inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson pitches during the first inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson pitches during the first inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson pitches during the first inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Hernan Perez reacts after hitting a double during the second inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Hernan Perez reacts after hitting a double during the second inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Hernan Perez reacts after hitting a double during the second inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar waits for a pitch during the third inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar waits for a pitch during the third inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar waits for a pitch during the third inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson pitches during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson pitches during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson pitches during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Travis Shaw during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Travis Shaw during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Travis Shaw during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jonathan Villar reacts after hitting a double during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jonathan Villar reacts after hitting a double during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jonathan Villar reacts after hitting a double during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson wipes his face during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson wipes his face during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Chase Anderson wipes his face during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Maikel Franco throws to first during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Maikel Franco throws to first during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Maikel Franco throws to first during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Gabe Kapler asks for a review during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Gabe Kapler asks for a review during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Gabe Kapler asks for a review during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Hernan Perez fails to turn a double play after forcing Philadelphia Phillies' Nick Williams out at second base during the sixth inning of a baseball game Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Hernan Perez fails to turn a double play after forcing Philadelphia Phillies' Nick Williams out at second base during the sixth inning of a baseball game Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Hernan Perez fails to turn a double play after forcing Philadelphia Phillies' Nick Williams out at second base during the sixth inning of a baseball game Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jonathan Villar reacts after hitting a double during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jonathan Villar reacts after hitting a double during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jonathan Villar reacts after hitting a double during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Aaron Nola during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Aaron Nola during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Aaron Nola during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Eric Thames steals a base during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Eric Thames steals a base during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Eric Thames steals a base during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Manny Pina reacts after hitting a double during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Manny Pina reacts after hitting a double during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Manny Pina reacts after hitting a double during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Rhys Hoskins swings and misses during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Rhys Hoskins swings and misses during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Rhys Hoskins swings and misses during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Adrian Houser vomits during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Adrian Houser vomits during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Adrian Houser vomits during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Maikel Franco hits during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Maikel Franco hits during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Maikel Franco hits during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Lorenzo Cain makes a catch in the outfield during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Lorenzo Cain makes a catch in the outfield during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Lorenzo Cain makes a catch in the outfield during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar celebrates with Ed Sedar after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar celebrates with Ed Sedar after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar celebrates with Ed Sedar after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun reacts after striking out during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun reacts after striking out during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun reacts after striking out during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar is congratulated by teammates in the dugout after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar is congratulated by teammates in the dugout after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar is congratulated by teammates in the dugout after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar reacts after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar reacts after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Jesus Aguilar reacts after hitting a home run during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Rhys Hoskins fields a ball in the outfield during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Rhys Hoskins fields a ball in the outfield during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Rhys Hoskins fields a ball in the outfield during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun waits for a pitch during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun waits for a pitch during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun waits for a pitch during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera reacts after making a catch at the wall during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera reacts after making a catch at the wall during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Philadelphia Phillies' Odubel Herrera reacts after making a catch at the wall during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers Sunday, June 17, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Andy Murray returns to the match court on Tuesday at Queen’s Club, 342 days after his most recent official appearance in last year’s Wimbledon quarter-final. It is hard to know what to expect, especially as Murray’s opponent – Nick Kyrgios – is the most unpredictable talent on the circuit. Speaking to reporters on Monday, even Kyrgios himself sounded conflicted about this meeting with one of his closest friends in the locker-room – a mentor and role model who has beaten him in all five of their previous encounters. “I just smiled,” said Kyrgios on Monday, when asked for his thoughts when he first saw the draw. “I'm excited. Obviously one of my better mates on tour. It's just good to see him back ultimately. I think it's been pretty s---ty without him I'm looking forward to going out there and playing. But to see him healthy is obviously the main thing. I think he's awesome for the sport.” So will it be all business when the match starts? Can Kyrgios slip into a ruthless mindset when dealing with “one of my better mates on tour”? That one drew a typically honest answer from a man whose approach to tennis has something of the flannel-clad amateur about it. “Oh, I don't know if it's business only and ruthless,” said Kyrgios, who demonstrated his quality on this surface when he pushed Roger Federer to within a couple of points of defeat on Saturday. “I don't know if I ever have that mentality. I mean, obviously I'm going to go out there and want to win. Don't get me wrong. But I'm not going to not have fun or not enjoy myself at the same time.” Kyrgios and Murray get on very well off the court Credit: REUTERS Murray said on Saturday that he had “zero expectations” of himself during this grass-court season, and added that he wouldn’t be backing himself to beat Kyrgios. “I don’t think it would be right to think that way after such a long time out, but obviously I want to play well and feel good on the court.” Unless Murray should pull a rabbit out of his baseball cap on Tuesday, this feels like a toe-dipping exercise, designed primarily to test how strongly he can perform, and – perhaps more importantly – how his body will respond to the unique stresses of competitive matchplay. Every tennis player says the same thing: you can train all you want, but until the adrenaline starts flowing in earnest, there is no way of approximating the full experience of playing on centre court in front of a 9,000-strong crowd. “Obviously I’d love to win the tournament,” Murray told the BBC, “but I’m not thinking about that. It’s about seeing where my game is at, hopefully moving well and not restricted. I think it’s still possible to compete [for a grand-slam title] but after you’ve been out as long as I have, that’s not how it works. Murray has won Queen's five times Credit: PA “There’s never a time when you feel perfect,” Murray added. “It’s not a gamble in terms that I’m going to re-injure my hip. But if I missed the grass-court season and tried to play in five weeks’ time, the same doubts would be there. You re-evaluate. You find that out by being out there. It’s very different from the controlled environment of the practice court. I didn’t want to get back on the match court until I felt I could compete. Hopefully the body responds well. I expect to be a bit stiff and sore after it.” The grass courts of Queen’s hold many happy memories for Murray, who has won a record five titles here, and also claimed his first tour victory – over Spain’s Santiago Ventura – after receiving a wild card in 2005. But Murray will have to watch his footing carefully. No-one is allowed to practise on centre court before the Fever-Tree Championships start, so when the matchplay gets underway the surface is always rather lush and slippery. Several players tumbled over on Monday, and as the British No. 2 Cameron Norrie put it after his loss to Stan Wawrinka, “I didn’t really feel comfortable on my feet. I felt like out of the corners I was going to slip, and I didn’t really want to tear up my hip or anything. So I kind of played it safe.”
'Awesome' Andy Murray welcomed back by Nick Kyrgios ahead of Queen's showdown
Andy Murray returns to the match court on Tuesday at Queen’s Club, 342 days after his most recent official appearance in last year’s Wimbledon quarter-final. It is hard to know what to expect, especially as Murray’s opponent – Nick Kyrgios – is the most unpredictable talent on the circuit. Speaking to reporters on Monday, even Kyrgios himself sounded conflicted about this meeting with one of his closest friends in the locker-room – a mentor and role model who has beaten him in all five of their previous encounters. “I just smiled,” said Kyrgios on Monday, when asked for his thoughts when he first saw the draw. “I'm excited. Obviously one of my better mates on tour. It's just good to see him back ultimately. I think it's been pretty s---ty without him I'm looking forward to going out there and playing. But to see him healthy is obviously the main thing. I think he's awesome for the sport.” So will it be all business when the match starts? Can Kyrgios slip into a ruthless mindset when dealing with “one of my better mates on tour”? That one drew a typically honest answer from a man whose approach to tennis has something of the flannel-clad amateur about it. “Oh, I don't know if it's business only and ruthless,” said Kyrgios, who demonstrated his quality on this surface when he pushed Roger Federer to within a couple of points of defeat on Saturday. “I don't know if I ever have that mentality. I mean, obviously I'm going to go out there and want to win. Don't get me wrong. But I'm not going to not have fun or not enjoy myself at the same time.” Kyrgios and Murray get on very well off the court Credit: REUTERS Murray said on Saturday that he had “zero expectations” of himself during this grass-court season, and added that he wouldn’t be backing himself to beat Kyrgios. “I don’t think it would be right to think that way after such a long time out, but obviously I want to play well and feel good on the court.” Unless Murray should pull a rabbit out of his baseball cap on Tuesday, this feels like a toe-dipping exercise, designed primarily to test how strongly he can perform, and – perhaps more importantly – how his body will respond to the unique stresses of competitive matchplay. Every tennis player says the same thing: you can train all you want, but until the adrenaline starts flowing in earnest, there is no way of approximating the full experience of playing on centre court in front of a 9,000-strong crowd. “Obviously I’d love to win the tournament,” Murray told the BBC, “but I’m not thinking about that. It’s about seeing where my game is at, hopefully moving well and not restricted. I think it’s still possible to compete [for a grand-slam title] but after you’ve been out as long as I have, that’s not how it works. Murray has won Queen's five times Credit: PA “There’s never a time when you feel perfect,” Murray added. “It’s not a gamble in terms that I’m going to re-injure my hip. But if I missed the grass-court season and tried to play in five weeks’ time, the same doubts would be there. You re-evaluate. You find that out by being out there. It’s very different from the controlled environment of the practice court. I didn’t want to get back on the match court until I felt I could compete. Hopefully the body responds well. I expect to be a bit stiff and sore after it.” The grass courts of Queen’s hold many happy memories for Murray, who has won a record five titles here, and also claimed his first tour victory – over Spain’s Santiago Ventura – after receiving a wild card in 2005. But Murray will have to watch his footing carefully. No-one is allowed to practise on centre court before the Fever-Tree Championships start, so when the matchplay gets underway the surface is always rather lush and slippery. Several players tumbled over on Monday, and as the British No. 2 Cameron Norrie put it after his loss to Stan Wawrinka, “I didn’t really feel comfortable on my feet. I felt like out of the corners I was going to slip, and I didn’t really want to tear up my hip or anything. So I kind of played it safe.”
Andy Murray returns to the match court on Tuesday at Queen’s Club, 342 days after his most recent official appearance in last year’s Wimbledon quarter-final. It is hard to know what to expect, especially as Murray’s opponent – Nick Kyrgios – is the most unpredictable talent on the circuit. Speaking to reporters on Monday, even Kyrgios himself sounded conflicted about this meeting with one of his closest friends in the locker-room – a mentor and role model who has beaten him in all five of their previous encounters. “I just smiled,” said Kyrgios on Monday, when asked for his thoughts when he first saw the draw. “I'm excited. Obviously one of my better mates on tour. It's just good to see him back ultimately. I think it's been pretty s---ty without him I'm looking forward to going out there and playing. But to see him healthy is obviously the main thing. I think he's awesome for the sport.” So will it be all business when the match starts? Can Kyrgios slip into a ruthless mindset when dealing with “one of my better mates on tour”? That one drew a typically honest answer from a man whose approach to tennis has something of the flannel-clad amateur about it. “Oh, I don't know if it's business only and ruthless,” said Kyrgios, who demonstrated his quality on this surface when he pushed Roger Federer to within a couple of points of defeat on Saturday. “I don't know if I ever have that mentality. I mean, obviously I'm going to go out there and want to win. Don't get me wrong. But I'm not going to not have fun or not enjoy myself at the same time.” Kyrgios and Murray get on very well off the court Credit: REUTERS Murray said on Saturday that he had “zero expectations” of himself during this grass-court season, and added that he wouldn’t be backing himself to beat Kyrgios. “I don’t think it would be right to think that way after such a long time out, but obviously I want to play well and feel good on the court.” Unless Murray should pull a rabbit out of his baseball cap on Tuesday, this feels like a toe-dipping exercise, designed primarily to test how strongly he can perform, and – perhaps more importantly – how his body will respond to the unique stresses of competitive matchplay. Every tennis player says the same thing: you can train all you want, but until the adrenaline starts flowing in earnest, there is no way of approximating the full experience of playing on centre court in front of a 9,000-strong crowd. “Obviously I’d love to win the tournament,” Murray told the BBC, “but I’m not thinking about that. It’s about seeing where my game is at, hopefully moving well and not restricted. I think it’s still possible to compete [for a grand-slam title] but after you’ve been out as long as I have, that’s not how it works. Murray has won Queen's five times Credit: PA “There’s never a time when you feel perfect,” Murray added. “It’s not a gamble in terms that I’m going to re-injure my hip. But if I missed the grass-court season and tried to play in five weeks’ time, the same doubts would be there. You re-evaluate. You find that out by being out there. It’s very different from the controlled environment of the practice court. I didn’t want to get back on the match court until I felt I could compete. Hopefully the body responds well. I expect to be a bit stiff and sore after it.” The grass courts of Queen’s hold many happy memories for Murray, who has won a record five titles here, and also claimed his first tour victory – over Spain’s Santiago Ventura – after receiving a wild card in 2005. But Murray will have to watch his footing carefully. No-one is allowed to practise on centre court before the Fever-Tree Championships start, so when the matchplay gets underway the surface is always rather lush and slippery. Several players tumbled over on Monday, and as the British No. 2 Cameron Norrie put it after his loss to Stan Wawrinka, “I didn’t really feel comfortable on my feet. I felt like out of the corners I was going to slip, and I didn’t really want to tear up my hip or anything. So I kind of played it safe.”
'Awesome' Andy Murray welcomed back by Nick Kyrgios ahead of Queen's showdown
Andy Murray returns to the match court on Tuesday at Queen’s Club, 342 days after his most recent official appearance in last year’s Wimbledon quarter-final. It is hard to know what to expect, especially as Murray’s opponent – Nick Kyrgios – is the most unpredictable talent on the circuit. Speaking to reporters on Monday, even Kyrgios himself sounded conflicted about this meeting with one of his closest friends in the locker-room – a mentor and role model who has beaten him in all five of their previous encounters. “I just smiled,” said Kyrgios on Monday, when asked for his thoughts when he first saw the draw. “I'm excited. Obviously one of my better mates on tour. It's just good to see him back ultimately. I think it's been pretty s---ty without him I'm looking forward to going out there and playing. But to see him healthy is obviously the main thing. I think he's awesome for the sport.” So will it be all business when the match starts? Can Kyrgios slip into a ruthless mindset when dealing with “one of my better mates on tour”? That one drew a typically honest answer from a man whose approach to tennis has something of the flannel-clad amateur about it. “Oh, I don't know if it's business only and ruthless,” said Kyrgios, who demonstrated his quality on this surface when he pushed Roger Federer to within a couple of points of defeat on Saturday. “I don't know if I ever have that mentality. I mean, obviously I'm going to go out there and want to win. Don't get me wrong. But I'm not going to not have fun or not enjoy myself at the same time.” Kyrgios and Murray get on very well off the court Credit: REUTERS Murray said on Saturday that he had “zero expectations” of himself during this grass-court season, and added that he wouldn’t be backing himself to beat Kyrgios. “I don’t think it would be right to think that way after such a long time out, but obviously I want to play well and feel good on the court.” Unless Murray should pull a rabbit out of his baseball cap on Tuesday, this feels like a toe-dipping exercise, designed primarily to test how strongly he can perform, and – perhaps more importantly – how his body will respond to the unique stresses of competitive matchplay. Every tennis player says the same thing: you can train all you want, but until the adrenaline starts flowing in earnest, there is no way of approximating the full experience of playing on centre court in front of a 9,000-strong crowd. “Obviously I’d love to win the tournament,” Murray told the BBC, “but I’m not thinking about that. It’s about seeing where my game is at, hopefully moving well and not restricted. I think it’s still possible to compete [for a grand-slam title] but after you’ve been out as long as I have, that’s not how it works. Murray has won Queen's five times Credit: PA “There’s never a time when you feel perfect,” Murray added. “It’s not a gamble in terms that I’m going to re-injure my hip. But if I missed the grass-court season and tried to play in five weeks’ time, the same doubts would be there. You re-evaluate. You find that out by being out there. It’s very different from the controlled environment of the practice court. I didn’t want to get back on the match court until I felt I could compete. Hopefully the body responds well. I expect to be a bit stiff and sore after it.” The grass courts of Queen’s hold many happy memories for Murray, who has won a record five titles here, and also claimed his first tour victory – over Spain’s Santiago Ventura – after receiving a wild card in 2005. But Murray will have to watch his footing carefully. No-one is allowed to practise on centre court before the Fever-Tree Championships start, so when the matchplay gets underway the surface is always rather lush and slippery. Several players tumbled over on Monday, and as the British No. 2 Cameron Norrie put it after his loss to Stan Wawrinka, “I didn’t really feel comfortable on my feet. I felt like out of the corners I was going to slip, and I didn’t really want to tear up my hip or anything. So I kind of played it safe.”
Andy Murray returns to the match court on Tuesday at Queen’s Club, 342 days after his most recent official appearance in last year’s Wimbledon quarter-final. It is hard to know what to expect, especially as Murray’s opponent – Nick Kyrgios – is the most unpredictable talent on the circuit. Speaking to reporters on Monday, even Kyrgios himself sounded conflicted about this meeting with one of his closest friends in the locker-room – a mentor and role model who has beaten him in all five of their previous encounters. “I just smiled,” said Kyrgios on Monday, when asked for his thoughts when he first saw the draw. “I'm excited. Obviously one of my better mates on tour. It's just good to see him back ultimately. I think it's been pretty s---ty without him I'm looking forward to going out there and playing. But to see him healthy is obviously the main thing. I think he's awesome for the sport.” So will it be all business when the match starts? Can Kyrgios slip into a ruthless mindset when dealing with “one of my better mates on tour”? That one drew a typically honest answer from a man whose approach to tennis has something of the flannel-clad amateur about it. “Oh, I don't know if it's business only and ruthless,” said Kyrgios, who demonstrated his quality on this surface when he pushed Roger Federer to within a couple of points of defeat on Saturday. “I don't know if I ever have that mentality. I mean, obviously I'm going to go out there and want to win. Don't get me wrong. But I'm not going to not have fun or not enjoy myself at the same time.” Kyrgios and Murray get on very well off the court Credit: REUTERS Murray said on Saturday that he had “zero expectations” of himself during this grass-court season, and added that he wouldn’t be backing himself to beat Kyrgios. “I don’t think it would be right to think that way after such a long time out, but obviously I want to play well and feel good on the court.” Unless Murray should pull a rabbit out of his baseball cap on Tuesday, this feels like a toe-dipping exercise, designed primarily to test how strongly he can perform, and – perhaps more importantly – how his body will respond to the unique stresses of competitive matchplay. Every tennis player says the same thing: you can train all you want, but until the adrenaline starts flowing in earnest, there is no way of approximating the full experience of playing on centre court in front of a 9,000-strong crowd. “Obviously I’d love to win the tournament,” Murray told the BBC, “but I’m not thinking about that. It’s about seeing where my game is at, hopefully moving well and not restricted. I think it’s still possible to compete [for a grand-slam title] but after you’ve been out as long as I have, that’s not how it works. Murray has won Queen's five times Credit: PA “There’s never a time when you feel perfect,” Murray added. “It’s not a gamble in terms that I’m going to re-injure my hip. But if I missed the grass-court season and tried to play in five weeks’ time, the same doubts would be there. You re-evaluate. You find that out by being out there. It’s very different from the controlled environment of the practice court. I didn’t want to get back on the match court until I felt I could compete. Hopefully the body responds well. I expect to be a bit stiff and sore after it.” The grass courts of Queen’s hold many happy memories for Murray, who has won a record five titles here, and also claimed his first tour victory – over Spain’s Santiago Ventura – after receiving a wild card in 2005. But Murray will have to watch his footing carefully. No-one is allowed to practise on centre court before the Fever-Tree Championships start, so when the matchplay gets underway the surface is always rather lush and slippery. Several players tumbled over on Monday, and as the British No. 2 Cameron Norrie put it after his loss to Stan Wawrinka, “I didn’t really feel comfortable on my feet. I felt like out of the corners I was going to slip, and I didn’t really want to tear up my hip or anything. So I kind of played it safe.”
'Awesome' Andy Murray welcomed back by Nick Kyrgios ahead of Queen's showdown
Andy Murray returns to the match court on Tuesday at Queen’s Club, 342 days after his most recent official appearance in last year’s Wimbledon quarter-final. It is hard to know what to expect, especially as Murray’s opponent – Nick Kyrgios – is the most unpredictable talent on the circuit. Speaking to reporters on Monday, even Kyrgios himself sounded conflicted about this meeting with one of his closest friends in the locker-room – a mentor and role model who has beaten him in all five of their previous encounters. “I just smiled,” said Kyrgios on Monday, when asked for his thoughts when he first saw the draw. “I'm excited. Obviously one of my better mates on tour. It's just good to see him back ultimately. I think it's been pretty s---ty without him I'm looking forward to going out there and playing. But to see him healthy is obviously the main thing. I think he's awesome for the sport.” So will it be all business when the match starts? Can Kyrgios slip into a ruthless mindset when dealing with “one of my better mates on tour”? That one drew a typically honest answer from a man whose approach to tennis has something of the flannel-clad amateur about it. “Oh, I don't know if it's business only and ruthless,” said Kyrgios, who demonstrated his quality on this surface when he pushed Roger Federer to within a couple of points of defeat on Saturday. “I don't know if I ever have that mentality. I mean, obviously I'm going to go out there and want to win. Don't get me wrong. But I'm not going to not have fun or not enjoy myself at the same time.” Kyrgios and Murray get on very well off the court Credit: REUTERS Murray said on Saturday that he had “zero expectations” of himself during this grass-court season, and added that he wouldn’t be backing himself to beat Kyrgios. “I don’t think it would be right to think that way after such a long time out, but obviously I want to play well and feel good on the court.” Unless Murray should pull a rabbit out of his baseball cap on Tuesday, this feels like a toe-dipping exercise, designed primarily to test how strongly he can perform, and – perhaps more importantly – how his body will respond to the unique stresses of competitive matchplay. Every tennis player says the same thing: you can train all you want, but until the adrenaline starts flowing in earnest, there is no way of approximating the full experience of playing on centre court in front of a 9,000-strong crowd. “Obviously I’d love to win the tournament,” Murray told the BBC, “but I’m not thinking about that. It’s about seeing where my game is at, hopefully moving well and not restricted. I think it’s still possible to compete [for a grand-slam title] but after you’ve been out as long as I have, that’s not how it works. Murray has won Queen's five times Credit: PA “There’s never a time when you feel perfect,” Murray added. “It’s not a gamble in terms that I’m going to re-injure my hip. But if I missed the grass-court season and tried to play in five weeks’ time, the same doubts would be there. You re-evaluate. You find that out by being out there. It’s very different from the controlled environment of the practice court. I didn’t want to get back on the match court until I felt I could compete. Hopefully the body responds well. I expect to be a bit stiff and sore after it.” The grass courts of Queen’s hold many happy memories for Murray, who has won a record five titles here, and also claimed his first tour victory – over Spain’s Santiago Ventura – after receiving a wild card in 2005. But Murray will have to watch his footing carefully. No-one is allowed to practise on centre court before the Fever-Tree Championships start, so when the matchplay gets underway the surface is always rather lush and slippery. Several players tumbled over on Monday, and as the British No. 2 Cameron Norrie put it after his loss to Stan Wawrinka, “I didn’t really feel comfortable on my feet. I felt like out of the corners I was going to slip, and I didn’t really want to tear up my hip or anything. So I kind of played it safe.”
Lawyer Domenic Basile speaks outside of Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile speaks outside of Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile speaks outside of Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground left, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground left, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground left, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, right, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, right, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, right, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Lawyer Domenic Basile, foreground, arrives at Old City Hall on behalf of accused Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Roberto Osuna in Toronto, Monday, June 18, 2018. Osuna was charged with one count of assault by Toronto police early last month. He was placed on administrative leave by Major League Baseball, in accordance with the league's domestic violence policy. (Tijana Martin./The Canadian Press via AP)
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids deliver caps and cards to elderly dads for Father's Day
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids deliver caps and cards to elderly dads for Father's Day
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.
Kids deliver caps and cards to elderly dads for Father's Day
Kids from Salinas Valley Community Church delivered baseball caps and cards to men living in Sunrise Villa Senior Living Community on Saturday. The event was sponsored by Alliance on Aging's Ombudsman program, which advocates for the safety and wellbeing of seniors in longterm care facilities.

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