Tiger Woods

Tiger Woods returns to golf

On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
Today in Golf History: Tiger Woods wins 2008 U.S. Open
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
Today in Golf History: Tiger Woods wins 2008 U.S. Open
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
Today in Golf History: Tiger Woods wins 2008 U.S. Open
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
Today in Golf History: Tiger Woods wins 2008 U.S. Open
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
Today in Golf History: Tiger Woods wins 2008 U.S. Open
On June 16, 2008, Tiger Woods took home his 14th major championship, the U.S. Open, which is the last major he has won to date.
For the third time in as many years, Rory McIlroy is on his sofa watching the weekend action from the US Open instead of being involved. Yet while the Ulsterman joked, “I have only had three majors to target”, Paul McGinley believes there are “issues to be addressed”. McGinley, the 2016 Ryder Cup captain, is close to McIlroy and rates himself as one of his biggest supporters. But after watching him crash out here for a depressing hat-trick of missed cuts on 10-over, he was courageous enough to state what he believes is wrong. To McGinley, the golfing landscape has radically changed since McIlroy introduced himself as the heir to Tiger Woods at the start of the decade and he needs to rededicate himself to the challenge. McGinley craves to witness the old McIlroy, with those “pointy elbows” which pushed aside his rivals and as he takes his miserable downtime before reappearing on Thursday at the Travelers Championship – where he will look for just his second victory of any description in 20 months – he could do far worse than digest the comments. Yes his friend recognises that this campaign has been far from a disastrous one thus far – with a win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March, as well as a fifth at the Masters and two runners-up, including at the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth three months ago – but McGinley cannot help but feel McIlroy’s bar must be set somewhat higher. McIlroy alongside Jordan Spieth in Southampton, N.Y. Credit: AP “There are definitely issues that need to be addressed,” McGinley said. “But I certainly don’t see it as technical. People say about his putting but from what we saw at Bay Hill [in Orlando, where he won in March] he is an inspirational putter and he’s always been. I think it’s more to do with attitude and the second phase of his career. In his first phase we have a saying in Ireland that he had ‘pointy elbows’ – ‘get out of my way, here I come, just watch me, I’m going to dominate’. “That doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. I know the competition has got better but that attitude of Rory’s, bouncing down the fairways and just steamrollering the field, we haven’t seen in a while. Yeah, he won at Bay Hill this year, but he won from getting into contention in the last four or five holes and then having a flurry of birdies to get over the line. That’s what we want to see back, that’s when Rory is at his best. When he has those pointy elbows and he’s bouncing down the fairways and he’s dominating.” But how to get there? McGinley, who is here on Long Island working for Sky, believes he must look forwards for the answers and not backwards and as the 29-year-old stands at the crossroads of a career which boasts four majors, but none in the last four years, McGinley feels the necessity for a fresh attitude and the “drive” to learn how to tackle the more arduous challenges. McIlroy talks with his caddie Harry Diamond Credit: GETTY IMAGES “He’s not the new kid on the block anymore,” McGinley said. “When he was winning his major championships, the last of which was four years ago, he was out on his own, he drove the ball better than anyone else. But now there are four, five six guys who can drive as long and as straight as him. “He’s made a lot of money in the last number of years, won his tournaments and has a big CV and is well known around the world. This is a new phase of his career and it’s going to take a new attitude and a new drive to go with it. That’s what missing. “The second thing that is missing is his ability to play tough courses. His CV is littered with success, but it’s not littered with success on brutally tough golf courses, war of attrition type courses, like the one he was presented with here. Those issues need to be addressed for Rory if he is continue on the [trend of the] tremendous early part of his career.” Of course, McIlroy has already won America’s national championship but that was in 2011 on the saturated Congressional course in Washington, which presented a benign test as far removed from Shinnecock Hills as can be imagined. Nevertheless, McIlroy claimed he was ready for this examination. It is just that the syllabus changed when the 30mph gusts came in during Thursday’s first round. McIlroy after winning the US Open back in 2011 Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Those conditions took me by surprise and that is what really got me,” McIlroy said. “The conditions were a lot better [on Friday] and I played well – the way I have been playing in decent conditions recently. “It feels like the last three years I have only had three Majors to target and this one has been a write-off! Every time you come in to a US Open you know it’s going to be tough. I showed glimpses of the good form but I just wish I had handled the conditions better in the first round. “I felt my game was in good shape – I felt the long game was there; the short game was there. I felt like I didn’t hit that bad shots [in his 80] – I just wasn’t prepared for those conditions.” The truth is, McIlroy actually was on the easier side of the starting sheets. The average round for those drawn early-late was roughly 74.5 while the average for the late-early wave was 75.6. It was more than a shot advantage but still McIlroy found himself 14 behind world No 1 Dustin Johnson, who built up his four-shot halfway advantage from the unfortunate half. McIlroy’s reservations about “tough conditions” hardly bode well for The Open in five weeks’ time. Carnoustie is definitely the hardest course on the Open rota and, if Mother Nature is feeling malicious, can even be classed as the most demanding of all the major venues. Before then he tackles what is likely to be a generous set-up in Connecticut, before the Irish Open, which he promotes at Ballyliffin. On the rugged links at the tip of Co Donegal it will all get serious again.
Rory McIlroy must rediscover his 'pointy elbows' as he enters a new phase of his career
For the third time in as many years, Rory McIlroy is on his sofa watching the weekend action from the US Open instead of being involved. Yet while the Ulsterman joked, “I have only had three majors to target”, Paul McGinley believes there are “issues to be addressed”. McGinley, the 2016 Ryder Cup captain, is close to McIlroy and rates himself as one of his biggest supporters. But after watching him crash out here for a depressing hat-trick of missed cuts on 10-over, he was courageous enough to state what he believes is wrong. To McGinley, the golfing landscape has radically changed since McIlroy introduced himself as the heir to Tiger Woods at the start of the decade and he needs to rededicate himself to the challenge. McGinley craves to witness the old McIlroy, with those “pointy elbows” which pushed aside his rivals and as he takes his miserable downtime before reappearing on Thursday at the Travelers Championship – where he will look for just his second victory of any description in 20 months – he could do far worse than digest the comments. Yes his friend recognises that this campaign has been far from a disastrous one thus far – with a win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March, as well as a fifth at the Masters and two runners-up, including at the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth three months ago – but McGinley cannot help but feel McIlroy’s bar must be set somewhat higher. McIlroy alongside Jordan Spieth in Southampton, N.Y. Credit: AP “There are definitely issues that need to be addressed,” McGinley said. “But I certainly don’t see it as technical. People say about his putting but from what we saw at Bay Hill [in Orlando, where he won in March] he is an inspirational putter and he’s always been. I think it’s more to do with attitude and the second phase of his career. In his first phase we have a saying in Ireland that he had ‘pointy elbows’ – ‘get out of my way, here I come, just watch me, I’m going to dominate’. “That doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. I know the competition has got better but that attitude of Rory’s, bouncing down the fairways and just steamrollering the field, we haven’t seen in a while. Yeah, he won at Bay Hill this year, but he won from getting into contention in the last four or five holes and then having a flurry of birdies to get over the line. That’s what we want to see back, that’s when Rory is at his best. When he has those pointy elbows and he’s bouncing down the fairways and he’s dominating.” But how to get there? McGinley, who is here on Long Island working for Sky, believes he must look forwards for the answers and not backwards and as the 29-year-old stands at the crossroads of a career which boasts four majors, but none in the last four years, McGinley feels the necessity for a fresh attitude and the “drive” to learn how to tackle the more arduous challenges. McIlroy talks with his caddie Harry Diamond Credit: GETTY IMAGES “He’s not the new kid on the block anymore,” McGinley said. “When he was winning his major championships, the last of which was four years ago, he was out on his own, he drove the ball better than anyone else. But now there are four, five six guys who can drive as long and as straight as him. “He’s made a lot of money in the last number of years, won his tournaments and has a big CV and is well known around the world. This is a new phase of his career and it’s going to take a new attitude and a new drive to go with it. That’s what missing. “The second thing that is missing is his ability to play tough courses. His CV is littered with success, but it’s not littered with success on brutally tough golf courses, war of attrition type courses, like the one he was presented with here. Those issues need to be addressed for Rory if he is continue on the [trend of the] tremendous early part of his career.” Of course, McIlroy has already won America’s national championship but that was in 2011 on the saturated Congressional course in Washington, which presented a benign test as far removed from Shinnecock Hills as can be imagined. Nevertheless, McIlroy claimed he was ready for this examination. It is just that the syllabus changed when the 30mph gusts came in during Thursday’s first round. McIlroy after winning the US Open back in 2011 Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Those conditions took me by surprise and that is what really got me,” McIlroy said. “The conditions were a lot better [on Friday] and I played well – the way I have been playing in decent conditions recently. “It feels like the last three years I have only had three Majors to target and this one has been a write-off! Every time you come in to a US Open you know it’s going to be tough. I showed glimpses of the good form but I just wish I had handled the conditions better in the first round. “I felt my game was in good shape – I felt the long game was there; the short game was there. I felt like I didn’t hit that bad shots [in his 80] – I just wasn’t prepared for those conditions.” The truth is, McIlroy actually was on the easier side of the starting sheets. The average round for those drawn early-late was roughly 74.5 while the average for the late-early wave was 75.6. It was more than a shot advantage but still McIlroy found himself 14 behind world No 1 Dustin Johnson, who built up his four-shot halfway advantage from the unfortunate half. McIlroy’s reservations about “tough conditions” hardly bode well for The Open in five weeks’ time. Carnoustie is definitely the hardest course on the Open rota and, if Mother Nature is feeling malicious, can even be classed as the most demanding of all the major venues. Before then he tackles what is likely to be a generous set-up in Connecticut, before the Irish Open, which he promotes at Ballyliffin. On the rugged links at the tip of Co Donegal it will all get serious again.
For the third time in as many years, Rory McIlroy is on his sofa watching the weekend action from the US Open instead of being involved. Yet while the Ulsterman joked, “I have only had three majors to target”, Paul McGinley believes there are “issues to be addressed”. McGinley, the 2016 Ryder Cup captain, is close to McIlroy and rates himself as one of his biggest supporters. But after watching him crash out here for a depressing hat-trick of missed cuts on 10-over, he was courageous enough to state what he believes is wrong. To McGinley, the golfing landscape has radically changed since McIlroy introduced himself as the heir to Tiger Woods at the start of the decade and he needs to rededicate himself to the challenge. McGinley craves to witness the old McIlroy, with those “pointy elbows” which pushed aside his rivals and as he takes his miserable downtime before reappearing on Thursday at the Travelers Championship – where he will look for just his second victory of any description in 20 months – he could do far worse than digest the comments. Yes his friend recognises that this campaign has been far from a disastrous one thus far – with a win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March, as well as a fifth at the Masters and two runners-up, including at the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth three months ago – but McGinley cannot help but feel McIlroy’s bar must be set somewhat higher. McIlroy alongside Jordan Spieth in Southampton, N.Y. Credit: AP “There are definitely issues that need to be addressed,” McGinley said. “But I certainly don’t see it as technical. People say about his putting but from what we saw at Bay Hill [in Orlando, where he won in March] he is an inspirational putter and he’s always been. I think it’s more to do with attitude and the second phase of his career. In his first phase we have a saying in Ireland that he had ‘pointy elbows’ – ‘get out of my way, here I come, just watch me, I’m going to dominate’. “That doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. I know the competition has got better but that attitude of Rory’s, bouncing down the fairways and just steamrollering the field, we haven’t seen in a while. Yeah, he won at Bay Hill this year, but he won from getting into contention in the last four or five holes and then having a flurry of birdies to get over the line. That’s what we want to see back, that’s when Rory is at his best. When he has those pointy elbows and he’s bouncing down the fairways and he’s dominating.” But how to get there? McGinley, who is here on Long Island working for Sky, believes he must look forwards for the answers and not backwards and as the 29-year-old stands at the crossroads of a career which boasts four majors, but none in the last four years, McGinley feels the necessity for a fresh attitude and the “drive” to learn how to tackle the more arduous challenges. McIlroy talks with his caddie Harry Diamond Credit: GETTY IMAGES “He’s not the new kid on the block anymore,” McGinley said. “When he was winning his major championships, the last of which was four years ago, he was out on his own, he drove the ball better than anyone else. But now there are four, five six guys who can drive as long and as straight as him. “He’s made a lot of money in the last number of years, won his tournaments and has a big CV and is well known around the world. This is a new phase of his career and it’s going to take a new attitude and a new drive to go with it. That’s what missing. “The second thing that is missing is his ability to play tough courses. His CV is littered with success, but it’s not littered with success on brutally tough golf courses, war of attrition type courses, like the one he was presented with here. Those issues need to be addressed for Rory if he is continue on the [trend of the] tremendous early part of his career.” Of course, McIlroy has already won America’s national championship but that was in 2011 on the saturated Congressional course in Washington, which presented a benign test as far removed from Shinnecock Hills as can be imagined. Nevertheless, McIlroy claimed he was ready for this examination. It is just that the syllabus changed when the 30mph gusts came in during Thursday’s first round. McIlroy after winning the US Open back in 2011 Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Those conditions took me by surprise and that is what really got me,” McIlroy said. “The conditions were a lot better [on Friday] and I played well – the way I have been playing in decent conditions recently. “It feels like the last three years I have only had three Majors to target and this one has been a write-off! Every time you come in to a US Open you know it’s going to be tough. I showed glimpses of the good form but I just wish I had handled the conditions better in the first round. “I felt my game was in good shape – I felt the long game was there; the short game was there. I felt like I didn’t hit that bad shots [in his 80] – I just wasn’t prepared for those conditions.” The truth is, McIlroy actually was on the easier side of the starting sheets. The average round for those drawn early-late was roughly 74.5 while the average for the late-early wave was 75.6. It was more than a shot advantage but still McIlroy found himself 14 behind world No 1 Dustin Johnson, who built up his four-shot halfway advantage from the unfortunate half. McIlroy’s reservations about “tough conditions” hardly bode well for The Open in five weeks’ time. Carnoustie is definitely the hardest course on the Open rota and, if Mother Nature is feeling malicious, can even be classed as the most demanding of all the major venues. Before then he tackles what is likely to be a generous set-up in Connecticut, before the Irish Open, which he promotes at Ballyliffin. On the rugged links at the tip of Co Donegal it will all get serious again.
Rory McIlroy must rediscover his 'pointy elbows' as he enters a new phase of his career
For the third time in as many years, Rory McIlroy is on his sofa watching the weekend action from the US Open instead of being involved. Yet while the Ulsterman joked, “I have only had three majors to target”, Paul McGinley believes there are “issues to be addressed”. McGinley, the 2016 Ryder Cup captain, is close to McIlroy and rates himself as one of his biggest supporters. But after watching him crash out here for a depressing hat-trick of missed cuts on 10-over, he was courageous enough to state what he believes is wrong. To McGinley, the golfing landscape has radically changed since McIlroy introduced himself as the heir to Tiger Woods at the start of the decade and he needs to rededicate himself to the challenge. McGinley craves to witness the old McIlroy, with those “pointy elbows” which pushed aside his rivals and as he takes his miserable downtime before reappearing on Thursday at the Travelers Championship – where he will look for just his second victory of any description in 20 months – he could do far worse than digest the comments. Yes his friend recognises that this campaign has been far from a disastrous one thus far – with a win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March, as well as a fifth at the Masters and two runners-up, including at the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth three months ago – but McGinley cannot help but feel McIlroy’s bar must be set somewhat higher. McIlroy alongside Jordan Spieth in Southampton, N.Y. Credit: AP “There are definitely issues that need to be addressed,” McGinley said. “But I certainly don’t see it as technical. People say about his putting but from what we saw at Bay Hill [in Orlando, where he won in March] he is an inspirational putter and he’s always been. I think it’s more to do with attitude and the second phase of his career. In his first phase we have a saying in Ireland that he had ‘pointy elbows’ – ‘get out of my way, here I come, just watch me, I’m going to dominate’. “That doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. I know the competition has got better but that attitude of Rory’s, bouncing down the fairways and just steamrollering the field, we haven’t seen in a while. Yeah, he won at Bay Hill this year, but he won from getting into contention in the last four or five holes and then having a flurry of birdies to get over the line. That’s what we want to see back, that’s when Rory is at his best. When he has those pointy elbows and he’s bouncing down the fairways and he’s dominating.” But how to get there? McGinley, who is here on Long Island working for Sky, believes he must look forwards for the answers and not backwards and as the 29-year-old stands at the crossroads of a career which boasts four majors, but none in the last four years, McGinley feels the necessity for a fresh attitude and the “drive” to learn how to tackle the more arduous challenges. McIlroy talks with his caddie Harry Diamond Credit: GETTY IMAGES “He’s not the new kid on the block anymore,” McGinley said. “When he was winning his major championships, the last of which was four years ago, he was out on his own, he drove the ball better than anyone else. But now there are four, five six guys who can drive as long and as straight as him. “He’s made a lot of money in the last number of years, won his tournaments and has a big CV and is well known around the world. This is a new phase of his career and it’s going to take a new attitude and a new drive to go with it. That’s what missing. “The second thing that is missing is his ability to play tough courses. His CV is littered with success, but it’s not littered with success on brutally tough golf courses, war of attrition type courses, like the one he was presented with here. Those issues need to be addressed for Rory if he is continue on the [trend of the] tremendous early part of his career.” Of course, McIlroy has already won America’s national championship but that was in 2011 on the saturated Congressional course in Washington, which presented a benign test as far removed from Shinnecock Hills as can be imagined. Nevertheless, McIlroy claimed he was ready for this examination. It is just that the syllabus changed when the 30mph gusts came in during Thursday’s first round. McIlroy after winning the US Open back in 2011 Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Those conditions took me by surprise and that is what really got me,” McIlroy said. “The conditions were a lot better [on Friday] and I played well – the way I have been playing in decent conditions recently. “It feels like the last three years I have only had three Majors to target and this one has been a write-off! Every time you come in to a US Open you know it’s going to be tough. I showed glimpses of the good form but I just wish I had handled the conditions better in the first round. “I felt my game was in good shape – I felt the long game was there; the short game was there. I felt like I didn’t hit that bad shots [in his 80] – I just wasn’t prepared for those conditions.” The truth is, McIlroy actually was on the easier side of the starting sheets. The average round for those drawn early-late was roughly 74.5 while the average for the late-early wave was 75.6. It was more than a shot advantage but still McIlroy found himself 14 behind world No 1 Dustin Johnson, who built up his four-shot halfway advantage from the unfortunate half. McIlroy’s reservations about “tough conditions” hardly bode well for The Open in five weeks’ time. Carnoustie is definitely the hardest course on the Open rota and, if Mother Nature is feeling malicious, can even be classed as the most demanding of all the major venues. Before then he tackles what is likely to be a generous set-up in Connecticut, before the Irish Open, which he promotes at Ballyliffin. On the rugged links at the tip of Co Donegal it will all get serious again.
For the third time in as many years, Rory McIlroy is on his sofa watching the weekend action from the US Open instead of being involved. Yet while the Ulsterman joked, “I have only had three majors to target”, Paul McGinley believes there are “issues to be addressed”. McGinley, the 2016 Ryder Cup captain, is close to McIlroy and rates himself as one of his biggest supporters. But after watching him crash out here for a depressing hat-trick of missed cuts on 10-over, he was courageous enough to state what he believes is wrong. To McGinley, the golfing landscape has radically changed since McIlroy introduced himself as the heir to Tiger Woods at the start of the decade and he needs to rededicate himself to the challenge. McGinley craves to witness the old McIlroy, with those “pointy elbows” which pushed aside his rivals and as he takes his miserable downtime before reappearing on Thursday at the Travelers Championship – where he will look for just his second victory of any description in 20 months – he could do far worse than digest the comments. Yes his friend recognises that this campaign has been far from a disastrous one thus far – with a win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March, as well as a fifth at the Masters and two runners-up, including at the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth three months ago – but McGinley cannot help but feel McIlroy’s bar must be set somewhat higher. McIlroy alongside Jordan Spieth in Southampton, N.Y. Credit: AP “There are definitely issues that need to be addressed,” McGinley said. “But I certainly don’t see it as technical. People say about his putting but from what we saw at Bay Hill [in Orlando, where he won in March] he is an inspirational putter and he’s always been. I think it’s more to do with attitude and the second phase of his career. In his first phase we have a saying in Ireland that he had ‘pointy elbows’ – ‘get out of my way, here I come, just watch me, I’m going to dominate’. “That doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. I know the competition has got better but that attitude of Rory’s, bouncing down the fairways and just steamrollering the field, we haven’t seen in a while. Yeah, he won at Bay Hill this year, but he won from getting into contention in the last four or five holes and then having a flurry of birdies to get over the line. That’s what we want to see back, that’s when Rory is at his best. When he has those pointy elbows and he’s bouncing down the fairways and he’s dominating.” But how to get there? McGinley, who is here on Long Island working for Sky, believes he must look forwards for the answers and not backwards and as the 29-year-old stands at the crossroads of a career which boasts four majors, but none in the last four years, McGinley feels the necessity for a fresh attitude and the “drive” to learn how to tackle the more arduous challenges. McIlroy talks with his caddie Harry Diamond Credit: GETTY IMAGES “He’s not the new kid on the block anymore,” McGinley said. “When he was winning his major championships, the last of which was four years ago, he was out on his own, he drove the ball better than anyone else. But now there are four, five six guys who can drive as long and as straight as him. “He’s made a lot of money in the last number of years, won his tournaments and has a big CV and is well known around the world. This is a new phase of his career and it’s going to take a new attitude and a new drive to go with it. That’s what missing. “The second thing that is missing is his ability to play tough courses. His CV is littered with success, but it’s not littered with success on brutally tough golf courses, war of attrition type courses, like the one he was presented with here. Those issues need to be addressed for Rory if he is continue on the [trend of the] tremendous early part of his career.” Of course, McIlroy has already won America’s national championship but that was in 2011 on the saturated Congressional course in Washington, which presented a benign test as far removed from Shinnecock Hills as can be imagined. Nevertheless, McIlroy claimed he was ready for this examination. It is just that the syllabus changed when the 30mph gusts came in during Thursday’s first round. McIlroy after winning the US Open back in 2011 Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Those conditions took me by surprise and that is what really got me,” McIlroy said. “The conditions were a lot better [on Friday] and I played well – the way I have been playing in decent conditions recently. “It feels like the last three years I have only had three Majors to target and this one has been a write-off! Every time you come in to a US Open you know it’s going to be tough. I showed glimpses of the good form but I just wish I had handled the conditions better in the first round. “I felt my game was in good shape – I felt the long game was there; the short game was there. I felt like I didn’t hit that bad shots [in his 80] – I just wasn’t prepared for those conditions.” The truth is, McIlroy actually was on the easier side of the starting sheets. The average round for those drawn early-late was roughly 74.5 while the average for the late-early wave was 75.6. It was more than a shot advantage but still McIlroy found himself 14 behind world No 1 Dustin Johnson, who built up his four-shot halfway advantage from the unfortunate half. McIlroy’s reservations about “tough conditions” hardly bode well for The Open in five weeks’ time. Carnoustie is definitely the hardest course on the Open rota and, if Mother Nature is feeling malicious, can even be classed as the most demanding of all the major venues. Before then he tackles what is likely to be a generous set-up in Connecticut, before the Irish Open, which he promotes at Ballyliffin. On the rugged links at the tip of Co Donegal it will all get serious again.
Rory McIlroy must rediscover his 'pointy elbows' as he enters a new phase of his career
For the third time in as many years, Rory McIlroy is on his sofa watching the weekend action from the US Open instead of being involved. Yet while the Ulsterman joked, “I have only had three majors to target”, Paul McGinley believes there are “issues to be addressed”. McGinley, the 2016 Ryder Cup captain, is close to McIlroy and rates himself as one of his biggest supporters. But after watching him crash out here for a depressing hat-trick of missed cuts on 10-over, he was courageous enough to state what he believes is wrong. To McGinley, the golfing landscape has radically changed since McIlroy introduced himself as the heir to Tiger Woods at the start of the decade and he needs to rededicate himself to the challenge. McGinley craves to witness the old McIlroy, with those “pointy elbows” which pushed aside his rivals and as he takes his miserable downtime before reappearing on Thursday at the Travelers Championship – where he will look for just his second victory of any description in 20 months – he could do far worse than digest the comments. Yes his friend recognises that this campaign has been far from a disastrous one thus far – with a win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March, as well as a fifth at the Masters and two runners-up, including at the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth three months ago – but McGinley cannot help but feel McIlroy’s bar must be set somewhat higher. McIlroy alongside Jordan Spieth in Southampton, N.Y. Credit: AP “There are definitely issues that need to be addressed,” McGinley said. “But I certainly don’t see it as technical. People say about his putting but from what we saw at Bay Hill [in Orlando, where he won in March] he is an inspirational putter and he’s always been. I think it’s more to do with attitude and the second phase of his career. In his first phase we have a saying in Ireland that he had ‘pointy elbows’ – ‘get out of my way, here I come, just watch me, I’m going to dominate’. “That doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. I know the competition has got better but that attitude of Rory’s, bouncing down the fairways and just steamrollering the field, we haven’t seen in a while. Yeah, he won at Bay Hill this year, but he won from getting into contention in the last four or five holes and then having a flurry of birdies to get over the line. That’s what we want to see back, that’s when Rory is at his best. When he has those pointy elbows and he’s bouncing down the fairways and he’s dominating.” But how to get there? McGinley, who is here on Long Island working for Sky, believes he must look forwards for the answers and not backwards and as the 29-year-old stands at the crossroads of a career which boasts four majors, but none in the last four years, McGinley feels the necessity for a fresh attitude and the “drive” to learn how to tackle the more arduous challenges. McIlroy talks with his caddie Harry Diamond Credit: GETTY IMAGES “He’s not the new kid on the block anymore,” McGinley said. “When he was winning his major championships, the last of which was four years ago, he was out on his own, he drove the ball better than anyone else. But now there are four, five six guys who can drive as long and as straight as him. “He’s made a lot of money in the last number of years, won his tournaments and has a big CV and is well known around the world. This is a new phase of his career and it’s going to take a new attitude and a new drive to go with it. That’s what missing. “The second thing that is missing is his ability to play tough courses. His CV is littered with success, but it’s not littered with success on brutally tough golf courses, war of attrition type courses, like the one he was presented with here. Those issues need to be addressed for Rory if he is continue on the [trend of the] tremendous early part of his career.” Of course, McIlroy has already won America’s national championship but that was in 2011 on the saturated Congressional course in Washington, which presented a benign test as far removed from Shinnecock Hills as can be imagined. Nevertheless, McIlroy claimed he was ready for this examination. It is just that the syllabus changed when the 30mph gusts came in during Thursday’s first round. McIlroy after winning the US Open back in 2011 Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Those conditions took me by surprise and that is what really got me,” McIlroy said. “The conditions were a lot better [on Friday] and I played well – the way I have been playing in decent conditions recently. “It feels like the last three years I have only had three Majors to target and this one has been a write-off! Every time you come in to a US Open you know it’s going to be tough. I showed glimpses of the good form but I just wish I had handled the conditions better in the first round. “I felt my game was in good shape – I felt the long game was there; the short game was there. I felt like I didn’t hit that bad shots [in his 80] – I just wasn’t prepared for those conditions.” The truth is, McIlroy actually was on the easier side of the starting sheets. The average round for those drawn early-late was roughly 74.5 while the average for the late-early wave was 75.6. It was more than a shot advantage but still McIlroy found himself 14 behind world No 1 Dustin Johnson, who built up his four-shot halfway advantage from the unfortunate half. McIlroy’s reservations about “tough conditions” hardly bode well for The Open in five weeks’ time. Carnoustie is definitely the hardest course on the Open rota and, if Mother Nature is feeling malicious, can even be classed as the most demanding of all the major venues. Before then he tackles what is likely to be a generous set-up in Connecticut, before the Irish Open, which he promotes at Ballyliffin. On the rugged links at the tip of Co Donegal it will all get serious again.
For the third time in as many years, Rory McIlroy is on his sofa watching the weekend action from the US Open instead of being involved. Yet while the Ulsterman joked, “I have only had three majors to target”, Paul McGinley believes there are “issues to be addressed”. McGinley, the 2016 Ryder Cup captain, is close to McIlroy and rates himself as one of his biggest supporters. But after watching him crash out here for a depressing hat-trick of missed cuts on 10-over, he was courageous enough to state what he believes is wrong. To McGinley, the golfing landscape has radically changed since McIlroy introduced himself as the heir to Tiger Woods at the start of the decade and he needs to rededicate himself to the challenge. McGinley craves to witness the old McIlroy, with those “pointy elbows” which pushed aside his rivals and as he takes his miserable downtime before reappearing on Thursday at the Travelers Championship – where he will look for just his second victory of any description in 20 months – he could do far worse than digest the comments. Yes his friend recognises that this campaign has been far from a disastrous one thus far – with a win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March, as well as a fifth at the Masters and two runners-up, including at the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth three months ago – but McGinley cannot help but feel McIlroy’s bar must be set somewhat higher. McIlroy alongside Jordan Spieth in Southampton, N.Y. Credit: AP “There are definitely issues that need to be addressed,” McGinley said. “But I certainly don’t see it as technical. People say about his putting but from what we saw at Bay Hill [in Orlando, where he won in March] he is an inspirational putter and he’s always been. I think it’s more to do with attitude and the second phase of his career. In his first phase we have a saying in Ireland that he had ‘pointy elbows’ – ‘get out of my way, here I come, just watch me, I’m going to dominate’. “That doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. I know the competition has got better but that attitude of Rory’s, bouncing down the fairways and just steamrollering the field, we haven’t seen in a while. Yeah, he won at Bay Hill this year, but he won from getting into contention in the last four or five holes and then having a flurry of birdies to get over the line. That’s what we want to see back, that’s when Rory is at his best. When he has those pointy elbows and he’s bouncing down the fairways and he’s dominating.” But how to get there? McGinley, who is here on Long Island working for Sky, believes he must look forwards for the answers and not backwards and as the 29-year-old stands at the crossroads of a career which boasts four majors, but none in the last four years, McGinley feels the necessity for a fresh attitude and the “drive” to learn how to tackle the more arduous challenges. McIlroy talks with his caddie Harry Diamond Credit: GETTY IMAGES “He’s not the new kid on the block anymore,” McGinley said. “When he was winning his major championships, the last of which was four years ago, he was out on his own, he drove the ball better than anyone else. But now there are four, five six guys who can drive as long and as straight as him. “He’s made a lot of money in the last number of years, won his tournaments and has a big CV and is well known around the world. This is a new phase of his career and it’s going to take a new attitude and a new drive to go with it. That’s what missing. “The second thing that is missing is his ability to play tough courses. His CV is littered with success, but it’s not littered with success on brutally tough golf courses, war of attrition type courses, like the one he was presented with here. Those issues need to be addressed for Rory if he is continue on the [trend of the] tremendous early part of his career.” Of course, McIlroy has already won America’s national championship but that was in 2011 on the saturated Congressional course in Washington, which presented a benign test as far removed from Shinnecock Hills as can be imagined. Nevertheless, McIlroy claimed he was ready for this examination. It is just that the syllabus changed when the 30mph gusts came in during Thursday’s first round. McIlroy after winning the US Open back in 2011 Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Those conditions took me by surprise and that is what really got me,” McIlroy said. “The conditions were a lot better [on Friday] and I played well – the way I have been playing in decent conditions recently. “It feels like the last three years I have only had three Majors to target and this one has been a write-off! Every time you come in to a US Open you know it’s going to be tough. I showed glimpses of the good form but I just wish I had handled the conditions better in the first round. “I felt my game was in good shape – I felt the long game was there; the short game was there. I felt like I didn’t hit that bad shots [in his 80] – I just wasn’t prepared for those conditions.” The truth is, McIlroy actually was on the easier side of the starting sheets. The average round for those drawn early-late was roughly 74.5 while the average for the late-early wave was 75.6. It was more than a shot advantage but still McIlroy found himself 14 behind world No 1 Dustin Johnson, who built up his four-shot halfway advantage from the unfortunate half. McIlroy’s reservations about “tough conditions” hardly bode well for The Open in five weeks’ time. Carnoustie is definitely the hardest course on the Open rota and, if Mother Nature is feeling malicious, can even be classed as the most demanding of all the major venues. Before then he tackles what is likely to be a generous set-up in Connecticut, before the Irish Open, which he promotes at Ballyliffin. On the rugged links at the tip of Co Donegal it will all get serious again.
Rory McIlroy must rediscover his 'pointy elbows' as he enters a new phase of his career
For the third time in as many years, Rory McIlroy is on his sofa watching the weekend action from the US Open instead of being involved. Yet while the Ulsterman joked, “I have only had three majors to target”, Paul McGinley believes there are “issues to be addressed”. McGinley, the 2016 Ryder Cup captain, is close to McIlroy and rates himself as one of his biggest supporters. But after watching him crash out here for a depressing hat-trick of missed cuts on 10-over, he was courageous enough to state what he believes is wrong. To McGinley, the golfing landscape has radically changed since McIlroy introduced himself as the heir to Tiger Woods at the start of the decade and he needs to rededicate himself to the challenge. McGinley craves to witness the old McIlroy, with those “pointy elbows” which pushed aside his rivals and as he takes his miserable downtime before reappearing on Thursday at the Travelers Championship – where he will look for just his second victory of any description in 20 months – he could do far worse than digest the comments. Yes his friend recognises that this campaign has been far from a disastrous one thus far – with a win at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March, as well as a fifth at the Masters and two runners-up, including at the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth three months ago – but McGinley cannot help but feel McIlroy’s bar must be set somewhat higher. McIlroy alongside Jordan Spieth in Southampton, N.Y. Credit: AP “There are definitely issues that need to be addressed,” McGinley said. “But I certainly don’t see it as technical. People say about his putting but from what we saw at Bay Hill [in Orlando, where he won in March] he is an inspirational putter and he’s always been. I think it’s more to do with attitude and the second phase of his career. In his first phase we have a saying in Ireland that he had ‘pointy elbows’ – ‘get out of my way, here I come, just watch me, I’m going to dominate’. “That doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. I know the competition has got better but that attitude of Rory’s, bouncing down the fairways and just steamrollering the field, we haven’t seen in a while. Yeah, he won at Bay Hill this year, but he won from getting into contention in the last four or five holes and then having a flurry of birdies to get over the line. That’s what we want to see back, that’s when Rory is at his best. When he has those pointy elbows and he’s bouncing down the fairways and he’s dominating.” But how to get there? McGinley, who is here on Long Island working for Sky, believes he must look forwards for the answers and not backwards and as the 29-year-old stands at the crossroads of a career which boasts four majors, but none in the last four years, McGinley feels the necessity for a fresh attitude and the “drive” to learn how to tackle the more arduous challenges. McIlroy talks with his caddie Harry Diamond Credit: GETTY IMAGES “He’s not the new kid on the block anymore,” McGinley said. “When he was winning his major championships, the last of which was four years ago, he was out on his own, he drove the ball better than anyone else. But now there are four, five six guys who can drive as long and as straight as him. “He’s made a lot of money in the last number of years, won his tournaments and has a big CV and is well known around the world. This is a new phase of his career and it’s going to take a new attitude and a new drive to go with it. That’s what missing. “The second thing that is missing is his ability to play tough courses. His CV is littered with success, but it’s not littered with success on brutally tough golf courses, war of attrition type courses, like the one he was presented with here. Those issues need to be addressed for Rory if he is continue on the [trend of the] tremendous early part of his career.” Of course, McIlroy has already won America’s national championship but that was in 2011 on the saturated Congressional course in Washington, which presented a benign test as far removed from Shinnecock Hills as can be imagined. Nevertheless, McIlroy claimed he was ready for this examination. It is just that the syllabus changed when the 30mph gusts came in during Thursday’s first round. McIlroy after winning the US Open back in 2011 Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Those conditions took me by surprise and that is what really got me,” McIlroy said. “The conditions were a lot better [on Friday] and I played well – the way I have been playing in decent conditions recently. “It feels like the last three years I have only had three Majors to target and this one has been a write-off! Every time you come in to a US Open you know it’s going to be tough. I showed glimpses of the good form but I just wish I had handled the conditions better in the first round. “I felt my game was in good shape – I felt the long game was there; the short game was there. I felt like I didn’t hit that bad shots [in his 80] – I just wasn’t prepared for those conditions.” The truth is, McIlroy actually was on the easier side of the starting sheets. The average round for those drawn early-late was roughly 74.5 while the average for the late-early wave was 75.6. It was more than a shot advantage but still McIlroy found himself 14 behind world No 1 Dustin Johnson, who built up his four-shot halfway advantage from the unfortunate half. McIlroy’s reservations about “tough conditions” hardly bode well for The Open in five weeks’ time. Carnoustie is definitely the hardest course on the Open rota and, if Mother Nature is feeling malicious, can even be classed as the most demanding of all the major venues. Before then he tackles what is likely to be a generous set-up in Connecticut, before the Irish Open, which he promotes at Ballyliffin. On the rugged links at the tip of Co Donegal it will all get serious again.
Tiger Woods was among the stars to miss the cut at the U.S. Open, but Dustin Johnson continued to deliver at Shinnecock Hills.
Tiger in awe of in-form Johnson at U.S. Open
Tiger Woods was among the stars to miss the cut at the U.S. Open, but Dustin Johnson continued to deliver at Shinnecock Hills.
Jun 15, 2018; Southampton, NY, USA; Tiger Woods walks through the rough to the ninth green during the second round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Shinnecock Hills GC - Shinnecock Hills Golf C. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports
PGA: U.S. Open - Second Round
Jun 15, 2018; Southampton, NY, USA; Tiger Woods walks through the rough to the ninth green during the second round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Shinnecock Hills GC - Shinnecock Hills Golf C. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports
Jun 15, 2018; Southampton, NY, USA; Tiger Woods walks through the rough to the ninth green during the second round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Shinnecock Hills GC - Shinnecock Hills Golf C. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports
PGA: U.S. Open - Second Round
Jun 15, 2018; Southampton, NY, USA; Tiger Woods walks through the rough to the ninth green during the second round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Shinnecock Hills GC - Shinnecock Hills Golf C. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports
Jun 15, 2018; Southampton, NY, USA; Tiger Woods tees off the second hole during the second round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Shinnecock Hills GC - Shinnecock Hills Golf C. Mandatory Credit: Dennis Schneidler-USA TODAY Sports
PGA: U.S. Open - Second Round
Jun 15, 2018; Southampton, NY, USA; Tiger Woods tees off the second hole during the second round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Shinnecock Hills GC - Shinnecock Hills Golf C. Mandatory Credit: Dennis Schneidler-USA TODAY Sports
Three-time US Open winner Tiger Woods says that Dustin Johnson looks to be in complete control at Shinnecock Hills, despite the tough on-course conditions
Dustin is in complete control - Woods
Three-time US Open winner Tiger Woods says that Dustin Johnson looks to be in complete control at Shinnecock Hills, despite the tough on-course conditions
Three-time US Open winner Tiger Woods says that Dustin Johnson looks to be in complete control at Shinnecock Hills, despite the tough on-course conditions
Dustin is in complete control - Woods
Three-time US Open winner Tiger Woods says that Dustin Johnson looks to be in complete control at Shinnecock Hills, despite the tough on-course conditions
Three-time US Open winner Tiger Woods says that Dustin Johnson looks to be in complete control at Shinnecock Hills, despite the tough on-course conditions
Dustin is in complete control - Woods
Three-time US Open winner Tiger Woods says that Dustin Johnson looks to be in complete control at Shinnecock Hills, despite the tough on-course conditions
Tiger Woods won his 14th and most recent major at the 2008 US Open.
On This Day - Tiger Woods wins 2008 US Open
Tiger Woods won his 14th and most recent major at the 2008 US Open.
Tiger Woods won his 14th and most recent major at the 2008 US Open.
On This Day - Tiger Woods wins 2008 US Open
Tiger Woods won his 14th and most recent major at the 2008 US Open.
Tiger Woods won his 14th and most recent major at the 2008 US Open.
On This Day - Tiger Woods wins 2008 US Open
Tiger Woods won his 14th and most recent major at the 2008 US Open.
A Massachusetts firefighter and two other amateurs did what Rory McIlroy and Tiger Woods couldn't - make the cut in the U.S. Open.
Firefighter among three ams to make the cut
A Massachusetts firefighter and two other amateurs did what Rory McIlroy and Tiger Woods couldn't - make the cut in the U.S. Open.
Shinnecock Hills took a toll on the game’s best and brightest this week, as four of the world’s top 10 players - plus Tiger Woods - missed the cut.
Big names, big numbers: Stars miss the cut
Shinnecock Hills took a toll on the game’s best and brightest this week, as four of the world’s top 10 players - plus Tiger Woods - missed the cut.
Tiger Woods reflects on missing the cut at the US Open
Putting bad, swing good says departing Woods
Tiger Woods reflects on missing the cut at the US Open
Tiger Woods reflects on missing the cut at the US Open
Putting bad, swing good says departing Woods
Tiger Woods reflects on missing the cut at the US Open
Tiger Woods reflects on missing the cut at the US Open
Putting bad, swing good says departing Woods
Tiger Woods reflects on missing the cut at the US Open
Tiger Woods reacts after missing a putt on the first green during the second round of the U.S. Open Golf Championship, Friday, June 15, 2018, in Southampton, N.Y. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Johnson takes 4-shot lead into weekend at US Open
Tiger Woods reacts after missing a putt on the first green during the second round of the U.S. Open Golf Championship, Friday, June 15, 2018, in Southampton, N.Y. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

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