Tiger Woods

Tiger Woods returns to golf

After spending the first two rounds of the Genesis Open in a group with Tiger Woods, Justin Thomas spoke out against 'completely unacceptable' crowd behavior.
Thomas: Raucus crowds becoming 'completely unacceptable'
After spending the first two rounds of the Genesis Open in a group with Tiger Woods, Justin Thomas spoke out against 'completely unacceptable' crowd behavior.
Rory McIlroy has rounded on the overly enthusiastic golf fans and claimed Tiger Woods is operating at a “two-shot disadvantage” to the rest of the field because of the “circus” which surrounds his competitive appearances. McIlroy played with Woods as the 42-year-old missed the cut here at the Genesis Open and expressed his sympathy. The Ulsterman hopes that the distracting clamour is a“novelty” because this was only Woods’ second performance in more than a year after back surgery. “It might always have been like this like the whole Tiger mania and these dudes, but I swear, playing in front of all that, he gives up half a shot a day on the field,” McIlroy said. “Like it's two shots a tournament he has to give because of all that that goes on around. So whether that calms down the more he plays and it doesn't become such a novelty that he's back out playing again I don’t know. But it's tiring. I need a couple Advil. I've got a headache after all that.” When asked to elaborate, McIlroy said: “You've got a six-foot putt and they’ll shout "It doesn't break as much as you think," just stuff like that - stuff they don't have to say. Whoever is teeing off at 8:30 in the morning doesn't get that and can just go about his business and do his thing. That's tough. Tiger has to deal with that every single time he goes out to play.” Woods (R) agreed with McIlroy's assessment Credit: Getty Images Woods concurred with McIlroy, claiming that he would have even more than his 106 professional wins otherwise. “It's cost me a lot of shots over the years,” he said. “And it's been a lot because all it takes is one shot on a Thursday and you lose the tournament by a shot on Sunday. What people don't realise, it's not just something that happens on Sunday afternoon - this is cumulative and it's par for the course. But I've dealt with it for a very long time.” Woods was not despondent with his 72-76 performance for a six-over total and insisted he has lowered his expectations after his spinal fusion operation last year. At the 11th hour, he has entered the Honda Classic, which starts near to his home in West Palm beach on Thursday. “I haven't played golf in years, but I'm starting to come back and it's going to take a little time,” he said. “I’m progressing and starting to get a feel for tournament golf again. I just need to clean up my rounds.” McIlroy will also be in that Florida field and after a disappointing two-over 73 in the third round here, he will almost certainly still be looking for his first win in 17 months. There were three birdies , but three bogeys and a double-bogey on the 12th as he fell back to level par. England’s Tommy Fleetwood shot his own 73 and is on one-over in his first official event as a PGA Tour member.
Rory McIlroy turns on fans and says 'circus' around Tiger Woods puts American at 'two-shot disadvantage'
Rory McIlroy has rounded on the overly enthusiastic golf fans and claimed Tiger Woods is operating at a “two-shot disadvantage” to the rest of the field because of the “circus” which surrounds his competitive appearances. McIlroy played with Woods as the 42-year-old missed the cut here at the Genesis Open and expressed his sympathy. The Ulsterman hopes that the distracting clamour is a“novelty” because this was only Woods’ second performance in more than a year after back surgery. “It might always have been like this like the whole Tiger mania and these dudes, but I swear, playing in front of all that, he gives up half a shot a day on the field,” McIlroy said. “Like it's two shots a tournament he has to give because of all that that goes on around. So whether that calms down the more he plays and it doesn't become such a novelty that he's back out playing again I don’t know. But it's tiring. I need a couple Advil. I've got a headache after all that.” When asked to elaborate, McIlroy said: “You've got a six-foot putt and they’ll shout "It doesn't break as much as you think," just stuff like that - stuff they don't have to say. Whoever is teeing off at 8:30 in the morning doesn't get that and can just go about his business and do his thing. That's tough. Tiger has to deal with that every single time he goes out to play.” Woods (R) agreed with McIlroy's assessment Credit: Getty Images Woods concurred with McIlroy, claiming that he would have even more than his 106 professional wins otherwise. “It's cost me a lot of shots over the years,” he said. “And it's been a lot because all it takes is one shot on a Thursday and you lose the tournament by a shot on Sunday. What people don't realise, it's not just something that happens on Sunday afternoon - this is cumulative and it's par for the course. But I've dealt with it for a very long time.” Woods was not despondent with his 72-76 performance for a six-over total and insisted he has lowered his expectations after his spinal fusion operation last year. At the 11th hour, he has entered the Honda Classic, which starts near to his home in West Palm beach on Thursday. “I haven't played golf in years, but I'm starting to come back and it's going to take a little time,” he said. “I’m progressing and starting to get a feel for tournament golf again. I just need to clean up my rounds.” McIlroy will also be in that Florida field and after a disappointing two-over 73 in the third round here, he will almost certainly still be looking for his first win in 17 months. There were three birdies , but three bogeys and a double-bogey on the 12th as he fell back to level par. England’s Tommy Fleetwood shot his own 73 and is on one-over in his first official event as a PGA Tour member.
Rory McIlroy has rounded on the overly enthusiastic golf fans and claimed Tiger Woods is operating at a “two-shot disadvantage” to the rest of the field because of the “circus” which surrounds his competitive appearances. McIlroy played with Woods as the 42-year-old missed the cut here at the Genesis Open and expressed his sympathy. The Ulsterman hopes that the distracting clamour is a“novelty” because this was only Woods’ second performance in more than a year after back surgery. “It might always have been like this like the whole Tiger mania and these dudes, but I swear, playing in front of all that, he gives up half a shot a day on the field,” McIlroy said. “Like it's two shots a tournament he has to give because of all that that goes on around. So whether that calms down the more he plays and it doesn't become such a novelty that he's back out playing again I don’t know. But it's tiring. I need a couple Advil. I've got a headache after all that.” When asked to elaborate, McIlroy said: “You've got a six-foot putt and they’ll shout "It doesn't break as much as you think," just stuff like that - stuff they don't have to say. Whoever is teeing off at 8:30 in the morning doesn't get that and can just go about his business and do his thing. That's tough. Tiger has to deal with that every single time he goes out to play.” Woods (R) agreed with McIlroy's assessment Credit: Getty Images Woods concurred with McIlroy, claiming that he would have even more than his 106 professional wins otherwise. “It's cost me a lot of shots over the years,” he said. “And it's been a lot because all it takes is one shot on a Thursday and you lose the tournament by a shot on Sunday. What people don't realise, it's not just something that happens on Sunday afternoon - this is cumulative and it's par for the course. But I've dealt with it for a very long time.” Woods was not despondent with his 72-76 performance for a six-over total and insisted he has lowered his expectations after his spinal fusion operation last year. At the 11th hour, he has entered the Honda Classic, which starts near to his home in West Palm beach on Thursday. “I haven't played golf in years, but I'm starting to come back and it's going to take a little time,” he said. “I’m progressing and starting to get a feel for tournament golf again. I just need to clean up my rounds.” McIlroy will also be in that Florida field and after a disappointing two-over 73 in the third round here, he will almost certainly still be looking for his first win in 17 months. There were three birdies , but three bogeys and a double-bogey on the 12th as he fell back to level par. England’s Tommy Fleetwood shot his own 73 and is on one-over in his first official event as a PGA Tour member.
Rory McIlroy turns on fans and says 'circus' around Tiger Woods puts American at 'two-shot disadvantage'
Rory McIlroy has rounded on the overly enthusiastic golf fans and claimed Tiger Woods is operating at a “two-shot disadvantage” to the rest of the field because of the “circus” which surrounds his competitive appearances. McIlroy played with Woods as the 42-year-old missed the cut here at the Genesis Open and expressed his sympathy. The Ulsterman hopes that the distracting clamour is a“novelty” because this was only Woods’ second performance in more than a year after back surgery. “It might always have been like this like the whole Tiger mania and these dudes, but I swear, playing in front of all that, he gives up half a shot a day on the field,” McIlroy said. “Like it's two shots a tournament he has to give because of all that that goes on around. So whether that calms down the more he plays and it doesn't become such a novelty that he's back out playing again I don’t know. But it's tiring. I need a couple Advil. I've got a headache after all that.” When asked to elaborate, McIlroy said: “You've got a six-foot putt and they’ll shout "It doesn't break as much as you think," just stuff like that - stuff they don't have to say. Whoever is teeing off at 8:30 in the morning doesn't get that and can just go about his business and do his thing. That's tough. Tiger has to deal with that every single time he goes out to play.” Woods (R) agreed with McIlroy's assessment Credit: Getty Images Woods concurred with McIlroy, claiming that he would have even more than his 106 professional wins otherwise. “It's cost me a lot of shots over the years,” he said. “And it's been a lot because all it takes is one shot on a Thursday and you lose the tournament by a shot on Sunday. What people don't realise, it's not just something that happens on Sunday afternoon - this is cumulative and it's par for the course. But I've dealt with it for a very long time.” Woods was not despondent with his 72-76 performance for a six-over total and insisted he has lowered his expectations after his spinal fusion operation last year. At the 11th hour, he has entered the Honda Classic, which starts near to his home in West Palm beach on Thursday. “I haven't played golf in years, but I'm starting to come back and it's going to take a little time,” he said. “I’m progressing and starting to get a feel for tournament golf again. I just need to clean up my rounds.” McIlroy will also be in that Florida field and after a disappointing two-over 73 in the third round here, he will almost certainly still be looking for his first win in 17 months. There were three birdies , but three bogeys and a double-bogey on the 12th as he fell back to level par. England’s Tommy Fleetwood shot his own 73 and is on one-over in his first official event as a PGA Tour member.
Luke Donald has been back here at Riviera Country Club these last few days, trying to recreate the good memories, attempting to start the climb his way back up the mountain, towards the summit which he once conquered. And, at least in one respect, Donald succeeded, as he made his first cut of 2018. Except he needs rather more than scraping into the weekend if he is arrest a downfall which is starting to look inexorable. Consider that it was only a little more than five years ago that Donald was world No 1. And then consider that he came into this Genesis Open after three missed cuts to begin the campaign, ranked 177th, the lowest he has been since his first season as a professional 15 years ago and without a win in more than four years. Donald turned 40 two months ago, but never can a golfing life have felt less like it was at a beginning. Yet still he claims the fire is lit and that the hunger exists to dine once more at the exclusive tables. Three years ago, he told Telegraph Sport that he had wondered whether he “wanted to continue doing this”. But sessions with Dr Michael Gervais – the sports psychologist famous for working with Felix Baumgartner as he became the first human to break the sound barrier without mechanical help in that 24-mile skydive – rekindled the Donald desire and although his career has mercilessly carried on its freefall, quitting is no longer in his mind. Regardless of the fact that with on-course earnings of nigh on £40 million, and off-course at least the same again, he hardly requires the weekly pay cheque. Donald was world No 1 back in 2011 Credit: AP “My competitiveness is just as strong as it was,” Donald said. “Yeah, it’s been a struggle so far this year, but it’s funny, sometimes you miss cuts and you feel kind of hopeless – and I’ve been missing cuts and feeling kind of hopeful. Good stuff will come, and it doesn’t feel far away. I’m feeling positive. “True, I don’t beat myself up anywhere nearly like I used to. But with my family, my view of what is most important has, of course, shifted. And that’s the hardest thing, I suppose. Putting in all this effort and not coming away with anything tangible to show for it, when I could have been home watching my three girls grow up every day at an important stage of their lives. No, I don’t have to do this. But I do enjoy it. I’ll give it a few more years.” When located in the iconic Riviera clubhouse, Donald is anything but downcast. Indeed, the deadpan humour is as sharp as ever in this quiet Englishman who has always belied his persona. He laughs when asked about the heart scare he endured at the RSM Classic in Georgia in November when he was taken to hospital with chest pains. “It was worrying, but after a day of tests it was all fine,” he said. “But if it had turned out to be heart-related I would have been seriously annoyed. I would have drank much more beer and ate anything I wanted and not been as healthy as I’ve been for 40 years. But there’s life left in me yet.’ Neither does his legacy show any signs of keeling over any time soon. In the age of the bombers, he was the arch plotter who somehow found the pathway through all those controlled explosions to the hottest seat of all and the experts are becoming increasingly appreciative. No less an authority than the Golf Channel recently hailed Donald as “the last of his kind”, as “the short hitter who consistently found a way to beat the best” and although the 5ft 8-incher weighing 11-stone sees himself as a “medium-hitter”, he recognises the compliment. “That does give me a lot of pride,” Donald said. “To have got to No 1 and stayed there for a significant amount of time in 56 weeks, during an era when not a lot of people thought that was possible. Donald wants to work his way back to the top Credit: USA TODAY Sports “Most of the top players of these times have been long hitters and I’m glad I was able to do it my way. It wasn’t easy but I found a way to get around it.” In truth, there was only one way he could compensate. What Donald lost off the tee, he simply had to make up on and around the greens. The rise of the “strokes gained” stats in the last few years has put his feat in even starker terms. In conversation with Mark Broadie, the university professor who has been dubbed “The Godfather of Golf Analytics” for his work in developing this revolutionary method of measuring and compartmentalising performance, he claimed Donald’s ascent to be “freakish”, an “anomaly” and only half jokingly said “he is a statistical miracle man”. Donald worked with Broadie when he was still formulating his system, so understands the numbers as well as anyone. “The magic formula is you have to gain two strokes on the field per round,” Donald said. “I’m losing 1½ [strokes] off the tee if I’m not hitting it 300 yards all the time, so I have to find 3½ strokes in the rest of my game, which is almost impossible. That’s what it was when I was No 1.” Imagine being aware of that. Is it a boon to know the exact formula to recover your superiority, but that it demands you are ludicrously superior in a few aspects of the game while remaining inferior in the most crucial aspect and so achieve something “almost impossible”? In Donald’s eyes it is understandably a case of “I’ve done it before, I can do it again”, but so much has changed in the brief spell since his reign. The five golfers to have won a career grand slam - and the 12 three-major winners, including Jordan Spieth The youngsters are coming out longer and straighter, the technology is making everyone longer and straighter and, on a misguided mission to ensure the scores remain comparable with the tournaments of yore, the Tours revert ever more to their eye-straining solution. Take Riviera, this George C Thomas masterpiece created in 1923. When Tiger Woods made his first start in a professional event here in 1992, it was 400 yards shorter. A full par four. “That’s the trend in golf, to make courses longer to combat how far the guys are hitting it,” Donald said. “It’s a shame that some of these classic courses are becoming too short to host the top events and, because of that, it would be nice to roll the ball back.” That is supposedly in the pipeline with the R&A and USGA, the two governing bodies, seemingly ready at last to act. Apart from the inevitable legal threat from the ball-makers, the biggest obstacle seems to be the reluctance to break tradition by having two differing sets of rules for the amateurs and pros. “There are concerns about that, but I’m a supporter of bifurcation,” Donald said. “It should be different rules for us and them. The amateurs should be able do whatever they want. It doesn’t matter if they anchor the putter or whatever. The game to them should just be fun. For us it’s a different story.’ Dare we say, for Donald at the moment, that last comment seems depressingly apt. His smile and hearty farewell suggested otherwise.
Luke Donald the 'miracle man' plans to reach golf's summit again
Luke Donald has been back here at Riviera Country Club these last few days, trying to recreate the good memories, attempting to start the climb his way back up the mountain, towards the summit which he once conquered. And, at least in one respect, Donald succeeded, as he made his first cut of 2018. Except he needs rather more than scraping into the weekend if he is arrest a downfall which is starting to look inexorable. Consider that it was only a little more than five years ago that Donald was world No 1. And then consider that he came into this Genesis Open after three missed cuts to begin the campaign, ranked 177th, the lowest he has been since his first season as a professional 15 years ago and without a win in more than four years. Donald turned 40 two months ago, but never can a golfing life have felt less like it was at a beginning. Yet still he claims the fire is lit and that the hunger exists to dine once more at the exclusive tables. Three years ago, he told Telegraph Sport that he had wondered whether he “wanted to continue doing this”. But sessions with Dr Michael Gervais – the sports psychologist famous for working with Felix Baumgartner as he became the first human to break the sound barrier without mechanical help in that 24-mile skydive – rekindled the Donald desire and although his career has mercilessly carried on its freefall, quitting is no longer in his mind. Regardless of the fact that with on-course earnings of nigh on £40 million, and off-course at least the same again, he hardly requires the weekly pay cheque. Donald was world No 1 back in 2011 Credit: AP “My competitiveness is just as strong as it was,” Donald said. “Yeah, it’s been a struggle so far this year, but it’s funny, sometimes you miss cuts and you feel kind of hopeless – and I’ve been missing cuts and feeling kind of hopeful. Good stuff will come, and it doesn’t feel far away. I’m feeling positive. “True, I don’t beat myself up anywhere nearly like I used to. But with my family, my view of what is most important has, of course, shifted. And that’s the hardest thing, I suppose. Putting in all this effort and not coming away with anything tangible to show for it, when I could have been home watching my three girls grow up every day at an important stage of their lives. No, I don’t have to do this. But I do enjoy it. I’ll give it a few more years.” When located in the iconic Riviera clubhouse, Donald is anything but downcast. Indeed, the deadpan humour is as sharp as ever in this quiet Englishman who has always belied his persona. He laughs when asked about the heart scare he endured at the RSM Classic in Georgia in November when he was taken to hospital with chest pains. “It was worrying, but after a day of tests it was all fine,” he said. “But if it had turned out to be heart-related I would have been seriously annoyed. I would have drank much more beer and ate anything I wanted and not been as healthy as I’ve been for 40 years. But there’s life left in me yet.’ Neither does his legacy show any signs of keeling over any time soon. In the age of the bombers, he was the arch plotter who somehow found the pathway through all those controlled explosions to the hottest seat of all and the experts are becoming increasingly appreciative. No less an authority than the Golf Channel recently hailed Donald as “the last of his kind”, as “the short hitter who consistently found a way to beat the best” and although the 5ft 8-incher weighing 11-stone sees himself as a “medium-hitter”, he recognises the compliment. “That does give me a lot of pride,” Donald said. “To have got to No 1 and stayed there for a significant amount of time in 56 weeks, during an era when not a lot of people thought that was possible. Donald wants to work his way back to the top Credit: USA TODAY Sports “Most of the top players of these times have been long hitters and I’m glad I was able to do it my way. It wasn’t easy but I found a way to get around it.” In truth, there was only one way he could compensate. What Donald lost off the tee, he simply had to make up on and around the greens. The rise of the “strokes gained” stats in the last few years has put his feat in even starker terms. In conversation with Mark Broadie, the university professor who has been dubbed “The Godfather of Golf Analytics” for his work in developing this revolutionary method of measuring and compartmentalising performance, he claimed Donald’s ascent to be “freakish”, an “anomaly” and only half jokingly said “he is a statistical miracle man”. Donald worked with Broadie when he was still formulating his system, so understands the numbers as well as anyone. “The magic formula is you have to gain two strokes on the field per round,” Donald said. “I’m losing 1½ [strokes] off the tee if I’m not hitting it 300 yards all the time, so I have to find 3½ strokes in the rest of my game, which is almost impossible. That’s what it was when I was No 1.” Imagine being aware of that. Is it a boon to know the exact formula to recover your superiority, but that it demands you are ludicrously superior in a few aspects of the game while remaining inferior in the most crucial aspect and so achieve something “almost impossible”? In Donald’s eyes it is understandably a case of “I’ve done it before, I can do it again”, but so much has changed in the brief spell since his reign. The five golfers to have won a career grand slam - and the 12 three-major winners, including Jordan Spieth The youngsters are coming out longer and straighter, the technology is making everyone longer and straighter and, on a misguided mission to ensure the scores remain comparable with the tournaments of yore, the Tours revert ever more to their eye-straining solution. Take Riviera, this George C Thomas masterpiece created in 1923. When Tiger Woods made his first start in a professional event here in 1992, it was 400 yards shorter. A full par four. “That’s the trend in golf, to make courses longer to combat how far the guys are hitting it,” Donald said. “It’s a shame that some of these classic courses are becoming too short to host the top events and, because of that, it would be nice to roll the ball back.” That is supposedly in the pipeline with the R&A and USGA, the two governing bodies, seemingly ready at last to act. Apart from the inevitable legal threat from the ball-makers, the biggest obstacle seems to be the reluctance to break tradition by having two differing sets of rules for the amateurs and pros. “There are concerns about that, but I’m a supporter of bifurcation,” Donald said. “It should be different rules for us and them. The amateurs should be able do whatever they want. It doesn’t matter if they anchor the putter or whatever. The game to them should just be fun. For us it’s a different story.’ Dare we say, for Donald at the moment, that last comment seems depressingly apt. His smile and hearty farewell suggested otherwise.
Luke Donald has been back here at Riviera Country Club these last few days, trying to recreate the good memories, attempting to start the climb his way back up the mountain, towards the summit which he once conquered. And, at least in one respect, Donald succeeded, as he made his first cut of 2018. Except he needs rather more than scraping into the weekend if he is arrest a downfall which is starting to look inexorable. Consider that it was only a little more than five years ago that Donald was world No 1. And then consider that he came into this Genesis Open after three missed cuts to begin the campaign, ranked 177th, the lowest he has been since his first season as a professional 15 years ago and without a win in more than four years. Donald turned 40 two months ago, but never can a golfing life have felt less like it was at a beginning. Yet still he claims the fire is lit and that the hunger exists to dine once more at the exclusive tables. Three years ago, he told Telegraph Sport that he had wondered whether he “wanted to continue doing this”. But sessions with Dr Michael Gervais – the sports psychologist famous for working with Felix Baumgartner as he became the first human to break the sound barrier without mechanical help in that 24-mile skydive – rekindled the Donald desire and although his career has mercilessly carried on its freefall, quitting is no longer in his mind. Regardless of the fact that with on-course earnings of nigh on £40 million, and off-course at least the same again, he hardly requires the weekly pay cheque. Donald was world No 1 back in 2011 Credit: AP “My competitiveness is just as strong as it was,” Donald said. “Yeah, it’s been a struggle so far this year, but it’s funny, sometimes you miss cuts and you feel kind of hopeless – and I’ve been missing cuts and feeling kind of hopeful. Good stuff will come, and it doesn’t feel far away. I’m feeling positive. “True, I don’t beat myself up anywhere nearly like I used to. But with my family, my view of what is most important has, of course, shifted. And that’s the hardest thing, I suppose. Putting in all this effort and not coming away with anything tangible to show for it, when I could have been home watching my three girls grow up every day at an important stage of their lives. No, I don’t have to do this. But I do enjoy it. I’ll give it a few more years.” When located in the iconic Riviera clubhouse, Donald is anything but downcast. Indeed, the deadpan humour is as sharp as ever in this quiet Englishman who has always belied his persona. He laughs when asked about the heart scare he endured at the RSM Classic in Georgia in November when he was taken to hospital with chest pains. “It was worrying, but after a day of tests it was all fine,” he said. “But if it had turned out to be heart-related I would have been seriously annoyed. I would have drank much more beer and ate anything I wanted and not been as healthy as I’ve been for 40 years. But there’s life left in me yet.’ Neither does his legacy show any signs of keeling over any time soon. In the age of the bombers, he was the arch plotter who somehow found the pathway through all those controlled explosions to the hottest seat of all and the experts are becoming increasingly appreciative. No less an authority than the Golf Channel recently hailed Donald as “the last of his kind”, as “the short hitter who consistently found a way to beat the best” and although the 5ft 8-incher weighing 11-stone sees himself as a “medium-hitter”, he recognises the compliment. “That does give me a lot of pride,” Donald said. “To have got to No 1 and stayed there for a significant amount of time in 56 weeks, during an era when not a lot of people thought that was possible. Donald wants to work his way back to the top Credit: USA TODAY Sports “Most of the top players of these times have been long hitters and I’m glad I was able to do it my way. It wasn’t easy but I found a way to get around it.” In truth, there was only one way he could compensate. What Donald lost off the tee, he simply had to make up on and around the greens. The rise of the “strokes gained” stats in the last few years has put his feat in even starker terms. In conversation with Mark Broadie, the university professor who has been dubbed “The Godfather of Golf Analytics” for his work in developing this revolutionary method of measuring and compartmentalising performance, he claimed Donald’s ascent to be “freakish”, an “anomaly” and only half jokingly said “he is a statistical miracle man”. Donald worked with Broadie when he was still formulating his system, so understands the numbers as well as anyone. “The magic formula is you have to gain two strokes on the field per round,” Donald said. “I’m losing 1½ [strokes] off the tee if I’m not hitting it 300 yards all the time, so I have to find 3½ strokes in the rest of my game, which is almost impossible. That’s what it was when I was No 1.” Imagine being aware of that. Is it a boon to know the exact formula to recover your superiority, but that it demands you are ludicrously superior in a few aspects of the game while remaining inferior in the most crucial aspect and so achieve something “almost impossible”? In Donald’s eyes it is understandably a case of “I’ve done it before, I can do it again”, but so much has changed in the brief spell since his reign. The five golfers to have won a career grand slam - and the 12 three-major winners, including Jordan Spieth The youngsters are coming out longer and straighter, the technology is making everyone longer and straighter and, on a misguided mission to ensure the scores remain comparable with the tournaments of yore, the Tours revert ever more to their eye-straining solution. Take Riviera, this George C Thomas masterpiece created in 1923. When Tiger Woods made his first start in a professional event here in 1992, it was 400 yards shorter. A full par four. “That’s the trend in golf, to make courses longer to combat how far the guys are hitting it,” Donald said. “It’s a shame that some of these classic courses are becoming too short to host the top events and, because of that, it would be nice to roll the ball back.” That is supposedly in the pipeline with the R&A and USGA, the two governing bodies, seemingly ready at last to act. Apart from the inevitable legal threat from the ball-makers, the biggest obstacle seems to be the reluctance to break tradition by having two differing sets of rules for the amateurs and pros. “There are concerns about that, but I’m a supporter of bifurcation,” Donald said. “It should be different rules for us and them. The amateurs should be able do whatever they want. It doesn’t matter if they anchor the putter or whatever. The game to them should just be fun. For us it’s a different story.’ Dare we say, for Donald at the moment, that last comment seems depressingly apt. His smile and hearty farewell suggested otherwise.
Luke Donald the 'miracle man' plans to reach golf's summit again
Luke Donald has been back here at Riviera Country Club these last few days, trying to recreate the good memories, attempting to start the climb his way back up the mountain, towards the summit which he once conquered. And, at least in one respect, Donald succeeded, as he made his first cut of 2018. Except he needs rather more than scraping into the weekend if he is arrest a downfall which is starting to look inexorable. Consider that it was only a little more than five years ago that Donald was world No 1. And then consider that he came into this Genesis Open after three missed cuts to begin the campaign, ranked 177th, the lowest he has been since his first season as a professional 15 years ago and without a win in more than four years. Donald turned 40 two months ago, but never can a golfing life have felt less like it was at a beginning. Yet still he claims the fire is lit and that the hunger exists to dine once more at the exclusive tables. Three years ago, he told Telegraph Sport that he had wondered whether he “wanted to continue doing this”. But sessions with Dr Michael Gervais – the sports psychologist famous for working with Felix Baumgartner as he became the first human to break the sound barrier without mechanical help in that 24-mile skydive – rekindled the Donald desire and although his career has mercilessly carried on its freefall, quitting is no longer in his mind. Regardless of the fact that with on-course earnings of nigh on £40 million, and off-course at least the same again, he hardly requires the weekly pay cheque. Donald was world No 1 back in 2011 Credit: AP “My competitiveness is just as strong as it was,” Donald said. “Yeah, it’s been a struggle so far this year, but it’s funny, sometimes you miss cuts and you feel kind of hopeless – and I’ve been missing cuts and feeling kind of hopeful. Good stuff will come, and it doesn’t feel far away. I’m feeling positive. “True, I don’t beat myself up anywhere nearly like I used to. But with my family, my view of what is most important has, of course, shifted. And that’s the hardest thing, I suppose. Putting in all this effort and not coming away with anything tangible to show for it, when I could have been home watching my three girls grow up every day at an important stage of their lives. No, I don’t have to do this. But I do enjoy it. I’ll give it a few more years.” When located in the iconic Riviera clubhouse, Donald is anything but downcast. Indeed, the deadpan humour is as sharp as ever in this quiet Englishman who has always belied his persona. He laughs when asked about the heart scare he endured at the RSM Classic in Georgia in November when he was taken to hospital with chest pains. “It was worrying, but after a day of tests it was all fine,” he said. “But if it had turned out to be heart-related I would have been seriously annoyed. I would have drank much more beer and ate anything I wanted and not been as healthy as I’ve been for 40 years. But there’s life left in me yet.’ Neither does his legacy show any signs of keeling over any time soon. In the age of the bombers, he was the arch plotter who somehow found the pathway through all those controlled explosions to the hottest seat of all and the experts are becoming increasingly appreciative. No less an authority than the Golf Channel recently hailed Donald as “the last of his kind”, as “the short hitter who consistently found a way to beat the best” and although the 5ft 8-incher weighing 11-stone sees himself as a “medium-hitter”, he recognises the compliment. “That does give me a lot of pride,” Donald said. “To have got to No 1 and stayed there for a significant amount of time in 56 weeks, during an era when not a lot of people thought that was possible. Donald wants to work his way back to the top Credit: USA TODAY Sports “Most of the top players of these times have been long hitters and I’m glad I was able to do it my way. It wasn’t easy but I found a way to get around it.” In truth, there was only one way he could compensate. What Donald lost off the tee, he simply had to make up on and around the greens. The rise of the “strokes gained” stats in the last few years has put his feat in even starker terms. In conversation with Mark Broadie, the university professor who has been dubbed “The Godfather of Golf Analytics” for his work in developing this revolutionary method of measuring and compartmentalising performance, he claimed Donald’s ascent to be “freakish”, an “anomaly” and only half jokingly said “he is a statistical miracle man”. Donald worked with Broadie when he was still formulating his system, so understands the numbers as well as anyone. “The magic formula is you have to gain two strokes on the field per round,” Donald said. “I’m losing 1½ [strokes] off the tee if I’m not hitting it 300 yards all the time, so I have to find 3½ strokes in the rest of my game, which is almost impossible. That’s what it was when I was No 1.” Imagine being aware of that. Is it a boon to know the exact formula to recover your superiority, but that it demands you are ludicrously superior in a few aspects of the game while remaining inferior in the most crucial aspect and so achieve something “almost impossible”? In Donald’s eyes it is understandably a case of “I’ve done it before, I can do it again”, but so much has changed in the brief spell since his reign. The five golfers to have won a career grand slam - and the 12 three-major winners, including Jordan Spieth The youngsters are coming out longer and straighter, the technology is making everyone longer and straighter and, on a misguided mission to ensure the scores remain comparable with the tournaments of yore, the Tours revert ever more to their eye-straining solution. Take Riviera, this George C Thomas masterpiece created in 1923. When Tiger Woods made his first start in a professional event here in 1992, it was 400 yards shorter. A full par four. “That’s the trend in golf, to make courses longer to combat how far the guys are hitting it,” Donald said. “It’s a shame that some of these classic courses are becoming too short to host the top events and, because of that, it would be nice to roll the ball back.” That is supposedly in the pipeline with the R&A and USGA, the two governing bodies, seemingly ready at last to act. Apart from the inevitable legal threat from the ball-makers, the biggest obstacle seems to be the reluctance to break tradition by having two differing sets of rules for the amateurs and pros. “There are concerns about that, but I’m a supporter of bifurcation,” Donald said. “It should be different rules for us and them. The amateurs should be able do whatever they want. It doesn’t matter if they anchor the putter or whatever. The game to them should just be fun. For us it’s a different story.’ Dare we say, for Donald at the moment, that last comment seems depressingly apt. His smile and hearty farewell suggested otherwise.
Luke Donald has been back here at Riviera Country Club these last few days, trying to recreate the good memories, attempting to start the climb his way back up the mountain, towards the summit which he once conquered. And, at least in one respect, Donald succeeded, as he made his first cut of 2018. Except he needs rather more than scraping into the weekend if he is arrest a downfall which is starting to look inexorable. Consider that it was only a little more than five years ago that Donald was world No 1. And then consider that he came into this Genesis Open after three missed cuts to begin the campaign, ranked 177th, the lowest he has been since his first season as a professional 15 years ago and without a win in more than four years. Donald turned 40 two months ago, but never can a golfing life have felt less like it was at a beginning. Yet still he claims the fire is lit and that the hunger exists to dine once more at the exclusive tables. Three years ago, he told Telegraph Sport that he had wondered whether he “wanted to continue doing this”. But sessions with Dr Michael Gervais – the sports psychologist famous for working with Felix Baumgartner as he became the first human to break the sound barrier without mechanical help in that 24-mile skydive – rekindled the Donald desire and although his career has mercilessly carried on its freefall, quitting is no longer in his mind. Regardless of the fact that with on-course earnings of nigh on £40 million, and off-course at least the same again, he hardly requires the weekly pay cheque. Donald was world No 1 back in 2011 Credit: AP “My competitiveness is just as strong as it was,” Donald said. “Yeah, it’s been a struggle so far this year, but it’s funny, sometimes you miss cuts and you feel kind of hopeless – and I’ve been missing cuts and feeling kind of hopeful. Good stuff will come, and it doesn’t feel far away. I’m feeling positive. “True, I don’t beat myself up anywhere nearly like I used to. But with my family, my view of what is most important has, of course, shifted. And that’s the hardest thing, I suppose. Putting in all this effort and not coming away with anything tangible to show for it, when I could have been home watching my three girls grow up every day at an important stage of their lives. No, I don’t have to do this. But I do enjoy it. I’ll give it a few more years.” When located in the iconic Riviera clubhouse, Donald is anything but downcast. Indeed, the deadpan humour is as sharp as ever in this quiet Englishman who has always belied his persona. He laughs when asked about the heart scare he endured at the RSM Classic in Georgia in November when he was taken to hospital with chest pains. “It was worrying, but after a day of tests it was all fine,” he said. “But if it had turned out to be heart-related I would have been seriously annoyed. I would have drank much more beer and ate anything I wanted and not been as healthy as I’ve been for 40 years. But there’s life left in me yet.’ Neither does his legacy show any signs of keeling over any time soon. In the age of the bombers, he was the arch plotter who somehow found the pathway through all those controlled explosions to the hottest seat of all and the experts are becoming increasingly appreciative. No less an authority than the Golf Channel recently hailed Donald as “the last of his kind”, as “the short hitter who consistently found a way to beat the best” and although the 5ft 8-incher weighing 11-stone sees himself as a “medium-hitter”, he recognises the compliment. “That does give me a lot of pride,” Donald said. “To have got to No 1 and stayed there for a significant amount of time in 56 weeks, during an era when not a lot of people thought that was possible. Donald wants to work his way back to the top Credit: USA TODAY Sports “Most of the top players of these times have been long hitters and I’m glad I was able to do it my way. It wasn’t easy but I found a way to get around it.” In truth, there was only one way he could compensate. What Donald lost off the tee, he simply had to make up on and around the greens. The rise of the “strokes gained” stats in the last few years has put his feat in even starker terms. In conversation with Mark Broadie, the university professor who has been dubbed “The Godfather of Golf Analytics” for his work in developing this revolutionary method of measuring and compartmentalising performance, he claimed Donald’s ascent to be “freakish”, an “anomaly” and only half jokingly said “he is a statistical miracle man”. Donald worked with Broadie when he was still formulating his system, so understands the numbers as well as anyone. “The magic formula is you have to gain two strokes on the field per round,” Donald said. “I’m losing 1½ [strokes] off the tee if I’m not hitting it 300 yards all the time, so I have to find 3½ strokes in the rest of my game, which is almost impossible. That’s what it was when I was No 1.” Imagine being aware of that. Is it a boon to know the exact formula to recover your superiority, but that it demands you are ludicrously superior in a few aspects of the game while remaining inferior in the most crucial aspect and so achieve something “almost impossible”? In Donald’s eyes it is understandably a case of “I’ve done it before, I can do it again”, but so much has changed in the brief spell since his reign. The five golfers to have won a career grand slam - and the 12 three-major winners, including Jordan Spieth The youngsters are coming out longer and straighter, the technology is making everyone longer and straighter and, on a misguided mission to ensure the scores remain comparable with the tournaments of yore, the Tours revert ever more to their eye-straining solution. Take Riviera, this George C Thomas masterpiece created in 1923. When Tiger Woods made his first start in a professional event here in 1992, it was 400 yards shorter. A full par four. “That’s the trend in golf, to make courses longer to combat how far the guys are hitting it,” Donald said. “It’s a shame that some of these classic courses are becoming too short to host the top events and, because of that, it would be nice to roll the ball back.” That is supposedly in the pipeline with the R&A and USGA, the two governing bodies, seemingly ready at last to act. Apart from the inevitable legal threat from the ball-makers, the biggest obstacle seems to be the reluctance to break tradition by having two differing sets of rules for the amateurs and pros. “There are concerns about that, but I’m a supporter of bifurcation,” Donald said. “It should be different rules for us and them. The amateurs should be able do whatever they want. It doesn’t matter if they anchor the putter or whatever. The game to them should just be fun. For us it’s a different story.’ Dare we say, for Donald at the moment, that last comment seems depressingly apt. His smile and hearty farewell suggested otherwise.
Luke Donald the 'miracle man' plans to reach golf's summit again
Luke Donald has been back here at Riviera Country Club these last few days, trying to recreate the good memories, attempting to start the climb his way back up the mountain, towards the summit which he once conquered. And, at least in one respect, Donald succeeded, as he made his first cut of 2018. Except he needs rather more than scraping into the weekend if he is arrest a downfall which is starting to look inexorable. Consider that it was only a little more than five years ago that Donald was world No 1. And then consider that he came into this Genesis Open after three missed cuts to begin the campaign, ranked 177th, the lowest he has been since his first season as a professional 15 years ago and without a win in more than four years. Donald turned 40 two months ago, but never can a golfing life have felt less like it was at a beginning. Yet still he claims the fire is lit and that the hunger exists to dine once more at the exclusive tables. Three years ago, he told Telegraph Sport that he had wondered whether he “wanted to continue doing this”. But sessions with Dr Michael Gervais – the sports psychologist famous for working with Felix Baumgartner as he became the first human to break the sound barrier without mechanical help in that 24-mile skydive – rekindled the Donald desire and although his career has mercilessly carried on its freefall, quitting is no longer in his mind. Regardless of the fact that with on-course earnings of nigh on £40 million, and off-course at least the same again, he hardly requires the weekly pay cheque. Donald was world No 1 back in 2011 Credit: AP “My competitiveness is just as strong as it was,” Donald said. “Yeah, it’s been a struggle so far this year, but it’s funny, sometimes you miss cuts and you feel kind of hopeless – and I’ve been missing cuts and feeling kind of hopeful. Good stuff will come, and it doesn’t feel far away. I’m feeling positive. “True, I don’t beat myself up anywhere nearly like I used to. But with my family, my view of what is most important has, of course, shifted. And that’s the hardest thing, I suppose. Putting in all this effort and not coming away with anything tangible to show for it, when I could have been home watching my three girls grow up every day at an important stage of their lives. No, I don’t have to do this. But I do enjoy it. I’ll give it a few more years.” When located in the iconic Riviera clubhouse, Donald is anything but downcast. Indeed, the deadpan humour is as sharp as ever in this quiet Englishman who has always belied his persona. He laughs when asked about the heart scare he endured at the RSM Classic in Georgia in November when he was taken to hospital with chest pains. “It was worrying, but after a day of tests it was all fine,” he said. “But if it had turned out to be heart-related I would have been seriously annoyed. I would have drank much more beer and ate anything I wanted and not been as healthy as I’ve been for 40 years. But there’s life left in me yet.’ Neither does his legacy show any signs of keeling over any time soon. In the age of the bombers, he was the arch plotter who somehow found the pathway through all those controlled explosions to the hottest seat of all and the experts are becoming increasingly appreciative. No less an authority than the Golf Channel recently hailed Donald as “the last of his kind”, as “the short hitter who consistently found a way to beat the best” and although the 5ft 8-incher weighing 11-stone sees himself as a “medium-hitter”, he recognises the compliment. “That does give me a lot of pride,” Donald said. “To have got to No 1 and stayed there for a significant amount of time in 56 weeks, during an era when not a lot of people thought that was possible. Donald wants to work his way back to the top Credit: USA TODAY Sports “Most of the top players of these times have been long hitters and I’m glad I was able to do it my way. It wasn’t easy but I found a way to get around it.” In truth, there was only one way he could compensate. What Donald lost off the tee, he simply had to make up on and around the greens. The rise of the “strokes gained” stats in the last few years has put his feat in even starker terms. In conversation with Mark Broadie, the university professor who has been dubbed “The Godfather of Golf Analytics” for his work in developing this revolutionary method of measuring and compartmentalising performance, he claimed Donald’s ascent to be “freakish”, an “anomaly” and only half jokingly said “he is a statistical miracle man”. Donald worked with Broadie when he was still formulating his system, so understands the numbers as well as anyone. “The magic formula is you have to gain two strokes on the field per round,” Donald said. “I’m losing 1½ [strokes] off the tee if I’m not hitting it 300 yards all the time, so I have to find 3½ strokes in the rest of my game, which is almost impossible. That’s what it was when I was No 1.” Imagine being aware of that. Is it a boon to know the exact formula to recover your superiority, but that it demands you are ludicrously superior in a few aspects of the game while remaining inferior in the most crucial aspect and so achieve something “almost impossible”? In Donald’s eyes it is understandably a case of “I’ve done it before, I can do it again”, but so much has changed in the brief spell since his reign. The five golfers to have won a career grand slam - and the 12 three-major winners, including Jordan Spieth The youngsters are coming out longer and straighter, the technology is making everyone longer and straighter and, on a misguided mission to ensure the scores remain comparable with the tournaments of yore, the Tours revert ever more to their eye-straining solution. Take Riviera, this George C Thomas masterpiece created in 1923. When Tiger Woods made his first start in a professional event here in 1992, it was 400 yards shorter. A full par four. “That’s the trend in golf, to make courses longer to combat how far the guys are hitting it,” Donald said. “It’s a shame that some of these classic courses are becoming too short to host the top events and, because of that, it would be nice to roll the ball back.” That is supposedly in the pipeline with the R&A and USGA, the two governing bodies, seemingly ready at last to act. Apart from the inevitable legal threat from the ball-makers, the biggest obstacle seems to be the reluctance to break tradition by having two differing sets of rules for the amateurs and pros. “There are concerns about that, but I’m a supporter of bifurcation,” Donald said. “It should be different rules for us and them. The amateurs should be able do whatever they want. It doesn’t matter if they anchor the putter or whatever. The game to them should just be fun. For us it’s a different story.’ Dare we say, for Donald at the moment, that last comment seems depressingly apt. His smile and hearty farewell suggested otherwise.
Tiger Woods missed the cut in his second PGA Tour outing of 2018 and Rory McIlroy believes his treatment by fans may be partly to blame.
Rory McIlroy frustrated by added scrutiny of playing with Tiger Woods
Tiger Woods missed the cut in his second PGA Tour outing of 2018 and Rory McIlroy believes his treatment by fans may be partly to blame.
Tiger Woods missed the cut in his second PGA Tour outing of 2018 and Rory McIlroy believes his treatment by fans may be partly to blame.
McIlroy frustrated by added scrutiny of playing with Woods
Tiger Woods missed the cut in his second PGA Tour outing of 2018 and Rory McIlroy believes his treatment by fans may be partly to blame.
McIlroy (pictured), owner of four major titles himself, played alongside Tiger Woods in the first two rounds of the Genesis Open (AFP Photo/Giuseppe CACACE)
McIlroy (pictured), owner of four major titles himself, played alongside Tiger Woods in the first two rounds of the Genesis Open
McIlroy (pictured), owner of four major titles himself, played alongside Tiger Woods in the first two rounds of the Genesis Open (AFP Photo/Giuseppe CACACE)
McIlroy said there were enough glimpses of Tiger Woods' old short-game magic to warrant optimism (AFP Photo/Mike Ehrmann)
McIlroy said there were enough glimpses of Tiger Woods' old short-game magic to warrant optimism
McIlroy said there were enough glimpses of Tiger Woods' old short-game magic to warrant optimism (AFP Photo/Mike Ehrmann)
Tiger Woods tips his cap to the spectators on the 18th green after finishing the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Woods misses cut at Riviera and moves forward to Florida
Tiger Woods tips his cap to the spectators on the 18th green after finishing the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Tiger Woods hits his tee shot on the 15th hole during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Woods misses cut at Riviera and moves forward to Florida
Tiger Woods hits his tee shot on the 15th hole during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Tiger Woods walks off the first green during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
Woods misses cut at Riviera and moves forward to Florida
Tiger Woods walks off the first green during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
Tiger Woods reacts to a putt that failed to drop on the eighth green during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles, Friday, Feb. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
Woods misses cut at Riviera and moves forward to Florida
Tiger Woods reacts to a putt that failed to drop on the eighth green during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles, Friday, Feb. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
Tiger Woods watches his tee shot on the 16th hole during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Woods misses cut at Riviera and moves forward to Florida
Tiger Woods watches his tee shot on the 16th hole during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Tiger Woods hits out of a fairway bunker on the 17th hole during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Woods misses cut at Riviera and moves forward to Florida
Tiger Woods hits out of a fairway bunker on the 17th hole during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Tiger Woods reacts after missing a putt for par on the 11th hole during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. Woods carded a bogey. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Woods misses cut at Riviera and moves forward to Florida
Tiger Woods reacts after missing a putt for par on the 11th hole during the second round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. Woods carded a bogey. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Tiger Woods is healthy enough to play next week, but as a Genesis Open missed cut showed, his game isn't quite ready to win.
Plenty of good – and bad – in Tiger's missed cut
Tiger Woods is healthy enough to play next week, but as a Genesis Open missed cut showed, his game isn't quite ready to win.
Tiger Woods’ short game was a point of strength last month at the Farmers Insurance Open, but his second round at Riviera fell apart on the greens.
Woods had premonition about putting struggles
Tiger Woods’ short game was a point of strength last month at the Farmers Insurance Open, but his second round at Riviera fell apart on the greens.
After getting a look at the organized chaos that follows Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy believes Woods may be playing at a disadvantage.
McIlroy: Crowd chaos causes Woods 'half a shot a day'
After getting a look at the organized chaos that follows Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy believes Woods may be playing at a disadvantage.
Tiger Tracker postscript: The driver. The putter. The irons. They all failed enough to hand Tiger Woods a missed cut and a free weekend.
TT postscript: Clubs take turns abandoning Woods
Tiger Tracker postscript: The driver. The putter. The irons. They all failed enough to hand Tiger Woods a missed cut and a free weekend.
American veteran and 14-time major champion Tiger Woods missed the cut on Friday and he lamented his display.
Mixed feelings for Tiger Woods after missed cut at Riviera
American veteran and 14-time major champion Tiger Woods missed the cut on Friday and he lamented his display.
CBS Sports golf writer Kyle Porter joins Nick Kostos to break down Tiger's overall performance at the Riviera.
Tiger Woods misses cut after round two of 2018 Genesis Open
CBS Sports golf writer Kyle Porter joins Nick Kostos to break down Tiger's overall performance at the Riviera.
CBS Sports golf writer Kyle Porter joins Nick Kostos to break down Tiger's overall performance at the Riviera.
Tiger Woods misses cut after round two of 2018 Genesis Open
CBS Sports golf writer Kyle Porter joins Nick Kostos to break down Tiger's overall performance at the Riviera.
CBS Sports golf writer Kyle Porter joins Nick Kostos to break down Tiger's overall performance at the Riviera.
Tiger Woods misses cut after round two of 2018 Genesis Open
CBS Sports golf writer Kyle Porter joins Nick Kostos to break down Tiger's overall performance at the Riviera.

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